October 4 Trump Covid-19 news

By Ben Westcott, Brett McKeehan, Adam Renton, Amy Woodyatt, Fernando Alfonso III, Melissa Macaya and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 1:15 p.m. ET, October 5, 2020
63 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
12:00 a.m. ET, October 5, 2020

Our live coverage of President Donald Trump's coronavirus diagnosis has moved here.

11:27 p.m. ET, October 4, 2020

Pelosi says she's not being briefed on Trump's health

From CNN's Paul LeBlanc

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly news conference on October 1 in Washington, DC.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during her weekly news conference on October 1 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Sunday said she has not been briefed on President Donald Trump's health since his Covid-19 diagnosis despite her position as second in the presidential line of succession behind Vice President Mike Pence.

"We're getting our information the way everyone else is — in the media," Pelosi said during an interview on CBS' "Face the Nation."

"But in terms of the succession, that's an ongoing process. Sadly at this time, it comes to the forefront."

Pelosi, who tested negative for Covid-19 on Friday, added that she's praying for "good health" and a "speedy recovery" for Trump while hoping that the episode will serve as "a signal that we really have to do better in preventing the spread of this virus."

Read more:

10:56 p.m. ET, October 4, 2020

President Trump is receiving several different treatments for Covid-19

From CNN's Jacqueline Howard and Lauren Mascarenhas

President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2.
President Donald Trump leaves the White House for Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on October 2. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Donald Trump's physicians are giving him several different treatments — including investigational drugs — in the hope of relieving his Covid-19 symptoms and possibly shortening his course of illness.

While many questions remain about the President's condition and when he was first diagnosed with the coronavirus that causes Covid-19, here is what has been revealed so far about what he was been treated with — and when.

Regeneron's monoclonal antibody therapy: On Friday afternoon, the White House said in a letter that Trump was treated with an 8-gram dose of the experimental antibody therapy cocktail made by the biotechnology company Regeneron. The investigational cocktail, known by its investigational name REGN-COV2, has been in clinical trials since June. 

Remdesivir: President Trump is being given a five-day course of the antiviral drug remdesivir, one of the doctors treating him said during a briefing on Saturday. The treatment is intended to shorten recovery time for Covid-19 patients. In a Phase 3 clinical trial, remdesivir was found to speed recovery in moderately ill patients with pneumonia from Covid-19, according to results published in the medical journal JAMA in August.

Dexamethasone: Trump was given the corticosteroid drug dexamethasone on Saturday after his oxygen level transiently dipped, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said during a briefing on Sunday. The drug is typically given to patients on supplemental oxygen or needing ventilation.

Supplemental oxygen: After previously telling reporters on Saturday that Trump "is not on oxygen right now," White House physician Conley said during a briefing on Sunday that the President had been given supplemental oxygen and had two episodes of transient drops in his oxygen level. Oxygen therapy, or supplemental oxygen, is a treatment that delivers oxygen gas for patients to breathe who may have difficulty breathing.

Read more about Trump's coronavirus treatments:

10:34 p.m. ET, October 4, 2020

Venezuela’s Maduro wishes Trump a "prompt and effective recovery" from Covid-19

From CNN's Marlon Sorto and Sharif Paget in Atlanta 

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro attends a meeting at the Miraflores Palace in Caracas, Venezuela on February 7.
Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro attends a meeting at the Miraflores Palace in Caracas, Venezuela on February 7. Carolina Cabral/Getty Images

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro on Sunday wished US President Donald Trump a "prompt and effective recovery" from coronavirus, despite calling him a “bloody enemy of Venezuela."

In a televised address to the nation, Maduro said that Trump "sadly underestimated all precautionary measures" regarding the virus. He added that Venezuela expresses its "human solidarity" with Trump since "no human being should get infected."

Maduro concluded his message to Trump by saying: "I hope all of this will lead you to be more thoughtful, more humane, for the protection of the people of the United States and to understand the peoples of the world."
10:06 p.m. ET, October 4, 2020

Photos: Inside Amy Coney Barrett's White House reception

From CNN's Dana Bash and Kevin Bohn

First lady Melania Trump applauds Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Oval Office prior to the official announcement on Saturday, September 26.
First lady Melania Trump applauds Judge Amy Coney Barrett in the Oval Office prior to the official announcement on Saturday, September 26. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Redux

Since President Donald Trump announced his positive Covid-19 test, public attention has centered on the Rose Garden ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court announcement and how a number of its attendees have since tested positive.

But there was also a smaller, private reception inside the White House — one that did not include wearing masks and did not include social distancing.

After the public event, dozens of attendees gathered inside the White House's Diplomatic Reception Room and the adjoining hallway. The reception lasted between 30 and 45 minutes, one source with knowledge of the event told CNN.

CNN is told the attendees did not wear masks, and pictures of the event show no social distancing.

Pictures of the reception taken by the New York Times' photographer Doug Mills and White House photographer Andrea Hanks capture a group of people talking very close together, with one image showing first lady Melania Trump, Barrett and her family posing shoulder to shoulder and directly behind Trump in the Oval Office.

Barrett talks with Maureen Scalia, wife of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.
Barrett talks with Maureen Scalia, wife of late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Redux

US Sen. Mike Lee and his wife, Sharon, chat with Barrett. Lee has tested positive since the reception.
US Sen. Mike Lee and his wife, Sharon, chat with Barrett. Lee has tested positive since the reception. Doug Mills/The New York Times/Redux

President Donald Trump smiles while chatting with Barrett's children.
President Donald Trump smiles while chatting with Barrett's children. Andrea Hanks/White House

See more photos from the reception:

9:54 p.m. ET, October 4, 2020

White House sends first email about coronavirus since Trump tested positive

From CNN’s Kaitlan Collins

The White House is seen on Sunday evening, October 4 in Washington, DC.
The White House is seen on Sunday evening, October 4 in Washington, DC. Jacquelyn Martin/AP

The White House Management Office just sent its first staff-wide email since President Trump tested positive for coronavirus early Friday morning.

