Joe Biden elected president

By Meg Wagner, Fernando Alfonso III, Melissa Macaya, Melissa Mahtani, Veronica Rocha and Amanda Wills, CNN

Updated 10:29 a.m. ET, November 8, 2020
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10:19 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

New results expected out of Philadelphia in the next few hours

From CNN's Kate Bolduan, Mark Morales and Aaron Cooper

A Philadelphia election worker processes mail-in and absentee ballots for the 2020 general election in the United States at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Tuesday, Nov. 3, in Philadelphia.
A Philadelphia election worker processes mail-in and absentee ballots for the 2020 general election in the United States at the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Tuesday, Nov. 3, in Philadelphia. Matt Slocum/AP

A Philadelphia city official told CNN that 2,000-3,000 more ballots should be counted by noon today. 

Another source says the results will be reported between 11 a.m. and as late as early afternoon.

CNN's Kate Bolduan reports from Philadelphia:

10:10 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Expect more more Philadelphia vote totals "sometime today," city official says

From CNN's Ellie Kaufman

Election workers count ballots on November 4, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Election workers count ballots on November 4, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Philadelphia City Commissioner Omar Sabir said more results on ballots in Philadelphia County would come “sometime today,” and that ballots can’t be processed “like a microwave dinner.” 

When pressed, he did not give more specific details on timing. 

“Okay, it’ll be at some point today. Stay tuned,” Sabir said while speaking to CNN’s John Berman and Phil Mattingly.

Sabir said workers are going through about 20,000 “problem child” ballots now. These are ballots that have issues with them – such as missing a signature or having a wrong date. These ballots must be reviewed and then decided on whether or not they can be counted by a panel of three commissioners. Then there are about 18,000 provisional ballots issued on Election Day to count, Sabir said.

“Again, you know, we have approximately about… 40,000 or so votes. Again, we have 20,000 of those ballots and then 18,000 or so of the provisional ballots. So again, so we’re going to try our best to get the problem childs, the problematic ballots,” Sabir said.

Sabir encouraged people to remain calm and be patient while the county works to finish the count.

“It’s not like a microwave dinner. It’s not like you just throw around and get instant gratification. It takes time, we’re going to be meticulous. We’re going to be accurate. You know, believe me, I want to go home just as much as everyone else wants to go home, but we have to take our time. We have to do it right,” Sabir said.  

Philadelphia city commissioner gives update on latest ballot count:

9:21 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Here's why Pennsylvania could decide the election

A Luzerne County worker canvases ballots that arrived after closing of voting until Friday at 5 p.m. and postmarked by Nov. 3rd as vote counting in the general election continues, Friday, Nov. 6, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
A Luzerne County worker canvases ballots that arrived after closing of voting until Friday at 5 p.m. and postmarked by Nov. 3rd as vote counting in the general election continues, Friday, Nov. 6, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Mary Altaffer/AP

The state of Pennsylvania has 20 electoral votes — if President Trump fails win it, he cannot reach the crucial 270 necessary to secure the presidency.

Based on the states CNN has projected so far, Biden currently leads Trump by 253 to 213 electoral votes.

With a win in Pennsylvania, Biden would be over the 270 electoral vote threshold. But Biden can also hit 270 without the Keystone State via a combination of the other states that have not been called but he is currently leading in.

A combination of winning at least two states of these three states — Arizona, Georgia and Nevada — would get Biden into the White House.

Remember: CNN has not yet projected a winner in Pennsylvania.

CNN's Phil Mattingly breaks down latest Pennsylvania numbers:

8:58 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Federal Election Commission official: "There really has been no evidence of fraud"

Commissioner of the Federal Election Commission, Ellen Weintraub
Commissioner of the Federal Election Commission, Ellen Weintraub CNN

Ellen Weintraub, with the Federal Election Commission, wants Americans to know that "there really has been no evidence of fraud" in the election this year.

