Follow President Trump's rally in Wisconsin

9:03 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

Trump blames opponents and media

President Donald Trump pointed the finger Wednesday night at Democrats and the news media for the turbulent national political environment, on the same day explosive devices were mailed to the Obamas, the Clintons, CNN and other public officials.

Trump took no responsibility for the tone of the political discourse.

During a rally in Wisconsin, the President promised to bring those responsible for mailing the explosive devices to justice.

"Any acts or threats of political violence are an attack on our democracy itself. No nation can succeed that tolerates violence or the threat of violence as a method of political intimidation, corrosion or control, we all know that. Such conduct much be fiercely opposed and firmly prosecuted," he said.

"We want all sides to come together in peace and harmony. We can do it. We can do it. We can do it. It'll happen."

Then he pivoted, saying those in the political arena "must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective."

"The language of moral condemnation and destructive, routine -- these are arguments and disagreements that have to stop," he said.

He complained of "mobs" -- a reference to protesters, who opposed Brett Kavanaugh's Supreme Court nomination and confronted Republican senators on Capitol Hill, and who have challenged GOP lawmakers and Trump Cabinet officials at restaurants and in public.

"No one should carelessly compare political opponents to historical villains, which is done often and all the time. It's got to stop. We should not mob people in public spaces or destroy public property. There is one way to settle our disagreements -- it's called peacefully, at the ballot box. That's what we want," Trump said.

He then said it's the news media's responsibility to set the national political tone.

"The media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and oftentimes false attacks and stories. Have to do it," he said.

Trump took no responsibility for his own rhetoric -- which has included attacks on news outlets and Democratic opponents, as well as moments like a recent rally in Montana where he praised a Republican congressman who pleaded guilty to charges stemming from his body-slamming a reporter.

9:47 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

Trump calls on media to stop "endless hostility"

President Donald Trump vowed an “aggressive investigation" into the attempted attacks on former Presidents Clinton and Obama, as well as other former government officials and CNN.

“Any acts or threats of political violence are an attack on our democracy itself. No nation can succeed that tolerates violence or the threat of violence as a method of political intimidation or coercion or control, we all know that. Such conduct must be fiercely opposed and firmly prosecuted,” he said.

But he then pivoted to calling for people on “all sides” to come together.

“For example, those engaged in the political arena must stop treating political opponents as being morally defective. Have to do that," he said.

Trump continued: "The language of moral condemnation and destructive routine, these are arguments and disagreements that have to stop. No one should carelessly compare political opponents to historical villains, which is done often, it’s done all the time. Gotta stop. We should not mob people in public spaces or destroy public property. There is one way to settle our disagreements, it’s called peacefully at the ballot box."

 And then he had a message for the media.

“As part of a larger national effort to bridge our divides and bring people together, the media also has a responsibility to set a civil tone and to stop the endless hostility and constant negative and oftentimes false attacks and stories. Have to do it,” he said to applause, adding, “They’ve gotta stop. Bring people together.”

8:13 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

Trump: "Any acts or threats of political violence are an attack on our democracy"

President Trump opened tonight's rally by addressing the bombs and suspicious package that were intercepted.

"My highest duty, as you know, as President, is to keep America safe. That's what we talk about. That's what we do," he said. "The federal government is conducting an aggressive investigation and we will find those responsible and we will bring them to justice. Hopefully very quickly. Any acts or threats of political violence are an attack on our democracy, itself."

Trump continued: "No nation can succeed that tolerates violence or the threat of violence as a method of political intimidation, coercion, or control. We all know that. Such conduct must be fiercely opposed and firmly prosecuted. We want all sides to come together in peace and harmony. We can do it. We can do it. We can do it. It will happen."

8:00 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

NOW: Trump takes the stage at his rally

President Trump just arrived at the Central Wisconsin Airport in Mosinee for his campaign rally.

He is campaigning for embattled Republican Gov. Scott Walker and state Sen. Leah Vukmir who is looking to unseat Democratic Sen. Tammy Baldwin in November.

As Vukmir spoke during the rally earlier this evening, the crowd chanted "Lock Her Up" at the mention of Hillary Clinton.

The chant comes hours after authorities intercepted a bomb intended for Clinton. The package intended for Clinton was addressed to her in Chappaqua residence in Westchester County, New York, on Tuesday, authorities said.

7:43 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

Paul Ryan calls attempted attack an "act of terrorism"

House Speaker Paul Ryan called Wednesday's attempted attack an "act of terrorism."

"Let me just say something that needs to be said on a day like today," Ryan told a crowd at a campaign rally in Mosinee, Wisconsin. He shushed the group as they began to chant "Build the wall." 

"Did you see the news this morning about these devices?" he asked, as the crowd calmed down.

"That is an act of terrorism. There is no place for that in our democracy," Ryan said. "We reject that, and I just want to say thank God for our law enforcement who is doing this day in and day out to keep us safe."

President Trump is expected to take the stage soon.

Earlier today, Trump said "the full weight of our government" is investigating the packages and will "bring those responsible for these despicable acts to justice."

7:22 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

Wisconsin governor tweets: "An attempted terrorist act against any American is an attack against all Americans"

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker tweeted ahead of President Trump's rally today about bombs that were intercepted.

Here's what he said:

7:12 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

Suspicious packages were sent to CNN, the Clintons, the Obamas and Eric Holder

Authorities have intercepted bombs intended for former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, and several other top political figures were targeted in what authorities are investigating as a connected series of incidents.

A suspicious package sent to the Florida office of Democratic Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz was intended for former Attorney General Eric Holder but had the wrong address, two law enforcement sources said. It was returned to the Democratic congresswoman because that was the return label on the package, the sources said,

CNN's New York bureau in the Time Warner Center was also evacuated Wednesday after a package containing a bomb, addressed to former CIA Director John Brennan, was discovered, city and local law enforcement officials said.

In addition...

  • Sources told CNN that a suspicious package intended for California Democratic Rep. Maxine Waters was intercepted at a congressional mail screening facility in Maryland.
  • The San Diego Union-Tribune evacuated its building after "suspicious looking packages" were spotted outside.

The developments, which unfolded rapidly and continued steadily into the afternoon, touched off fear and confusion and immediately invited questions about the motives of those responsible. The recipients of the packages are all prominent targets of right-wing criticism and, in many cases, of President Donald Trump himself.

7:00 p.m. ET, October 24, 2018

President Trump holds campaign rally in Wisconsin as probe into bombs continues

President Trump is delivering remarks in Mosinee, Wisconsin, at a campaign rally after authorities intercepted bombs intended for former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton

Earlier today, Trump received briefings on the suspicious packages targeting several high ranking Democratic leaders and CNN in the residence of the White House, where he spent most of his morning. 

Trump, speaking at an event aimed at combatting opioid abuse, addressed the packages.

"This egregious conduct is abhorrent to everything we hold dear and sacred as Americans," he said.