Until now, staffers had gotten no word about whether to come into work or to remain home given several of their colleagues tested positive for coronavirus. Stunningly, the email states they should not contact the White House testing office if they have symptoms.  

"As a reminder, if you are experiencing any symptoms such as sore throat, cough, fever, headache, new loss of taste or small, muscle aches, chills, diarrhea, or difficulty breathing, please stay home and do not come to work until you are free of symptoms," the email, viewed by CNN, read. 

"Affected staff should inform their supervisors and seek care from their primary care provider."

The email instructed staff to go home if they develop symptoms and contact their primary care provider about getting tested. 

"Staff��should not go to the White House Medical Unit clinic for any Covid-19 testing inquiries," the email read. 

Officials with possible exposure to someone who has Covid-19 were told to notify the management office and "ONLY return to work when you have been cleared by the White House Medical Unit."

8:36 a.m. ET, October 5, 2020

No events on White House schedule for Monday

From CNN’s Allie Malloy and Maeve Reston

President Trump has no events on his schedule for Monday as he continues to be hospitalized at Walter Reed medical center.

Earlier today, Dr. Brian Garibaldi, who is part of President Trump's medical team, said the President could be discharged from Walter Reed as early as Monday.

Trump completed a second dose of remdesivir on Saturday and "today he feels well," Garibaldi said.

"He has been up and around. Our plan today is to have him eat and drink, be up out of bed," Garibaldi said. "[I]f he continues to look and feel as well as he does today our hope is to plan for a discharge as early as tomorrow to the White House where he can continue his treatment course."

Trump left the hospital with his security detail late Sunday afternoon so he could ride in a SUV past supporters cheering him on outside of Walter Reed. Trump waved to his supporters through the window while wearing a mask in the back of his SUV.

9:38 p.m. ET, October 4, 2020

At least 7 people who attended Supreme Court announcement have tested positive for Covid-19 

From CNN's Maeve Reston

President Donald Trump announces Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court at the White House on September 26 in Washington, DC.
President Donald Trump announces Judge Amy Coney Barrett as his nominee to the Supreme Court at the White House on September 26 in Washington, DC. Alex Brandon/AP

Many of President Trump's aides or contacts who have recently tested positive for Covid-19 attended the White House festivities honoring Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett on September 26, in the Rose Garden.

At least seven people attending the event, including the President and first lady, have tested positive. University of Notre Dame President the Rev. John Jenkins, former counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway and Republican Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Thom Tillis of North Carolina, who were seated relatively close to each other, tested positive.

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie also tested positive and checked himself into the hospital Saturday as a precautionary measure, because he has asthma.

Conway, Christie, Trump's senior adviser Hope Hicks and his campaign manager Bill Stepien — who have all tested positive — were also all involved in debate prep ahead of Trump's Tuesday clash with Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

It "seems highly likely this originated at the SCOTUS announcement last week," a senior administration official told CNN's Jake Tapper of the outbreak among GOP officials. "It may have come from the Hill. The next major concern will be securing Capitol Hill and protecting lawmakers," the official added.

Trump did not address anyone else's diagnosis during a video message from Walter Reed Saturday.

As he praised the medical care he had received at Walter Reed, he sought to spin his hospitalization to his advantage by making it sound like his diagnosis had been inevitable, even though he took few precautions to prevent it.

Read more here.

8:37 a.m. ET, October 5, 2020

Walter Reed attending physician slams Trump motorcade photo op: "The irresponsibility is astounding"

From CNN's Kevin Bohn and Josiah Ryan

A non-military attending physician at Walter Reed National Medical Center harshly criticized President Trump’s motorcade photo op as something which could endanger lives of Secret Service agents who accompanied him in his SUV.

“Every single person in the vehicle during that completely unnecessary Presidential 'drive-by' just now has to be quarantined for 14 days. They might get sick. They may die. For political theater. Commanded by Trump to put their lives at risk for theater. This is insanity,” Dr. James Phillips tweeted. 

Phillips has been an attending physician for almost three years at Walter Reed medical center and is also a board certified emergency medicine physician and assistant professor at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, D.C.

“That Presidential SUV is not only bulletproof, but hermetically sealed against chemical attack. The risk of COVID19 transmission inside is as high as it gets outside of medical procedures. The irresponsibility is astounding. My thoughts are with the Secret Service forced to play,” Phillips tweeted. 

The White House released a statement this evening saying that "appropriate precautions" were taken for Trump's motorcade and that the movement "was cleared by the medical team as safe to do.”

Speaking with CNN's Wolf Blitzer this evening, Phillips, who has not participated in the care of the President, went on to say it was unlikely the President's motorcade had been approved by medical professionals without outside political influence.

"That's not standard practice by any means and I have a hard time believing that without undo influence, based on their chain of command, that those physicians would have cleared that," he said of the President's motorcade.

"When we take care of patients in the emergency department, or in the thousands of hours I've spent in the inpatient wards and surgery and medicine and ICU, we don't let the patients leave the hospital when they're sick, unless they sign out against medical advice," he added. "...The idea that this would be cleared without any medical indication is absurd."

See his tweets:

Watch Phillips' interview on CNN: