Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Kentucky, Idaho and Oregon primaries

By Maureen Chowdhury, Mike Hayes, Ji Min Lee and Meg Wagner, CNN

Updated 8:47 a.m. ET, May 18, 2022
73 Posts
Sort byDropdown arrow
12:08 a.m. ET, May 18, 2022

Craig Greenberg will win the Democratic primary for mayor in Louisville, CNN projects

From CNN's Rachel Janfaza

Craig Greenberg acknowledges the crowd after winning the Democratic primary for Louisville mayor in Louisville, Kentucky on Tuesday, May 17.
Craig Greenberg acknowledges the crowd after winning the Democratic primary for Louisville mayor in Louisville, Kentucky on Tuesday, May 17. (Sam Upshaw Jr./Courier Journal/AP)

Craig Greenberg, who survived a shooting attempt at his campaign headquarters in February, will win the Democratic primary for mayor in Louisville, Kentucky, CNN projects.

Greenberg, an entrepreneur and community leader, ran on a platform that prioritized public safety, justice, affordable housing, strengthening education, jobs and making Louisville “greener.” He defeated a crowded field including community organizer Shameka Parrish-Wright, Jefferson District Court Clerk David Nicholson and pastor and community organizer Timothy Findley.

 “Thank you Louisville!” Greenberg wrote with a photo on Twitter Tuesday.

In February, Greenberg was the target of a shooting in the city's Butchertown neighborhood, Louisville Metropolitan Police Department Chief Erika Shields said at the time, adding that although there were no injuries in the incident, a round did appear to strike Greenberg's clothing.

Greenberg and his staff were gathered for a morning meeting in his office at campaign headquarters when a person walked in.

"We asked if we could help him. And he pulled out a gun, aimed it directly at me and opened fire," Greenberg told CNN's John Berman on "New Day," at the time. "I was fortunate that one of my brave teammates slammed the door shut. They were able to throw some desks on top of the door and the suspect fled. So, we are very blessed to be here today. All of us on the team are."

11:40 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

Pennsylvania's fiercest Democratic House primary goes down to the wire

From CNN's Greg Krieg

A campaign sign for Pennsylvania state Rep. Summer Lee is seen in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on May 17.
A campaign sign for Pennsylvania state Rep. Summer Lee is seen in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on May 17. (Jeff Swenson/Getty Images)

More than 110,000 votes have been counted so far in the Democratic House primary in Pennsylvania's 12th Congressional District.

The margin, as of 11:27 p.m. ET: 862 votes.

That's the size of Pennsylvania state Rep. Summer Lee's lead, with an estimated couple thousand more still to come. The night began with her leading moderate rival, Steve Irwin, jumping out ahead in the early count. But with each new wave of Election Day results, Lee, a progressive endorsed by Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, crept closer and closer.

The stakes of this open-seat race, in a safe Democratic district centered in Pittsburgh, grew as the campaign wore on and outside groups, especially as a pair of pro-Israel groups took their spending in support of Irwin to over $3 million.

In an interview with CNN days before the election, Lee said the torrent of outside spending — and similar, but so far more successful efforts tonight in North Carolina — was meant to "send a very specific message: not just that we're trying to win an election, but we're trying to destroy you, we're trying to depress voter turnout and we're trying to discourage voters."

11:43 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

CNN Projection: Kotek will win Democratic nomination for Oregon governor

Tina Kotek, right, crosses her fingers while speaking to supporters in Portland, Oregon, on Tuesday.
Tina Kotek, right, crosses her fingers while speaking to supporters in Portland, Oregon, on Tuesday. (Craig Mitchelldyer/AP)

Former Oregon House Speaker Tina Kotek will win the Democratic nomination for governor in Oregon, CNN projects.

11:31 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

In victory speech, Mastriano rejects the notion his views are "extreme"

From CNN's Melanie Zanona and Liz Turrell

Doug Mastriano speaks at his election night party in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, on May 17.
Doug Mastriano speaks at his election night party in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, on May 17. (Michale M. Santiago/Getty Images)

Doug Mastriano, the GOP nominee for Pennsylvania governor, rejected the notion that his views are extreme during his victory speech at his election night headquarters in Chambersburg after Republicans have sounded the alarm that he isn’t electable in November. 

“I repudiate that. That is crap,” Mastriano said. “That is absolutely not true. The (Democratic) party, which the media stands for and advocates for — they’ve gone extreme.”

Mastriano then proceeded to rail against Covid-19 restrictions and promised to abolish “all mandates” on day one; touched on culture war issues like critical race theory and trans athletes participating in sports; accused his Democratic opponent Josh Shapiro of having an extreme position on abortion; and made multiple references to faith and freedom throughout his speech. 

Mastriano, who was wearing a tie etched with the words “With God, all things are possible,” also weaved in a number of religious references into his speech; a Christian rock band played earlier in the night.

The Trump-backed Mastriano also has been a major proponent of 2020 election lies and has made “election integrity” a centerpiece of his campaign.

“There is a movement here that is going to shock the state this November,” Mastriano told the enthusiastic crowd.

If Republicans were hoping for a pivot to the middle now that Mastriano is their nominee, this speech was not it.

11:26 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

Lamb backs Fetterman in primary night statement: "I will do everything I can to help Democrats win"

From CNN's Brian Rokus

Democratic Rep. Conor Lamb said Tuesday that he will vote for John Fetterman in November and “do everything I can to help Democrats win.”

Lamb was particularly hard on questions around Fetterman’s electability during their debates.

“I hope that John has a speedy recovery from his stroke and from today’s surgery, and that he can return to the campaign trail soon,” he said.

11:27 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

After concession, the Cawthorn campaign headquarters is closing up

From CNN's Dianne Gallagher

Rep. Madison Cawthorn speaks to supporters and the media at his election night watch party in Hendersonville, North Carolina, on Tuesday.
Rep. Madison Cawthorn speaks to supporters and the media at his election night watch party in Hendersonville, North Carolina, on Tuesday. (Nell Redmond/AP)

With the exception of security on site, the Madison Cawthorn team is gone following news the incumbent had conceded.

A little earlier tonight, Cawthorn's spokesperson Luke Ball said the freshman representative conceded his race to opponent Chuck Edwards in a phone call. Edwards confirmed the call in remarks to supporters.

They said media at the campaign's headquarters could finish their live shots at 11 p.m. ET and then move out in the larger parking if they had additional shots. 

The stage that was set up for — but never used by Cawthorn — with flags and banners is still standing in the fenced-off lot outside his headquarters. There are no supporters left. Most of them cleared out after Cawthorn addressed them, telling them he still planned to fight and see how things would go, roughly half an hour before he conceding. 

The candidate himself left a little over an hour ago with his family.

11:30 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

GOP officials say Pennsylvania party leaders could face consequences because of strategic errors

From CNN's Melanie Zanona

A former Pennsylvania GOP official predicted that “heads could roll” at the state party organization over its decision to stay neutral in the primary race for governor, enabling hard-right candidate Doug Mastriano to clinch the nomination: “I was talking to someone involved in the state committee, and they think Chairman Lawrence Tabas is in trouble.” 

Another Pennsylvania-based GOP operative, who is closely tracking Tuesday’s primary races, added: “I think there will be a lot of sides of the party calling his strategic decisions this year into question.”

There was a last-minute, ad-hoc effort among more establishment Republicans to clear the field and coalesce around an alternative candidate, former Rep. Lou Barletta, but GOP sources said it came too late. 

11:00 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

Polls are closing in Idaho and Oregon

Voters cast their ballots at Eagle Fire Department in Eagle, Idaho, on Tuesday.
Voters cast their ballots at Eagle Fire Department in Eagle, Idaho, on Tuesday. (Kyle Green/AP)

Final polls are closing in Idaho, and in Oregon, we've hit the 11 p.m. ET deadline for ballots to be returned to drop boxes.

The most interesting race you probably haven't heard about is the Idaho Republican gubernatorial primary, where Gov. Brad Little is being challenged by Janice McGeachin, his own lieutenant governor. The race has been wild — defined primarily by the Trump-backed McGeachin's stylistic similarities to the likes of Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene. But Little is the favorite.

In Oregon, where all registered voters receive a mail-in ballot, Democratic Rep. Kurt Schrader, one of a dwindling number of moderates in the party, faces a primary challeng from progressive Jamie McLeod-Skinner. Schrader has President Biden's endorsement and the backing of House Democrats' campaign arm, but both sides expect a close race.

10:50 p.m. ET, May 17, 2022

Senior Republicans relieved Barnette is far behind Oz and McCormick

From CNN's Manu Raju

Kathy Barnette arrives at an election night event in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night.
Kathy Barnette arrives at an election night event in Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, on Tuesday night. (Ryan Collerd/Bloomberg/Getty Images)

Senior Republican senators are breathing a sigh of relief as Kathy Barnette appears to be a distant third in the race for the Pennsylvania GOP Senate nomination, according to GOP sources following the race.

Senate GOP Leader Mitch McConnell has told CNN and made clear privately he was fine with either Mehmet Oz or David McCormick. But sources told CNN that McConnell was uneasy in recent days when Barnette was rising in the polls given his long-stated concerns about nominating unelectable Republicans.

On Tuesday, McConnell declined to say if he would support Barnette if she won the nomination.

But top Republicans say they believe either Oz or McCormick can win against John Fetterman in the fall, and both are currently locked in a tight race.