Ruth Bader Ginsburg lies in state at US Capitol

By Melissa Macaya and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 3:58 p.m. ET, September 25, 2020
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12:06 p.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Ruth Bader Ginsburg's personal trainer did push-ups in his final respects

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Pool
Pool

Bryant Johnson, Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s personal trainer, did three push-ups as he paid his final respects to the late justice inside the US Capitol.

Justice Ginsburg was consistent in her workouts and became an unlikely fitness role model. She continued her workouts at the Supreme Court gym even as gyms shut down due to the pandemic, Johnson said in April. In July, she revealed that she was undergoing chemotherapy to treat a recurrence of cancer.

Watch the moment:

11:35 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

"Wonderful memories" Joe Biden says of Justice Ginsburg as he departs ceremony

From CNN’s Kristin Wilson

Pool
Pool

“It was like when I met her when I did her hearing. I was the chairman of the committee when she was confirmed,” Democratic presidential nominee and former vice president Joe Biden said of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “Wonderful memories.”

Jill and Joe Biden attended the US Capitol ceremony to honor the legendary jurist.

11:19 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Pelosi: "Ruth Bader Ginsburg: petite in size, monumental in impact"  

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer pay their respects to the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as her casket lies in state during a memorial service in her honor in the Statuary Hall of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25.
Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer pay their respects to the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as her casket lies in state during a memorial service in her honor in the Statuary Hall of the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25. Greg Nash/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi released a statement on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lying in state at the US Capitol. Ginsburg became the first woman and Jewish person in history to do so there.

Read a portion of Pelosi's statement:

“On behalf of the United States Congress, it is my sad honor to welcome so many who loved Justice Ginsburg to this celebration of her life here in the United States Capitol.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg: petite in size, monumental in impact. Justice Ginsburg embodied justice, brilliance and goodness. Her passing is an incalculable loss for our democracy and for all who strive to build a better future for our children.
Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an icon, whose towering intellect, tenacity and devotion to our nation’s Founding ideals of equality and justice inspired millions around the world. We see that appreciation reflected in the countless letters, flowers and tributes that blanketed the front of the Supreme Court after her passing: an extraordinary outpouring of love and support from Americans from across the country."
11:14 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

CNN's Ariane de Vogue on Ginsburg's love for music and the private opera gatherings she would host 

Denyce Graves sings as U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's flag-draped casket rests on the Lincoln catafalque in Statuary Hall as she lies in state at the U.S. Capitol on September 25 in Washington, DC.
Denyce Graves sings as U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's flag-draped casket rests on the Lincoln catafalque in Statuary Hall as she lies in state at the U.S. Capitol on September 25 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

CNN's Ariane de Vogue shared an anecdote about Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's love for American operatic soprano Denyce Graves and the private opera gatherings she would host at the court for a few guests.

"You can bet that justices like Kavanaugh and Justice Gorsuch who didn't know a lot about opera, they would be there, and they would sit there and listen. And when somebody like Denyce Graves would sing, Ruth Bader Ginsburg didn't often smile on the bench or in public appearances, she was kind of very serious. She would beam. And what's interesting, she'd often say, you know, 'I always wished that I could be a great diva, but alas, I couldn't sing.' So she loved music and you really saw that in that ceremony."

Graves performed "American Anthem” in today's memorial, accompanied by pianist Laura Ward.

11:09 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Ginsburg lies in state at US Capitol as family and political leaders pay their respects 

Members of Congress and guests pay their respects to the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as her casket lies in state during a memorial service in her honor in the Statuary Hall at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25.
Members of Congress and guests pay their respects to the late Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as her casket lies in state during a memorial service in her honor in the Statuary Hall at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25. Olivier Douliery/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

The family of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, including daughter Jane and son James, paid their final respects to the late Supreme Court justice as she lay in state inside the US Capitol.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer also paid their respects in front of the casket, as did Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife Jill.