"State and local officials and poll workers throughout the country really stepped up. And there have been very few complaints about how this election was run," Weintraub told CNN Saturday morning. "Very few substantiated complaints, let me put it that way. There is no evidence of any kind of voter fraud. There is no evidence of illegal votes being cast. In fact, and you don't have to take my word for it, because people throughout the country, nonpartisan election experts, have come out and handled this election and how it was run."

Weintraub added: "There really has been no evidence of fraud. None of the complaints have attached any evidence of fraud."

FEC official discusses election security:

8:56 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

"Problem child ballots" are slowing down counting in Philadelphia

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Election workers count ballots on November 4, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Election workers count ballots on November 4, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Workers at Philadelphia’s convention center are blaming the “problem child ballots” for slowing the counting process, CNN's Kate Bolduan reports.

“The group of ballots that they're dealing with here in Philadelphia, they require extra attention. They require more review,” she said, adding that there are about 20,000 of these ballots to wade through.

Overnight, around 60 workers were prepping these ballots for review. That includes “grouping those 'problem child ballots' into buckets to address a specific issue at hand,” Bolduan reported.

The review process should have begun already per the schedule and while there are also some 18,000 provisional ballots to be counted, workers are entirely focused on getting through these “problem child ballots.” While some updates can be expected today, it is unclear how many of these ballots the workers will be able to get through and when, she added.

CNN's Kate Bolduan reports from Philadelphia:

8:34 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Election worker in hiding after threats related to video of him crumpling piece of paper, official says

From CNN’s Pervaiz Shallwani

An Atlanta-area election worker is in hiding after receiving threats related to a viral video that shows him crumpling and throwing away a piece of paper, leading to false accusations of him tossing out a ballot, a local election official said in a press conference Friday night.

Richard Barron, the Fulton County, Georgia Director of Registration and Elections Barron said officials reviewed the video taken by someone in the ballot processing area of the center and uploaded to Twitter, and determined that the worker did not discard a ballot.

“The answer is, no — undeniably no,” Barron said. 

The footage shows a county poll worker assigned to the absentee ballot processing who is operating one of five ballot cutting machines, Barron said, adding that the devices are used to cut envelopes in order to separate the outer envelope from the inner envelope. The paper that is being crumpled and thrown away is a list of instructions that was placed into one of the envelopes, Barron said, adding that the voters often return the “list of instructions, like the one discarded in the primary absentee ballot envelope, when submitting their ballots in the mail and or drop boxes.” 

The video, which has been shared on social media, has been viewed millions of times with a number of people falsely accusing the worker was tampering with a ballot. 

“At no time was the poll worker able to extract a ballot. I operated one of those machines,” Barron said. “The only thing you do at that station is separating the envelopes and cutting them. The ballot extraction happens at the next stage of the process, and valid extraction only occurs with the workers who are assigned to those sorting duties.”

After reviewing the footage, Barron said he contacted the worker, who told him he has left his home, is staying with friends and is “afraid to drive his car because the information about his car and his license plate is out there. 

“He is currently in hiding because he's had threats. He's had to shut down all of his social media, and … all of his personal information was released,” Barron said. “Personally, I think it's shameful.

Barron said the worker, who has not been officially identified, was among election employees who trained others how to use the cutting machines “because he was very good at it and he was the fastest one.” 

“We depended on him, and he's no longer out there right now,” Barron said. “I expressed my sorrow and that all of this has happened to him, simply for wanting to be an election worker and doing nothing but a good job during that. 

Barron added that no threats have been sent to his office, adding that there are “preliminary discussions” underway to provide the worker security.

8:32 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Pennsylvania Democrats urge state Supreme Court to allow ballots received after the election to be counted

From CNN's Ariane de Vogue

Election office workers process ballots as counting continues from the general election at the Allegheny County elections returns warehouse in Pittsburgh, Friday, Nov. 6.
Election office workers process ballots as counting continues from the general election at the Allegheny County elections returns warehouse in Pittsburgh, Friday, Nov. 6. Gene J. Puskar/AP

Lawyers for the Democratic Party of Pennsylvania told the Supreme Court late Friday that they objected to any order blocking the eventual tally of ballots received after the election. 

