The latest on President Trump's impeachment

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1:46 p.m. ET, January 9, 2020

Trump says he has "no problem" with Bolton testifying but wants to "protect presidential privilege"

Sergei Gapon/AFP/Getty Images
Sergei Gapon/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump weighed in today on former national security adviser John Bolton’s announcement that he is willing to testify in a Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed, saying he wouldn’t stop it but he’d have to ask his lawyers.

“I always got along with him, he didn’t really get along with some of our people, but that’s really going to be up to the Senate,” Trump said.

“I don’t stop it, no,” Trump said, but added, “I’d have to ask the lawyers.”

He continued: “I would have no problem, other than we have to protect — we have to be able to protect — people can’t go up and say whatever my thoughts are … We don’t want that to be out so we have to protect presidential privilege.”

11:53 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

Trump says he's open to witnesses in Senate impeachment trial

Asked if he'd like to see witnesses testify at an impeachment trial, Trump said, "I'm going to leave it to the Senate," before listing off a group of people who he'd like to hear from.

Speaking at an announcement of proposed National Environmental Policy Act regulations at the White House, the President went on to list all of the witnesses he’d like to see during a trial.

That included the whistleblower, House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff, Hunter Biden, and Joe Biden, “and some others,” including “the informer that never showed up” and the “second whistleblower.”

11:41 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

Pelosi says she'll miss the Niners playoff game: “I have, unfortunately, responsibilities to save our country from peril”

As she wrapped up her weekly news conference, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi was asked if she would attend the San Francisco 49ers' NFL playoff game this weekend.

"It would be my intention to go," she said. "I have, unfortunately, responsibilities to save our country from peril."

Some in the briefing room laughed at the remark. Pelosi did not elaborate on what "peril" exactly means.

Tensions between the US and Iran escalated this week following a US airstrike that killed Iran's top general. The House is expected to vote today on legislation that could restrain Trump's ability to launch military action against Iran.

Meanwhile, Pelosi is also holding onto the articles of impeachment against President Trump. She has not yet sent them to the Senate, which will hold a trial and determine if he should be removed from office after the articles are formally transmitted.

11:15 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

Pelosi on impeachment articles: "I'll send them over when I'm ready"

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi was just asked if she plans to hold the articles of impeachment "indefinitely."

Here's how she responded:

"No, I'm not withholding them indefinitely. I'll send them over when I'm ready. And that will probably be soon."
11:11 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

Pelosi still doesn't say when she plans to send impeachment articles

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi repeated some Democrats' request that the Senate outline its protocols for the impeachment trial before she formally transmit the articles over.

"Now, in terms of impeachment, you all keep asking me the same question, and I keep giving you the same answer," she said.

Pelosi has given no indication for when she could send the articles of impeachment over. Lawmakers close to Pelosi insist they have been given no sense of when she will tee up the vote on the House managers to transmit the articles to the Senate.

"As I said right from the start, we need to see the arena in which we're sending our managers. Is that too much to ask?" she asked at a news conference today.

10:34 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

SOON: Nancy Pelosi takes questions

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi will have her weekly news conference at 10:45 a.m. ET. Reporters will likely ask her questions about the articles of impeachment, which the House has approved but not yet sent to the Senate.

Lawmakers close to Pelosi insist they have been given no sense of when Pelosi will tee up the vote on the House managers to transmit the articles to the Senate.

However, in the words of one senior House Democrat: “We’re all working under the assumption it’s coming this week.” 

10:30 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

Democratic congressman: "We should do everything we can to force the Senate to have a fair trial"

Rep. Adam Smith, a Democrat from Washington state, has walked back his comments about the timing of the articles of impeachment handover.

On CNN's "New Day" earlier this morning, the chairman of the House Armed Services Committee said he believed it was time to send the articles to the Senate. 

"I do believe we should do everything we can to force the Senate to have a fair trial. If the Speaker believes that holding on to the articles for a longer time will help force a fair trial in the Senate, then I wholeheartedly support that decision," he tweeted now/

Here are his tweets:

9:55 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

This swing district Democrat thinks it's time to send over articles

Rep. Ben McAdams of Utah, a freshman from a swing district, told CNN: “I think it’s time” to send over the articles.

9:49 a.m. ET, January 9, 2020

House Democrats say they're close to sending impeachment articles to Senate

Two key House Democrats indicated today there was not going to be an indefinite delay to turning over the articles of impeachment, signaling they were close to being sent over to the Senate. 

House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said, “no,” there won’t be an indefinite delay.

And Rep. Jamie Raskin, a member of the House Judiciary committee, defended House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s strategy on holding the articles thus far, but said:

“There can’t be an indefinite delay. Obviously there’s a constitutional and political clock ticking at this point. We’re very eager to see that things move forward. Our report accompanying the articles of impeachment says the President constitutes a clear and present danger to American constitutional system ... We have to move forward on a basis that does justice to what the Constitution provides.”