President Trump in the UK

By Meg Wagner, Brian Ries, James Masters and Veronica Rocha, CNN
8:12 p.m. ET, July 13, 2018
7:18 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

Trump says he feels "unwelcome" in London

From CNN’s Sebastian Shukla in London

President Donald Trump listens to a question during a news conference before departing the NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium, Thursday, July 12, 2018.

President Donald Trump said in an interview with The Sun that he feels "unwelcome” in London.

“I used to love London as a city. I haven’t been there in a long time. But when they make you feel unwelcome, why would I stay there?” the President told the newspaper.

Addressing the issue of the giant inflatable “Trump baby” that will fly above London on Friday, he said, “I guess when they put out blimps to make me feel unwelcome, no reason for me to go to London.”

Trump did say, however, that the British public like him and that “many people are delighted."

6:55 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

Trump: London mayor has done a "terrible job"

From CNN’s Sebastian Shukla in London

President Trump has continued his feud with London Mayor Sadiq Khan in an interview with the British newspaper The Sun.

Trump said Khan had “done a very bad job on terrorism” and a “terrible job in London.”

“I think he has done a bad job on crime, if you look, all of the horrible things going on there, with all of the crime that is being brought in,” Trump told The Sun.

Trump also took issue with the fact that he felt Khan had not been respectful to him.

He continued: “I think he has not been hospitable to a government that is very important. Now he might not like the current President, but I represent the United States. I also represent a lot of people in Europe because a lot of people from Europe are in the United States.”

Some background: Long before Trump became president, he was trading barbs with Khan. After Khan was elected as London's first Muslim mayor in 2016, he frequently criticized Trump and described his views of Islam as ignorant. Trump called for an IQ test between him and the mayor to determine who's smarter.

The spats continued even after Trump was elected president. In June last year, Trump slammed Khan in a tweet shortly after a terror attack in London.

6:55 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

Boris Johnson would make a "great prime minister," Trump says

From CNN’s Sebastian Shukla in London

President Trump, in an interview covering many topics with The Sun newspaper in the UK, said the former British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson would make “a great prime minister.”

Boris Johnson quit as foreign secretary Monday over a Brexit plan that he did not agree with.

Trump described Johnson as “a very talented guy.”

He continued: "I have a lot of respect for Boris. He obviously likes me, and says very good things about me. I was very saddened to see he was leaving government and I hope he goes back in at some point. I think he is a great representative for your country.”

Trump refused to be drawn into saying if Johnson should replace Theresa May as prime minister.

“I am not pitting one against the other," he told The Sun. "I am just saying I think he would be a great Prime Minister. I think he’s got what it takes.”
8:20 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

Trump says Theresa May "didn't listen" to his advice on Brexit deal

From CNN’s Eli Watkins

President Donald Trump touched down in the United Kingdom Thursday and spoke with a major British tabloid where he differed with British Prime Minister Theresa May on her approach to Brexit.

"I told her how to do it. That will be up to her to say. But I told her how to do it. She wanted to go a different route," Trump said, according to audio of an interview posted by The Sun.

Trump said May "didn't listen" to his views on how she should negotiate the UK's exit from the European Union, but said that was "fine." 

"She should negotiate the best way she knows how, but it's too bad what's going on," Trump said. 

Trump's comments in the interview are an extraordinary criticism of a foreign leader during a trip to that leader's country. Trump was greeted by May in a ceremony full of pomp and circumstance Thursday evening just hours before the interview was released.

5:29 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

British prime minister cites states that Trump won in 2016 in her speech

From CNN's Jeff Zeleny

First lady Melania Trump, US President Donald Trump and Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May stand on the steps of the Great Court at Blenheim Palace on July 12, 2018.

Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Texas were also mentioned in British Prime Minister Theresa May’s speech Thursday night at Blenheim Palace.

What do they have in common? President Trump carried all four states in the 2016 presidential election. May is trying to make clear trade relationships are mutually beneficial.

