Trump joins Queen at D-Day commemorations

2:42 p.m. ET, June 5, 2019

Here's what you need to know today about Trump's trip

President Trump attends an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings in Portsmouth, southern England, on June 5, 2019.
President Trump attends an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day landings in Portsmouth, southern England, on June 5, 2019. JEFF J MITCHELL/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump joined Queen Elizabeth II and British Prime Minister Theresa May at an event Wednesday to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.

The President's whirlwind trip has seen a spat with London's mayor, meetings with British royals, a state banquet, a sit-down meeting with May and protests.

Trump is now in Ireland, where he's staying at his golf course. He'll later head to France for a ceremony marking the Normandy landings.

We're wrapping up live coverage for the day, but keep reading CNN for more details about Trump's trip.

Here are some of the highlights from Trump's trip to the UK:

1:01 p.m. ET, June 5, 2019

Trump says he's not in Ireland to promote golf club

President Trump (L) meets with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar (R) at Shannon Airport in Shannon, Ireland on June 5, 2019.
President Trump (L) meets with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar (R) at Shannon Airport in Shannon, Ireland on June 5, 2019. MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump defended his stay in Ireland saying his trip is not to promote his golf club but about the US-Ireland relationship.

An Irish reporter asked Trump if the visit to Ireland is just to "promote" his golf course.

Here's what Trump said:

"No. This trip is really about great relationships that we have with the UK and I really wanted to do this stop in Ireland. It was very important to me because of the relationship I have with the people and your prime minister." 

Trump also boasted his "great relationship" with Ireland, saying, "We have millions of Irish (in the US) and I think I know most of them, because they're my friends. We love the Irish."

When confronted with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar's previous comments that his views on climate change were "reckless," Trump said he hadn't "heard those comments" adding, "We have the cleanest air in the world in the United States and it's gotten better since I'm president."

Trump also said he was "looking at" granting Irish citizens access to the E3 visa.

12:28 p.m. ET, June 5, 2019

Here's what Trump's doing in Ireland

President Trump is seen during his meeting with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at Shannon Airport in Shannon, Ireland on June 5, 2019.
President Trump is seen during his meeting with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar at Shannon Airport in Shannon, Ireland on June 5, 2019. MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Irish officials have taken notice of President Trump’s first low-key visit as President to Ireland as being more about pleasure than work. 

An Irish official says it appears this trip is more about downtime for the President. It could also be an easier way for him to visit Ireland without facing protests if it was a more formal visit with events in Dublin.

The official said as of now the President, who will be spending two nights at his golf resort, is scheduled to play golf on Friday, but the weather could be an issue.

Additionally, acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney is expected to host a dinner at Doonbeg Thursday evening with Irish officials, including the ambassador to Ireland. Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar is not expected to be there. 

Soon after arriving in Ireland, Trump met with Varadkar at the airport.

12:12 p.m. ET, June 5, 2019

Trump: I think Brexit will "work out very well" and it could be "very, very good" for Ireland

President Trump, in a meeting with Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar, said he thinks everything will "work out" when it comes to Brexit.

"I just left some very good people that are very much involved with Brexit," he said. "I think it will all work out, It will all work out very well."

A reporter asked Trump if Brexit would be bad for Ireland. Here's what Trump said:

“The big thing is going to be your border and hopefully that will work out. I think it will work out. There are a lot of good minds thinking about how to do it. It’s going to be just fine. I think ultimately it could be very, very good. But the border will work out. ”

Some background: One of the big fears in the Brexit debate is that Britain's departure from the EU will mean the reintroduction of border posts on the frontier between Northern Ireland, which remains part of the UK, and the Republic of Ireland, an EU member. You can read more about the issue here.

12:26 p.m. ET, June 5, 2019

President Trump arrives in Ireland

President Trump (R) and first lady Melania Trump (L) disembark Air Force One upon arrival at Shannon Airport in Shannon, Ireland on June 5, 2019.
President Trump (R) and first lady Melania Trump (L) disembark Air Force One upon arrival at Shannon Airport in Shannon, Ireland on June 5, 2019. MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images

Air Force One is wheels down in Shannon, Ireland — marking the first official visit of President Trump to the country.

At the airport in Shannon, Trump will meet with Ireland's Prime Minister Leo Vardakar, who he has met with twice before in Washington for St. Patrick's Day.

Plans for the visit: Trump is due to meet the Irish prime minister at the airport’s VIP lounge — a compromise venue after the Irish government balked at meeting Trump on his golf property.

Trump will spend Wednesday and Thursday night there at his Trump International Golf & Resort in Doonbeg. Tomorrow, Trump travels to Normandy to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day.  

10:42 a.m. ET, June 5, 2019

The Trumps are officially bound for Ireland after UK state visit

President Trump and the first lady walk off of Marine One to board Air Force One before departing from Southampton Airport, in Southampton, southern England.
President Trump and the first lady walk off of Marine One to board Air Force One before departing from Southampton Airport, in Southampton, southern England. MANDEL NGAN / Contributor

President Trump is departing the United Kingdom after a three-day state visit, which included two banquets, afternoon tea with Prince Charles, government meetings and several encounters with Queen Elizabeth. 

Air Force One took off from Southampton Airport around 10:30 a.m. ET (3:30 p.m. local) en route Shannon, Ireland, where Trump will spend two nights at his golf course around a visit to Normandy to commemorate D Day. 

Upon landing in Ireland, Trump is due to meet the Irish prime minister at the airport’s VIP lounge — a compromise venue after the Irish government balked at meeting Trump on his golf property. 

10:12 a.m. ET, June 5, 2019

President Trump has departed Portsmouth 

President Trump and the first lady have departed Portsmouth after participating in a D-Day commemoration ceremony. 

He’s in Marine One en route Southampton Airport, where he’ll take Air Force One to Shannon, Ireland — ending his three day visit to the United Kingdom.