The latest on Trump's Covid-19 diagnosis

By Meg Wagner, Melissa Mahtani and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 8:23 a.m. ET, October 8, 2020
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3:26 p.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Antibody treatment could have affected Trump's blood test, pharmaceutical company says

From CNN's Amanda Sealy and Maggie Fox

President Donald Trump leaves Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, heading towards Marine One on October 5.
President Donald Trump leaves Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, heading towards Marine One on October 5. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Regeneron, the company that makes the experimental treatment given to President Trump last week, told CNN their antibody treatment could have affected the blood test that shows Trump has antibodies to the coronavirus.

Earlier today the President’s physician, Dr. Sean Conley, released a memo on the President’s health. In it, he said Trump had "detectable levels" of coronavirus antibodies as of Monday. 

“Of note today, the President’s labs demonstrated detectable levels of SARS-Cov-2 IgG antibodies from labs drawn Monday, October 5th; initial IgG levels drawn late Thursday were undetectable,” the memo read. 

Trump received a single infusion of Regeneron’s dual monoclonal antibody treatment on Friday. The company said the IgG antibody test would have detected the engineered antibodies that were administered to Trump.

Those antibodies – laboratory versions of immune system proteins designed to home in directly on specific parts of the coronavirus – would remain detectable in his system for several months.

In a statement to CNN, Regeneron said:

"Most of the standard assays for IgG would not distinguish between endogenous (self-made) antibodies and the ones delivered by our therapy. However, given the volume of IgG antibodies delivered in our therapy, and the timing of these tests, it is likely that the second test is detecting REGN-COV2 antibodies. 
Our early data announced last week shows that the patients most likely to benefit from this treatment have a similar profile to President Trump, in that they had undetectable antibodies at baseline (‘seronegative’) and were early in the course of disease. Treatment with REGN-COV2 had the greatest impact in viral load reduction and time to symptom alleviation in this seronegative group. We also know by looking at the placebo groups that these seronegative patients were at a much higher risk of requiring further medical attention than ‘seropositive’ patients when untreated with therapeutic antibodies."
1:04 p.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Trump feels "great!" and is "symptom-free," his doctor says

From CNN's Betsy Klein

White House physician Dr. Sean Conley speaks on October 5 at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland.
White House physician Dr. Sean Conley speaks on October 5 at Walter Reed Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The President’s physician Dr. Sean Conley has released a new memorandum on the President’s status, claiming President Trump has been “symptom-free for over 24 hours.”

Trump, Conley wrote, “has not needed nor received any supplemental oxygen since initial hospitalization,” and has been “fever-free for more than 4 days.”

Trump’s labs, Conley said, “demonstrated detectable levels of SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies from labs drawn Monday.”

Trump told him he feels “great!” Conley wrote, including an exclamation point. 

Conley has not briefed reporters since Monday.

Read the memo:

12:50 p.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Pences test negative ahead of vice presidential debate

From CNN's Betsy Klein

Vice President Mike Pence holds hands with Karen Pence at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, on October 5.
Vice President Mike Pence holds hands with Karen Pence at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, on October 5. Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Both Vice President Mike Pence and second lady Karen Pence have tested negative for Covid-19 ahead of this evening’s debate, an administration official confirms. 

12:33 p.m. ET, October 7, 2020

The second presidential debate will depend on Trump's health and whether debate crew can be safe around him

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

President Donald Trump stands on the Truman Balcony after returning to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 5 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump stands on the Truman Balcony after returning to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 5 in Washington, DC. Win McNamee/Getty Images

The Commission on Presidential Debate is still planning for the second presidential debate, co-chair of Frank Fahrenkopf said Wednesday. However, it’s not without concern. Everything depends on the President’s health status and whether people around him, including the commission’s crew, will be safe, he told CNN.

“It’s going to depend on what the doctors say about his health, whether or not only will he be safe, but the people around him be safe,” he said. “We're concerned about our staff and workers here. We have a crew of about 65 people who work on these things. So it's going to depend on what the medical evidence is and what the advice we get whether or not it's safe to go forward.”

“We're going forward with our planning for both the second and final one in Nashville,” Fahrenkopf added. “We will make decisions and spend time after [the vice presidential debate] is in the can tonight as to what we're going to do for the next one, once we get that advice."

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said Tuesday that the second presidential debate should not be held if President Donald Trump is still infected with coronavirus, but that he would base his participation in the debate upon recommendations from medical experts.

Watch:

10:52 a.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Covid-19 affected 17 members of this nurse's family. She hopes Trump takes the virus seriously.

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

CNN
CNN

While President Trump has been downplaying the coronavirus pandemic, Julia Jimenez, a health care worker who has been treating coronavirus patients since the pandemic began, has been strained at work and at home.

The coronavirus has affected 17 members of her family.

“I [looked] at my patients every day, like I would hate it if that was my family member, and now it is.”

