Illinois, Colorado, New York and other states hold elections

By Elise Hammond, Adrienne Vogt, Aditi Sangal, Melissa Macaya and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 12:36 PM ET, Wed June 29, 2022
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4:39 p.m. ET, June 28, 2022

Some Illinois voters say "it's time for a change" in race between longtime Democrat and progressive challenger

From CNN's Eric Bradner in Oak Park, Illinois

Kina Collins, left, and Rep. Danny Davis, right.
Kina Collins, left, and Rep. Danny Davis, right. (Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune/Tribune News Service/Getty Images)

Longtime Democratic Rep. Danny Davis, 80, is defending his Chicago-area House seat against 31-year-old progressive challenger Kina Collins in today’s Illinois primary. 

In Oak Park, a liberal bastion just west of Chicago, several voters who were part of a slow trickle — about a dozen voters over 45 minutes mid-morning — into the polling place at the Nineteenth Century Charitable Association said they had backed Collins, a community organizer, because they wanted to see a generational change within the party.

Edward Solan, a 75-year-old retiree, said he voted for Collins because Davis “has been around too long, and it’s time for a change.” 

He said the reality that the House Democratic leadership — Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer and Majority Whip Jim Clyburn — are all over 80 years old was a “contributing factor” in his vote. 

“Danny Davis is older than I am. I knew when it was time to retire, and I think it’s time he does,” Solan said. “Not that I have any great disagreement with his record, but it’s time to move on.” 

Ray Gobis, a 60-year-old electrician, also said he voted for Collins, and that “part of it is age.” 

“It’s time to retire,” he said of Davis. “It’s not that I’m crazy about any other candidate. It’s just that some people maybe stick around a little too long.” 

“When you get older, you lose your energy,” Gobis said. “I think some people that are elderly may have a lot of energy. But I don’t see Danny Davis going out and being in the limelight, or bringing up subjects and being in front of the camera. We just don’t see him. I think part of it is just he’s elderly, he’s collecting a nice paycheck.” 

But some voters said they saw Davis’ years in Washington as an asset.

Carol DiMatteo, a 79-year-old retiree, said she backed Davis because of his seniority in Congress. He was first elected to the House in 1996.

“We can have the best people that have no power,” she said. 

She said she believes Davis “has the power to make things happen. And I think he has the general population in mind.”

Read more on the candidates here:

3:41 p.m. ET, June 28, 2022

What to know about Utah's primary election

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Sen. Mike Lee speaks during a hearing at the US Capitol on June 15.
Sen. Mike Lee speaks during a hearing at the US Capitol on June 15. (Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

Utah will hold primaries in its four congressional districts as well as the Republican primary for Senate where Sen. Mike Lee is favored to win renomination. Utah Democrats won’t have any federal primaries Tuesday and don’t have a Senate candidate at all, but instead endorsed independent Evan McMullin. 

Poll times: Utah is in the Mountain time zone, and polls will close at 10 p.m. ET. 

Voting eligibility: In Utah, political parties can choose which voters can participate in their primaries. The Democratic Party has opened its primaries to all voters — registered Republicans, those registered with a minor party and unaffiliated voters — to participate, while only voters registered with the Republican Party can vote in a Republican primary. 

The state's elections are primarily held by mail. All voters will receive a mail ballot and county clerks will begin mailing ballots on June 7. Ballots must be postmarked by June 27, or they can be dropped off at a drop box location before 8 p.m. local time on Election Day. Every county must have at least one in-person vote center open on Election Day. 

6:23 p.m. ET, June 28, 2022

Here's what to know about Oklahoma's primary elections

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Oklahoma will hold primary elections for both its Senate seats on Tuesday, but most of the attention will be on the Republican Senate special primary election to fill retiring Sen. Jim Inhofe’s seat. Oklahoma GOP Gov. Kevin Stitt is also facing several Republican challengers in his first reelection race. 

What to watch for in these key races:

  • Republican Senate special primary election: GOP Sen. Jim Inhofe announced earlier this year he’d be resigning his seat in January, creating a wide Republican field in the special election to replace him. Inhofe has endorsed Luke Holland, his former chief of staff. Joining Holland in the race are Rep. Markwayne Mullin and former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. Pruitt was the subject of various ethics investigations during his tenure under former President Trump, leading to his resignation in July 2018. Other candidates include Nathan Dahm and T.W. Shannon, who both have served in Oklahoma’s state legislature. With such a crowded field, it’s possible no candidate will win a majority, triggering an August runoff. The winner of the contest will face Democrat Kendra Horn in November, and the winner of the general will serve the remainder of Inhofe’s term, which ends in 2027.

Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt speaks on April 12 in Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt speaks on April 12 in Oklahoma City. (Sue Ogrocki/AP)

  • Republican, governor: Gov. Kevin Stitt is facing a handful of primary challengers in his first reelection bid. While Stitt is favored to win renomination, his challengers include Joel Kinstel, the director of the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs, who has accused Stitt of bureaucratic corruption. Far-right challenger Mark Sherwood is a minister and naturopathic doctor and has said that Stitt has not taken enough action on abortion, despite signing a near-total ban earlier this year. The winner of the Republican contest will likely face Democratic primary contender Joy Hofmeister.

Poll times: Oklahoma is in the Central Time Zone and polls will close at 8 p.m. ET. 

Voter eligibility: Oklahoma voters must show voter ID. All forms of ID must be issued by the US, the state of Oklahoma or a federally recognized tribal government and includes a voter’s name, photograph and expiration date to be considered valid. Oklahoma's Republican primary is only open to registered Republicans. The Democratic primary is open to registered Democrats and unaffiliated voters. Candidates must win a majority of the vote in order to avoid a runoff in August. 

Read more about Oklahoma's new abortion ban here.

1:08 p.m. ET, June 28, 2022

What to watch for in Nebraska's special election

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Nebraska is holding a special election to fill the seat left vacant in the 1st Congressional District by the resignation of former GOP Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, who was convicted of making false statements and lying to authorities during an investigation of illegal campaign contributions.

Republican Mike Flood, left, and Democrat Patty Pansing Brooks, right.
Republican Mike Flood, left, and Democrat Patty Pansing Brooks, right. (From Mike Flood/Patty Pansing Brooks)

How it works: For Nebraska’s special elections, the Republican and Democratic parties choose their nominees. Republican Mike Flood and Democrat Patty Pansing Brooks are representing their parties in the special election and will also be running against each in November’s general election for the full term. Unusually, this special election will be conducted under the new district lines. 

What to know about the candidates: Flood was elected to the Nebraska state legislature in 2004 and served as speaker from 2007 to 2013, making him the youngest and longest-serving speaker in the legislature’s history. After being term-limited out of office, Flood won another term in the legislature in 2020. Pansing Brooks also serves in the state legislature, having been elected in 2014. Both candidates are also their parties’ nominees for a full House term this November. Trump would’ve won this district by 11 percentage points in 2020, so Flood is favored to hold the seat for the GOP. 

Poll times: Polls close at 9 p.m. ET. Most of Nebraska uses Central time but the western part of the state is on Mountain time. However, polls open and close simultaneously across the state. 

12:58 p.m. ET, June 28, 2022

This is what you need to know about the runoff elections in Mississippi

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Republican Reps. Michael Guest and Steven Palazzo will compete in primary runoffs after failing to win a majority in the primary elections in the 3rd and 4th Congressional Districts. There will also be a runoff in the 2nd Congressional District for the Republican nomination to face Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson.

Poll times: Polls across the state will close at 8 p.m. ET.

Voter eligibility: Voters who did not vote in the initial primary are still eligible to vote in the runoff elections. However, voters who did participate in the initial elections can only participate in the runoff of the same party they voted for in the first election. 

Key races:

  • Republican, 3rd Congressional District: Rep. Michael Guest is facing a conservative challenge after voting to establish an independent commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. Guest trailed by less than 1% after the initial primary earlier this month, but former Navy pilot Michael Cassidy was unable to win 50% of the vote, forcing a runoff. The winner of the runoff will likely win the general election in November as the district is not competitive for Democrats.
  • Republican, 4th Congressional District: Rep. Steven Palazzo is attempting to survive a primary challenge in his heavily Republican southeastern district. He faces Jackson County Sheriff Mike Ezell, who received endorsements from every other candidate from the first round. An investigation from the Office of Congressional Ethics last year found “substantial” evidence that Palazzo misused campaign funds but Palazzo has denied any wrongdoing. The congressman has also been criticized for his use of proxy-voting despite formerly denouncing the practice, leading critics to dub him as “No-Show Palazzo.”
5:53 p.m. ET, June 28, 2022

What to watch for in the incumbent-vs.-incumbent races in Illinois

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Voters cast their ballots at the Latin American Motorcycle Association in Chicago on June 28.
Voters cast their ballots at the Latin American Motorcycle Association in Chicago on June 28. (Jim Vondruska/Getty Images)

Illinois will feature two incumbent House primaries — one between Republicans in the state’s 15th Congressional District, and one between Democrats in the state’s 6th Congressional District. There is also a competitive Republican primary to take on Democratic Gov. JB Pritzker.

Here's what to know about the key races:

  • Republican, 15th Congressional District: Rep. Mary Miller and Rep. Rodney Davis are both choosing to run in the new 15th Congressional District. The new district includes portions of each of the members’ current districts. Miller, a controversial first-term lawmaker voted to object to the 2020 electoral college results in Pennsylvania and Arizona and received former President Trump’s endorsement. Davis, a five-term lawmaker has the support of many local elected officials. Miller does not live in the new district but chose to challenge Davis rather than GOP Rep. Mike Bost.
  • Democrat, 6th Congressional District: Rep. Sean Casten and Rep. Marie Newman are running in this new district. Casten has served two terms in Congress after flipping his district in the Chicago suburbs in 2018. Newman is in her first term but is facing a House Ethics Committee investigation into allegations that she may have promised federal employment to a primary challenger in exchange for their political support. Newman has denied the allegations and has said the complaints were politically motivated.

Poll times: Polls across the state will close at 8 p.m. ET.

Voter eligibility: There is not a voter registration deadline in Illinois as voters can register the same day they vote. Only first-time voters who registered by mail need to show voter ID at the polls on Election Day. Illinois voters do not register with a political party. They can choose to either vote in the Democratic or Republican primaries when selecting their ballot. 

Read more about the member vs. member races in Illinois here.

10:07 a.m. ET, June 28, 2022

What you need to know about South Carolina's primary runoff election

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Catherine Fleming Bruce, left, and Krystle Matthews, right.
Catherine Fleming Bruce, left, and Krystle Matthews, right. (From Catherine Fleming Bruce/Krystle Matthews)

South Carolina will hold primary runoffs Tuesday. In the Democratic Senate race, the candidates are Catherine Fleming Bruce and Krystle Matthews.

The winner will take on incumbent Republican Sen. Tim Scott in November. Scott has served in the Senate since 2013 and previously served in the House of Representatives.

  • Poll times: Polls across the state will close at 7 p.m. ET.
  • Voter eligibility: If a South Carolinian voted in the initial primary, they can only vote in the same party’s runoff election. However, if a registered voter did not vote in the initial election, they can choose to vote in any party’s runoff election. Voters need to provide a form of ID in order to vote. That can be a South Carolina driver’s license, a South Carolina motor vehicle ID card, a South Carolina voter registration card, a federal military ID or a US passport. 
  • How votes are counted: Election officials in South Carolina can process mail ballots at 9 a.m. on Election Day. Early and mail-in ballots will likely be the first votes reported once polls close. 
9:25 a.m. ET, June 28, 2022

Here's what to know about New York's race for governor

From CNN's Ethan Cohen, Melissa Holzberg DePalo, Clara Grudberg and Nicholas Anastacio

Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks to the press on June 24 in New York.
Gov. Kathy Hochul speaks to the press on June 24 in New York. (Lev Radin/Pacific Press/LightRocket/Getty Images)

While all of New York’s statewide, federal and local primaries were supposed to take place on June 28, the state’s congressional redistricting process pushed the congressional and state Senate primaries to August. On Tuesday’s ballot, voters will vote in primaries for governor and lieutenant governor and state assembly, plus some local offices.

The most competitive statewide primaries will be for governor, where on the Democratic side, Gov. Kathy Hochul will compete for her first elected term after being elevated to the top job when former Gov. Andrew Cuomo resigned last year. On the Republican side, Rep. Lee Zeldin headlines a field that includes Andrew Giuliani, son of former NYC mayor and Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani. 

Here's what to know about the race for governor:

  • Democratic primary: Gov. Kathy Hochul is facing a progressive challenger in New York City Public Advocate Jumaane Williams, whom she beat out in the 2018 lieutenant governor election. She’s also facing a more moderate challenger in Long Island, Rep. Tom Suozzi. If Hochul wins the race for governor, she’ll be the first woman to do so in New York.
  • Republican primary: New York’s gubernatorial GOP primary field is led by Rep. Lee Zeldin, who represents the eastern end of Long Island and won the state Republican party’s endorsement. Zeldin’s competitors are Andrew Giuliani, son of former New York City mayor and former Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani; Rob Astorino, a former Westchester County executive and radio producer; and Harry Wilson, a businessman and former Treasury Department official in the Obama administration. Unlike other candidates, Astorino said Trump “bears some responsibility" for the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. The younger Giuliani was barred from attending a televised candidate debate in person by refusing to show proof of vaccination and instead participated virtually.

Poll times: New York is in the Eastern time zone, and polls will close at 9 p.m. ET. 

Voter eligibility: Only voters registered with a political party can participate in that party’s primary elections in New York. Voters do not need to provide an ID at the polls.