Prince Harry takes over National Geographic's Instagram account

Amy Woodyatt, CNNPublished 30th September 2019
Prince Harry makes a speech as he dedicates Malawi's Liwonde National Park and the adjoining Mangochi Forest to the Queen's Commonwealth Canopy on September 30, 2019.
(CNN) — Prince Harry is working on his filters, angles and hashtags as he guest edits National Geographic's Instagram feed.
For the first photograph posted to the @NatGeo account, the Duke of Sussex contributed one of his own images of Baobab trees in Liwonde National Park, Malawi.
Writing alongside the photograph, Harry explained that he wanted to encourage social media users to post their own images of trees in the local community "to raise awareness of the vital role trees play in the Earth's ecosystem" and encourage people to "appreciate the beauty of our surroundings."
Harry also posted a photo of a strangler fig tree, taken by photographer Peter Essick.
The duke is currently on a 10-day official tour of southern Africa. He and his wife, Meghan, traveled together to South Africa before Harry continued on to Angola, Malawi and Botswana.
The duke and duchess have been raising awareness of several issues while on official tour -- including counter-poaching operations in Malawi, gender-based violence in South Africa, elephant protection in Botswana and landmines in Angola.
The duke has also used the trip to raise awareness of climate change and the need for conservation -- in an opinion piece published in the UK's Daily Telegraph, Harry wrote: "While I am not an expert in this field, I have been given the great privilege of a platform which I hope I can use wisely. Conservation fails unless you put people at the heart of the solution and for far too long, that hasn't been the case."
"Humans and animals and their habitats fundamentally need to coexist, or within the next 10 years, our problems across the globe will become even more unmanageable," the Duke warned.
"It is fundamental to our survival and we must overcome greed, apathy and selfishness if we are to make real progress," he wrote.