Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months in prison

By Meg Wagner and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 4:03 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020
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1:38 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

Stone will also pay a $20,000 fine

From CNN's Katelyn Polantz

US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson has sentenced Roger Stone, an adviser and friend to President Trump, to three years and four months in prison for lying to Congress and threatening a witness regarding his efforts for the President's 2016 campaign.

Stone also receive two-years probation on each count, running concurrently. He must also...

  • Have substance abuse testing
  • Do community service
  • Pay a $20,000 fine

Jackson said she is transferring supervision of his release to Southern District of Florida. She will determine later whether he will have a reentry progress hearing.

12:46 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

Stone's hearing is over

Roger Stone's sentencing hearing just wrapped up after judge Amy Berman Jackson sentenced the Trump ally to three years and four months in prison.

Prosecutors initially asked for seven to nine years in prison — but Attorney General William Barr retracted that recommendation hours after Trump criticized it on Twitter for being too harsh.

Four prosecutors withdrew from the case in response to Barr's decision. Two new DC US Attorney's Office supervisors stepped up to handle Stone's sentencing, and a new sentencing memo was released asking for "far less" time. Today, one of the new prosecutors said the Justice Department stands by the original sentencing memo and argued that "the court should impose a substantial period of incarceration" on Stone.

1:33 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

JUST IN: Roger Stone sentenced to 40 months in prison

Samuel Corum/EPA/Shutterstock
Samuel Corum/EPA/Shutterstock

Judge Amy Berman Jackson has sentenced Trump ally Roger Stone to 40 months in prison. He was convicted last year on seven charges of obstruction, lying to Congress and witness tampering.

Prosecutors initially asked for seven to nine years in prison — but Attorney General William Barr retracted that recommendation hours after Trump criticized it on Twitter for being too harsh.

Four prosecutors withdrew from the case in response to Barr's decision. Two new DC US Attorney's Office supervisors stepped up to handle Stone's sentencing, and a new sentencing memo was released asking for "far less" time.

Today, one of the new prosecutors said the Justice Department stands by the original sentencing memo and argued that "the court should impose a substantial period of incarceration" on Stone.

Watch CNN:

12:21 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

Judge brings up the time Stone threatened a dog

US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson grew more intense with her speech as she shifted her focus to witness tampering. 

Jackson noted that Stone pressured witness Randy Credico not to speak about the updates Stone was sending to the campaign.

In April 2018, Stone wrote an email to Credico, saying, “You are a rat. A stoolie. You backstab your friends-run your mouth my lawyers are dying Rip you to shreds.” Stone also said he would “take that dog away from you.” 

"All of it culminated in the threats to the dog and 'prepare to die,'" Jackson said today.

She also acknowledged how Credico said Stone is a dog lover, which is "a good thing."

"Maybe today he just doesn't want to be the reason behind the tough sentence" Jackson mused about Credico.

12:24 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

Judge: "Mr. Stone is an insecure person who craves and recklessly pursues attention"

US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson called Roger Stone an "insecure person" and said nothing about his case is "funny."

"At his core, Mr. Stone is an insecure person who craves and recklessly pursues attention. Nothing about this case was a joke. It wasn’t funny," she said.

Stone's sentencing hearing is ongoing.

Watch CNN:

12:12 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

Judge outlines Stone's actions since 2016

From CNN's Katelyn Polantz

US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson is addressing Roger Stone during his sentencing hearing — and she's doing all the way back to the very beginning of Stone’s case.

In her remarks, Jackson referenced 2016 when Russia hacked the Democratic National Committee. At the time, Stone was writing to his associate Jerome Corsi, saying, "Get to Assange," referring to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

The judge highlighted Stone reaching out to Paul Manafort, saying he had an idea, to "save Trump's ass."

Stone, she said, made a statement about Assange, claiming he was in communication, and had a backchannel. At the time, Stone "was communicating with senior members of the Trump campaign," including Rick Gates and Steve Bannon, Jackson noted.

Jackson then summarized the House inquiry, including statements by Rep. Devin Nunes at the time as how it was looking at Russian influence in the election. The judge zeroed in on what Stone told the House committee on Sept. 26, 2017. Jackson said Stone claimed he only had one intermediary, letting them know it was Randy Credico. 

"It was all false," Jackson said, noting that Stone then pressured Credico not to testify.

"That was why he was indicted, not for his political activities," she said. "The notion that this case rises and falls on whether Russia interference has been proven" or whether Russia hacked the DNC computers "is also false." 

During Jackson's remarks, Stone, wearing a navy, double breasted suit with a light blue shirt and matching blue tie, stood with his three lawyers, his hands in his pockets, slightly slouching. He shifted his weight as he listened. His three lawyers barely moved.

11:50 a.m. ET, February 20, 2020

Judge: Roger Stone was not pursued in this case by "political enemies"

Judge Amy Berman Jackson said, “This case did not arise because Roger Stone was being pursued by his political enemies."

"It arose because Roger Stone characteristically injected himself smack into the middle of one of the most significant issues of the day," she said.

Stone's sentencing hearing is ongoing.

11:47 a.m. ET, February 20, 2020

The hearing is back in session

The sentencing hearing of Trump ally Roger Stone has resumed.

US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson returned to the courtroom and said, "Unsurprisingly, I have a lot to say."

Stone was convicted last year on seven charges of obstruction, lying to Congress and witness tampering. Earlier today at the hearing, prosecutors argued Stone should go to prison for "a substantial period."

1:33 p.m. ET, February 20, 2020

New prosecutor says Stone should go to prison for "a substantial period"

Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images
Alex Edelman/AFP/Getty Images

Despite the drama over whether Stone should receive the seven to nine years in prison the original Stone prosecutors recommended, the new prosecutor wants Stone to go to jail.

John Crabb Jr. said he wanted to apologize to the court for the confusion the Justice Department has caused with respect to this sentencing.

“This confusion was not caused by the original trial team,” he said. “The original trial team had authorization to submit” the original sentencing memo.

What this is all about: The prosecutors who tried the case against Stone wrote a memo asking for seven to nine years in prison — but Attorney General William Barr retracted that recommendation hours after Trump criticized it on Twitter for being too harsh. The four original prosecutors withdrew from the case in response to Barr's decision. Two new DC US Attorney's Office supervisors stepped up to handle Stone's sentencing, and a new sentencing memo was released asking for "far less" time.

Today, Crabb said he stands by the original sentencing memo, adding, “It was done in good faith.” 

The Justice Department and US Attorney’s Office operate “without fear, favor or political influence. This prosecution is righteous.”

“The court should impose a substantial period of incarceration,” Crabb added.

Crabb said he is not going to elaborate on who wrote the revised memo or say who directed him to write it, after the judge asked him directly. He would only say he signed the updated memo.

“The court will rely on its own sound judgment and experience,” Crabb said. “We have confidence the court will impose a just and fair sentence in this matter.”

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