Meanwhile, Jimenez said she has been living in hotels since March and isolating from her parents and her son to reduce their risk of exposure to the virus.

“I don’t sleep very well. I’m very, very stressed,” she told CNN’s Miguel Marquez.

The President’s message to Americans about the pandemic only adds to it.

“I think we’re in big trouble and that it’s going to get a lot worse before it gets better,” she said. “I think our country is in bad shape right now and they're getting really bad advice.”

With the President testing positive for the virus, she hopes that he will change his message.

“I hope that he'll change his message to people, saying they really do need to take it seriously and not make so many jokes about not wearing the mask. Like, now you see firsthand how serious it is," she said.

Watch more:

10:32 a.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Harris tests negative for coronavirus

From CNN’s Jasmine Wright

Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Kamala Harris visits the This Is the Place Monument on October 3 in Salt Lake City.
Democratic vice presidential candidate, Sen. Kamala Harris visits the This Is the Place Monument on October 3 in Salt Lake City. Patrick Semansky/AP

Ahead of tonight’s Vice Presidential debate, Sen. Kamala Harris received a negative result after undergoing PCR testing for Covid-19 on Tuesday.

Polymerase chain reaction tests, known as PCR, are the most common and most accurate tests for determining whether someone is currently infected with the novel coronavirus.

10:47 a.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Former Pence aide says she's concerned about him as Covid-19 hits the White House

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

CNN
CNN

A former top aide to Vice President Mike Pence says she's concerned about him as the coronavirus outbreak in the White House continues to grow. Olivia Troye, who was a homeland security adviser to Pence and his lead staffer on the White House's coronavirus task force, said:

“I hope that he has been, you know, isolated and is home and away from a lot of the staff and some of these people who just frankly don't care. I've lived it. I've seen it. I've seen the behavior. It's terrible and it's terrible leadership exhibited by people in the White House who should be setting the example for all Americans on how to protect ourselves and protect each other from getting this virus. It's tragic.”

Some background: Troye has previously slammed the Trump administration’s handling of the pandemic and endorsed Joe Biden for president.

Her criticism of President Trump, accusing him of failing to protect Americans and only caring about his reelection, was particularly striking because of her role working on the coronavirus task force, which Pence leads.

Pence has dismissed her criticism, saying, "it reads to me like one more disgruntled employee who's left the White House and now has decided to play politics during an election year."

Troye told CNN staffers were acting “cavalier and negligent” during her time on the task force and did not take the virus seriously:

“We didn't socially distance, people were not wearing masks,” she said. “They insist on traveling everywhere and they insist on not wearing masks. This is what happens. I'm sure that we are going to see more people that are positive that probably are carrying the virus or probably asymptomatic and just haven't tested positive quite yet.”

9:56 a.m. ET, October 7, 2020

The vice presidential debate is tonight. Here's what you need to know about it.

Workers clean newly installed plexiglass barriers on the stage ahead of the vice presidential debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah on October 6 in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Workers clean newly installed plexiglass barriers on the stage ahead of the vice presidential debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah on October 6 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Seated 12 feet apart, Vice President Mike Pence and his Democratic rival, Sen. Kamala Harris of California, will meet in Utah tonight for the only vice presidential debate of the campaign.

Here's what you need to know about the event:

  • The moderator: Susan Page of USA Today is moderating tonight's debate. She's the first print reporter selected by the Commission on Presidential Debates to moderate a session, and she's interviewed six sitting presidents. However, she has faced some scrutiny for hosting a "Girls Night Out" party for Medicare administrator Seema Verma, a Pence ally, at her home. 
  • The format: There will be nine, 10-minute segments. The commission notes that "The moderator will open each segment with a question, after which each candidate will have two minutes to respond."
  • How the White House coronavirus outbreak is impacting the debate: Debate organizers — in response to the spread of the coronavirus inside the White House and the fact that Pence was at an event that was seemingly the genesis of the White House spread just over a week ago — made a number of changes to their safety protocols, including putting Pence and Harris more than 12 feet apart, using plexiglass as barriers between the candidates and requiring everyone in the audience to wear masks.
  • How you can watch: The debate will be broadcast pretty much anywhere, but please watch CNN or stream at CNN.com
9:35 a.m. ET, October 7, 2020

Biden will visit Nevada and Arizona this week

From CNN’s Arlette Saenz

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks to members of the media before boarding his campaign plane at New Castle Airport in New Castle, Delaware, on October 5.
Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden speaks to members of the media before boarding his campaign plane at New Castle Airport in New Castle, Delaware, on October 5. Andrew Harnik/AP

Joe Biden will travel to Las Vegas, Nevada, on Friday, his first trip to the state as the Democratic nominee, his campaign announced.

This will follow his trip to Arizona on Thursday. 

Biden's trip comes as President Trump continues to recover from coronavirus at the White House.