The legal filing came in response to Republicans in the state, who are asking the court to order the counties to take "no action" on the ballots in question, while a legal dispute plays out.

Earlier Friday, Justice Alito, acting alone, preserved the status quo by ordering the counties to follow current guidance that directs the counties to segregate the ballots – if they are counted they should not be added to current tallies. He referred the matter to the full court for its consideration.

Lawyers for Secretary of State Kathy Boockvar are expected to respond by 2 p.m. today. 

These legal filings come as the court considers whether to take up an appeal to a Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision from before the election. That decision allowed ballots received 3 days after the election, even without a valid post mark, to be counted. The justices have not yet decided whether to take up the dispute.

Critics of the President and other Republicans say he is continuing legal challenges to suggest that the courts could impact election results, even though the numbers, so far, suggest otherwise.

8:06 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

Vote-counting continues today. Here's a glossary of terms you might hear throughout the day.

Luzerne County workers canvas ballots that arrived after closing of voting until Friday at 5 p.m. and postmarked by Nov. 3rd as vote counting in the general election continues, Friday, Nov. 6, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania.
Luzerne County workers canvas ballots that arrived after closing of voting until Friday at 5 p.m. and postmarked by Nov. 3rd as vote counting in the general election continues, Friday, Nov. 6, in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. Mary Altaffer/AP

As the count continues – and narrows in key states – election officials are starting to throw around technical terms most voters don’t usually hear. 

Here’s a quick glossary:

  • Absentee ballots: Traditionally, voters who could not get to a polling place for Election Day have been allowed to request early ballots, which were usually returned by mail. Today, the term can effectively be used interchangeably with mail-in ballots. Read CNN’s fact check here
  • Adjudication: Some ballots receive extra scrutiny in a process known as ballot adjudication. Though the intricacies of the process vary state by state, it typically involves a small panel of people reviewing a ballot to determine either the voter's intent or whether the ballot can be counted at all based on whether the voter was eligible to cast it. Read more here.
  • Curing: When a signature is missing or doesn't match the one on file, or there is another issue with how the voter completed the ballot, some states require officials to contact the voter so they can correct the mistake, a process known as "curing." Read more here.
  • Late-arriving ballots: Some states accept mail-in ballots that are delivered back to officials within a set window after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by the election. Those ballots are legal to count as long as they arrive by each state’s deadline. See which states count postmarked ballots here.
  • Mail-in ballots. This is a blanket term for any ballot mailed to voters, though the completed forms can be returned by mail, to a dropbox or in person to officials or polling places. In three critical states – Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin – officials weren’t able to start processing any of these ballots until Election Day, which led to huge backlogs and slowed down the count. See when states started counting here.
  • Military ballots: In every election, a lot of votes come in late -- legally -- from Americans who are overseas or located outside their states of residence, including significant numbers of military service members and their families. Read more here.
  • Provisional ballots: Provisional ballots are cast when there's a question about a voter's eligibility, and are specially held for counting until officials are certain the vote should be accepted. Officials are required to allow anyone to cast a provisional ballot under the The Help America Vote Act of 2002,  and generally these ballots are kept separate from all other ballots while they are investigated by election officials and so are counted last. Read more here.
8:13 a.m. ET, November 7, 2020

It's just past 8 a.m. ET. Here's the state of the race in 4 key battleground states.

It's Saturday morning – four days after the election – and the race for the White House is still too close to call.

Ballots are still being counted in several key states that will determined the outcome of the presidential race.

Those states are: Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania.

Joe Biden is currently leading in all four battleground states.

Based on the states CNN has projected so far, Joe Biden currently leads President Trump by 253 to 213 electoral votes.

A win in Pennsylvania would give him enough electoral college votes to win the presidency.

Remember: Either candidate need 270 electoral votes to win the presidency.

CNN's John Berman breaks down latest numbers: