June 24, 2022 Roe v. Wade news

By Adrienne Vogt, Aditi Sangal, Elise Hammond, Meg Wagner and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 8:19 a.m. ET, June 25, 2022
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4:43 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

Harris says SCOTUS decision is a "health care crisis"

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks on Friday, June 24.
Vice President Kamala Harris speaks on Friday, June 24. (Pool)

Vice President Kamala Harris slammed the Supreme Court ruling that overturned Roe v. Wade in remarks in Illinois on Friday. Harris was initially supposed to unveil a new administration strategy to improve maternal health, but said “this is a health care crisis.” 

“For nearly 50 years, we have talked about what Roe v. Wade protects,” Harris said in a speech. “Today … we can only talk about what Roe v. Wade protected. Past tense. This is a health care crisis.”

The vice president, the first woman elected to the office in the US, said millions of women will go to bed tonight without access to the same healthcare protections that they had just this morning. And that their mothers and grandmothers had as well.

“This is the first time in our history that a constitutional right has been taken from the people of America,” she added.

Harris said the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade today could also affect other "rights that we thought were settled" — including same-sex marriage.

"This opinion also says when you read it, that abortion is not deeply rooted in our nation's history. They offer that in the opinion as a foundation for the decision they rendered today. In holding that it is not deeply rooted in our history, today's decision on that theory, then, calls into question other rights that we thought were settled, such as the right to use birth control, the right to same-sex marriage, the right to interracial marriage," the vice president said, speaking in Illinois.

"The great aspiration of our nation has been to expand freedom. But the expansion of freedom clearly is not inevitable. It is not something that just happens — not unless we defend our most fundamental principles. Not unless we elect leaders who stand up for those principles," Harris said.

"You have the power to elect leaders who will defend and protect your rights. And as the president said earlier today, with your vote, you can act, and you have the final word. So this is not over," she said.

WATCH:

3:40 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

These states will move quickly to prohibit abortion

From CNN's Tierney Sneed

Now that the Supreme Court has given the green light for lawmakers to prohibit abortion, several states, most of them Republican-led, have taken quick steps to do so. In at least seven states, state officials say that abortion bans can now be enforced.

Three states — Kentucky, Louisiana and South Dakota — have so-called "trigger bans" that went into effect automatically with the Supreme Court's reversal Friday of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 ruling that had established a constitutional right to an abortion. Ten other states have trigger bans with implementation mechanisms that occur after a set period or after a step taken by a state government entity.

Among the trigger-ban states in the latter category, Missouri has already made the move required to implement its ban on abortion, with state Attorney General Eric Schmitt announcing Friday that he had taken the step of certification laid out by Missouri law.

Oklahoma, which had recently put in place a law banning most abortions, has also taken the step of implementing its trigger ban, according to a certification letter from the attorney general tweeted by a state Senate leader on Friday. Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge also certified the state's trigger ban, allowing it take effect on Friday, Gov. Asa Hutchinson announced.

In Texas, where the trigger ban is to be implemented on the 30th day after the Supreme Court ruling, Attorney General Ken Paxton has announced that local prosecutors may now begin enforcing an abortion ban passed by the state before the Roe ruling. Several other states have similar pre-Roe bans, but it's not clear yet whether they'll now seek to enforce them and whether such maneuvers will be challenged in court.

Other states have prohibitions on abortion that had been blocked by courts that had cited Roe's guarantee of a right to abortion. Those states may act quickly to have those court orders lifted so that those restrictions can go into effect. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey referenced a court order that had halted the state's 2019 abortion ban and said in a statement that Alabama "will immediately ask the court to strike down any legal barriers to enforcing this law."

It's likely that elsewhere in the country, state legislatures will soon be called back into session to pass strict abortion laws that previously would have run afoul of Roe.

Indiana's Republican Gov. Eric J. Holcomb is calling for a return of the General Assembly on July 6 so that legislators can consider anti-abortion legislation.

CNN's Tami Luhby and Avery Lotz contributed to this report.

3:43 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

Attorney in 1973 Roe v. Wade case says SCOTUS decision "flies in the face of American freedom"

From CNN’s Jamiel Lynch

Attorney Linda Coffee speaks during an interview on May 6.
Attorney Linda Coffee speaks during an interview on May 6. (Francois Picard/AFP/Getty Images) 

Linda Coffee, who was the lead attorney for Norma McCorvey — known in court documents as Jane Roe — in the 1973 case Roe v. Wade, said the Supreme Court's decision to overturn it “flies in the face of American freedom."

"It is a purely political response driven by a minority of Americans, and does not represent the majority of Americans. But more than this, the decision destroys dignity of all American women, and even minors. Dignity is a human experience; the US Supreme Court has destroyed human dignity with their thoughtless political decision. It is a sad day for Americans,” Coffee said.  

“In addition, the decision will set up years of litigation over the commerce clause and a woman’s inability to receive acceptable health care state-to-state. The added cost and inconvenience of a woman seeking needed health care, and facing the lack of services in her state, is a direct attack on the right to privacy, as well as equality expected when it is violation of the commerce clause of federal law and the US Constitution. The litigation will be endless, and chaos will ensure for American women, as a class of citizens.”

Linda Coffee in 1972.
Linda Coffee in 1972. (Bettmann Archive/Getty Images)

Some background: McCorvey was a Texas resident who sought to obtain an abortion. Texas law prohibited abortions except to save the pregnant mother’s life. McCorvey was pregnant when she became the lead plaintiff in the case. She gave up the baby for adoption.

McCorvey has since come forward and spoken against abortion. In 1997, McCorvey started Roe No More, an anti-abortion outreach organization that was dissolved in 2008. McCorvey died on February 18, 2017. In the 2020 documentary “AKA Jane Roe,” prior to her death in 2017, McCorvey told the film’s director that she hadn’t changed her mind about abortion but became an anti-abortion activist because she was being paid.

3:04 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

House Republicans cheer abortion ruling and vow to keep fighting

From CNN's Melanie Zanona

Dozens of House Republicans gathered for a news conference Friday to celebrate the Supreme Court decision eliminating the constitutional right to an abortion.

With women lawmakers at the front of the stage, they hailed the ruling overturning Roe v Wade as a victory for the pro-life moment and vowed to keep fighting for anti-abortion causes. 

“Today's historic Supreme Court decision is a victory for the sanctity of life. It will save countless innocent children. House Republicans are incredibly grateful for the pro-life movement’s tireless efforts for decades, leading to this day to give a voice to the voiceless and protect our most vulnerable unborn babies,” said House GOP Conference Chairwoman Elise Stefanik. “As a new mom, I know there is nothing more extraordinary than the miracle of life. Hearing Sam's heartbeat for the first time – I’m gonna cry – was the greatest blessing and gift for our family.”

“Hallelujah. I woke up this morning praying for this,” said freshman Rep. Mayra Flores, who was just sworn in this week and also delivered remarks in Spanish. “If we want to see real change in bringing crime down, we need to raise a generation to respect life in the womb.”

“This is certainly a day that pro-lifers have been waiting for for 49 years,” said Rep. Michelle Fischbach.

Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the top Republican on the House Energy and Committee, railed against a House-passed bill to codify Roe and other Democratic policies, accusing Democrats of “forcing an extreme agenda on America.”

Rep. Chris Smith, one of the leading anti-abortion voices in the GOP who is the sponsor of a 20-week nationwide abortion ban, called it a “brand new opportunity to defend the weakest and most vulnerable from the violence of abortion.”

“While this is a major step forward … we’re in an area where we've got to fight even harder to defend these innocent children,” Smith said.

House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy called for a “peaceful reaction” to the ruling and said the Department of Justice “must step up to protect our justices, their family, churches and pro-life pregnancy centers from unprovoked violence.”

When asked by CNN about what bills he would put on the floor if the GOP recaptures the majority, McCarthy did not commit to putting any specific pieces of anti-abortion legislation on the House floor.

“We will continue to look wherever we can go to save as many lives as possible,” McCarthy said. 

But after the presser, Rep. Ann Wagner told CNN that she has reassurance that one of the very first bills a GOP-led House would vote on is her “Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act”, which requires medical care to be given to an infant that survives an attempted abortion, even though medical care would already be required under such a scenario.

2:52 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

Harris will address Roe decision in upcoming remarks

From CNN's Jasmine Wright

Vice President Kamala Harris speaks on June 2, in Washington, DC.
Vice President Kamala Harris speaks on June 2, in Washington, DC. (Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images)

Vice President Kamala Harris will address the Supreme Court’s ruling to overturn Roe v. Wade in remarks Friday in Illinois, ahead of scheduled remarks on maternal health.

A White House official said Harris watched President Biden’s speech from a classroom at the CW Avery Family YMCA in Plainfield, Illinois. 

“She was joined by Senator Durbin, Congresswoman Lauren Underwood, CMS Administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, HRSA Administrator Carole Johnson, and staff,” the official added in a statement to reporters traveling.

“The Vice President did not go on a scheduled tour at the YMCA. She is conferring with staff and will address the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade while at the YMCA,” the official added.

2:39 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

Abortion rights groups condemned calls for violence ahead of SCOTUS ruling

From CNN's Whitney Wild and Donie O’Sullivan

Planned Parenthood and other abortion-rights groups condemned threats of destruction and violence Friday ahead of the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade.  

The statement came amid calls from a group known as “Jane’s Revenge” which has claimed responsibility for attacks on a number of anti-abortion rights centers across the country in recent weeks.

“Jane’s Revenge” is calling for a “Night of Rage” after the historic Supreme Court ruling is released. The calls have prompted United States Capitol Police to warn officers about the group, according to an internal memo that was issued last week and seen by CNN.

“The group’s attacks are likely to continue in the near future and increase in intensity if the decision as written stands,” the USCP memo read, adding the group is “cellular” in nature and lacks a formal leadership structure. 

“We reject the tactics and threats of groups that use destruction and violence as a means to an end,” a joint statement from Planned Parenthood, NARAL Pro-Choice America, and the Liberate Abortion Campaign read. 

“They do not speak for us, our supporters, our communities, or our movement. We are committed to protecting and expanding access to abortion and reproductive freedoms through peaceful, non-violent organizing and activism,” it added.

2:25 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

French President Macron expresses "solidarity" with US women after overturning of Roe v. Wade

From CNN’s Arnaud Siad in London

French President Emmanuel Macron pledged “solidarity” with women in the United States on Friday after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

“Abortion is a fundamental right for all women. It must be protected. I express my solidarity with the women whose freedoms are today challenged by the Supreme Court of the United States of America,” Macron said.

French Foreign Minister Catherine Colonna also said on Friday the decision was “appalling.”

She wrote on Twitter: “Appalling: the overturning by the US Supreme Court of the right to abort is a major setback for fundamental rights.”

“France will continue to defend them,” she added.

2:24 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

"Catalyst for a public health crisis": Celebrities speak out against overturning Roe v. Wade

From CNN’s Sara Smart

Celebrities are voicing their opinions after the Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade. Here's what some of them are saying on social media:

Taylor Swift

Superstar Taylor Swift, quote-tweeting former first lady Michelle Obama's statement, said on Twitter: "I’m absolutely terrified that this is where we are - that after so many decades of people fighting for women’s rights to their own bodies, today’s decision has stripped us of that."

Julianne Hough

On Instagram, dancer and actress Julianne Hough wrote that "Women’s rights are human rights. We must keep fighting," along with a clip of her from the Broadway show "POTUS."

Mark Ruffalo

Actor Mark Ruffalo on Twitter said the Supreme Court has been "turned into a political organ of the religious right."

Jamie Lee Curtis

Actress Jamie Lee Curtis posted a pink square on Instagram, writing: "As a MOTHER of two children born from other women who CHOSE to carry them to full-term which allowed me to be a mother, at this MOMENT, more than ever before, I will do EVERYTHING in my power to protect the RIGHTS of my daughters to make any CHOICE that involves THEIR bodies with THEIR own minds and without ANY governmental influence or restriction."

Padma Lakshmi

"People will still get abortions. These procedures won't stop just because Roe v. Wade is overturned. This will only prevent safe, legal abortions from taking place," model and TV host Padma Lakshmi said in a Twitter thread, calling the ruling a "catalyst for a public health crisis."

Danny DeVito

Here's how the actor succinctly summed up his feelings about the decision.

2:16 p.m. ET, June 24, 2022

What it looked like at the Supreme Court as Roe v. Wade was overturned

From CNN Photos

Friday's Supreme Court decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, meaning that there is no longer a federal constitutional right to an abortion, brought reaction from both sides of the issue.

Here's what it looked like at the Supreme Court immediately following the decision:

Anti-abortion demonstrators celebrate with champagne in front of the Supreme Court immediately following the decision to overturn Roe vs Wade.
Anti-abortion demonstrators celebrate with champagne in front of the Supreme Court immediately following the decision to overturn Roe vs Wade. (AP/Steve Helber)

A pro-abortion rights activist wears tape across their mouth reading "2nd Class Citizen" in Washington, DC, on Friday.
A pro-abortion rights activist wears tape across their mouth reading "2nd Class Citizen" in Washington, DC, on Friday. (AP/Jacquelyn Martin)

Anti-abortion campaigners celebrate outside the Supreme Court.
Anti-abortion campaigners celebrate outside the Supreme Court. (AFP/Getty Images/Olivier Douliery)

Abortion rights advocates hug outside the Supreme Court on Friday.
Abortion rights advocates hug outside the Supreme Court on Friday. (CNN/Sarah Silbiger)