Here's what May said:

"Tomorrow morning, around 24,000 men and women in Michigan will get up and go to work for a UK-owned company. Another 40,000 will do the same in Ohio. Sixty thousand in Pennsylvania. In Texas, British employers provide work for an incredible 100,000 people. Altogether, from Maine to Alaska, more than a million Americans work for British companies."
4:56 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

These protesters sang about Trump's travel ban outside the palace

From CNN's Christina Zdanowicz

A group of protesters at a rally outside Blenheim Palace Thursday lent their voices to deliver a message to President Trump.

Karin Fremer, who joined the protest, took this video of the demonstrators singing, "Tweet, tweet, tweet. His travel bans cause chaos, the protests went worldwide."

5:18 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

5 key quotes from Theresa May's speech

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May (L) shakes hands with US President Donald Trump (R) as she welcomes Trump and his wife US First Lady Melania Trump for a black-tie dinner with business leaders at Blenheim Palace on July 12, 2018.

British Prime Minister Theresa May spoke at a dinner with President Trump and key business leaders Thursday night. Here are a few key lines from the address:

On the US and UK's friendship: "Time and again, the common threads that hold us together — our shared history, our shared values, our shared language and culture — conspire to inspire mutual respect, and to make the United States and the United Kingdom not just the closest of allies, but the dearest of friends."

On confronting Russia: "As was the case in Churchill’s time, and in many years before and since, it’s there in our joint efforts to protect our shared security — whether through targeting Daesh [ISIS] terrorists or standing up to Russian aggression."

On co-investment: "As the largest investors in each other’s economies, with over a trillion dollars of investments between us, the US and UK do an incredible amount of business together. Thousands of US companies have a home in the UK, providing jobs for over million people here. And the strength and breadth of Britain’s contribution to the US economy cannot be understated. The UK is the largest investor in the US, providing nearly a fifth of all foreign investment in your country."

On British companies that employ Americans: "There are thousands of British employers with a long-term presence in the US, providing well-paid work and driving economic growth in every state ... Tomorrow morning, around 24,000 men and women in Michigan will get up and go to work for a UK-owned company ... Another 40,000 will do the same in Ohio. Sixty thousand in Pennsylvania. In Texas, British employers provide work for an incredible 100,000 people. Altogether, from Maine to Alaska, more than a million Americans work for British companies."

On leaving the EU: "Now, as we prepare to leave the European Union, we have an unprecedented opportunity to do more. It’s an opportunity to reach a free trade agreement that creates jobs and growth here in the UK and right across the United States ... It’s also an opportunity to tear down the bureaucratic barriers that frustrate business leaders on both sides of the Atlantic."

4:04 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

British prime minister touts US-UK economic relationship

US President Donald Trump, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and her husband Philip May stand on steps in the Great Court at Blenheim Palace, west of London, on July 12, 2018.

British Prime Minister Theresa May, in remarks at tonight's dinner at Blenheim Palace, touted the UK's business relationship with the US.

"As the largest investors in each other’s economies, with over a trillion dollars of investments between us, the US and UK do an incredible amount of business together," she said, according to a statement from the UK government.

She mentioned Brexit, framing it as an "unprecedented opportunity" to further strengthen relationships.

"Now, as we prepare to leave the European Union, we have an unprecedented opportunity to do more," she said. "It’s an opportunity to reach a free trade agreement that creates jobs and growth here in the UK and right across the United States ... It’s also an opportunity to tear down the bureaucratic barriers that frustrate business leaders on both sides of the Atlantic.

Business leaders from a range of sectors are attending tonight's dinner.

3:25 p.m. ET, July 12, 2018

What Melania Trump wore to the Blenheim Palace dinner

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May and her husband Philip May greet President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump at Blenheim Palace on July 12, 2018.

First lady Melania Trump is wearing a canary yellow J. Mendel dress to Thursday's formal dinner at Blenheim Palace.

She is also wearing Manolo Blahnik heels, CNN's Kate Bennett reported. President Trump wore a tuxedo to the dinner hosted by Prime Minister Theresa May.

The State Trumpeters of the Household Cavalry Band performed for the Trumps, May and her husband, Philip May, before they headed into the palace for dinner.