Ginsburg's casket will lie in state inside National Statuary Hall this morning. A private interment will be held next week at Arlington National Cemetery.

Watch:

11:10 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Rabbi: Justice Ginsburg brought "real change" through "dogged persistence"

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt speaks during a ceremony to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as she lies in state at Statuary Hall in the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25.
Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt speaks during a ceremony to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as she lies in state at Statuary Hall in the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25. Greg Nash/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

In her tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt spoke about the late justice's persistent work to bring "real change."

"Justice did not arrive like a lightning bolt, but rather, through dogged persistence, all the days of her life. Real change, she said, enduring change, happens one step at a time," the rabbi said.

Rabbi Holtzblatt recounted the many victories in Justice Ginsburg's life in the face of loss and challenges, including her husband's illness and her own bouts of cancer.

"Each time, she pressed forward. She returned to work, to the bench, to the court, with focus. Each and every time," she said. "Pursuing justice took resilience, persistence, a commitment to never stop."

"As a lawyer, she won equality for women and men — not in one swift victory, but brick by brick, case by case, through meticulous, careful lawyering."

Watch:

10:25 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Rabbi: "We, the people, must carry on Justice Ginsburg's legacy"

Pool
Pool

In a US Capitol ceremony to honor Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Rabbi Lauren Holtzblatt said the late justice had a "tenacious hope to preserve the integrity of the court."

"And Justice Ginsburg also loved the court, to which she so devoted her life. A court for all of us," Holtzblatt said.

The rabbi called on the country to carry on her legacy of justice.

"Today, we stand in sorrow and tomorrow we, the people, must carry on Justice Ginsburg's legacy. Even as our hearts are breaking, we must rise with her strength and move forward. She was our prophet, our north star, our strength for so very long. Now she must be permitted to rest after toiling so hard for every single one of us," Holtzblatt of the Adas Israel Congregation said.

Ginsburg became the first woman and first Jewish person in history to lie in state inside the US Capitol.

10:32 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Speaker Pelosi welcomes Justice Ginsburg to lie in state in the US Capitol

From CNN's Aditi Sangal

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a ceremony to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as she lies in state at National Statuary Hall at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaks during a ceremony to honor the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg as she lies in state at National Statuary Hall at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 25. Greg Nash/Pool/AFP/Getty Images

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi welcomed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to lie in state in the US Capitol on Friday.

"It is with profound sorrow and deep sympathy to the Ginsburg family that I have the high honor to welcome Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to lie in state in the Capitol of the United States. She does so on a catafalque built for Abraham Lincoln. May she rest in peace."

Her casket was placed on top of the Lincoln catafalque inside National Statuary Hall by the honor guard. Ginsburg is the first woman and first Jewish person in history to lie in state inside the US Capitol.

Watch Speaker Pelosi:

10:15 a.m. ET, September 25, 2020

Justice Ginsburg makes history one final time

From CNN's Janelle Davis

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's flag-draped casket is carried into Statuary Hall where she will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol on September 25 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's flag-draped casket is carried into Statuary Hall where she will lie in state at the U.S. Capitol on September 25 in Washington, DC. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is still making history, even after her death.

Ginsburg, who died last Friday due to complications of metastatic pancreas cancer, became the first woman to lie in state in the US Capitol on Friday, according to congressional historians. She's also the first Jewish person to be given that honor.

Her casket was placed on top of the Lincoln catafalque inside National Statuary Hall by the honor guard.

What this honor means: Lying in state (for government official and military officers) and lying in honor (for private citizens) is when someone's remains are placed in the US Capitol in Washington, DC, to allow the public to pay their respects.

This tribute is considered one of the highest honors.

Since the practice started in 1852, 38 people — counting Ginsburg — have been given this honor, including 12 presidents.

There are no written rules on who may lie in state or honor. It is determined by the current House and Senate and then must be accepted by the family of the deceased.

Watch her casket be placed inside the US Capitol: