The latest on the Trump impeachment inquiry

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12:34 p.m. ET, October 23, 2019

House Republicans stormed the hearing room where Pentagon official was testifying

Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/AP
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/AP

As Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper was sitting down to testify, the roughly couple dozen Republicans stormed through the three different doors, a source in the room said.

Rep. Bradley Byrne yelled in committee Chair Adam Schiff's face, but Schiff didn't engage. Other Democrats, including Val Demings, screamed back at both Byrne and Rep. Louie Gohmert, who were yelling about the process.

"It was closest thing I've seen around here to mass civil unrest as a member of Congress," according to a source in the room.

Cooper left the room while the Republicans refused to leave.

The source says the Capitol Police and sergeant at arms have been consulted as members refuse to leave the room.

11:24 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

This GOP congressman was asked about diplomat's dramatic testimony. He said it "doesn't make any difference."

Asked about dramatic testimony from a top US diplomat, a GOP congressman criticized the "process" of the impeachment inquiry.

First, some background: Bill Taylor, the top US diplomat in Ukraine, testified yesterday that he had been told President Trump would withhold military aid to the country until it publicly declared investigations would be launched that could help his reelection chances.

CNN's Manu Raju today asked Rep. Mo Brooks about Taylor's lengthy opening statement. He aggressively pushed back on the testimony.

"If you were in a court of law, would you rely just on the opening statement of an attorney?" Brooks asked. "Or would you have cross examination?"

"I'm asking about the substance of what he said," Raju said.

"It doesn't make any difference. We don't know whether it's true or not because of the sham process that's being used," Brooks said.

Watch more of the exchange:

2:03 p.m. ET, October 23, 2019

Key GOP senator: The "picture coming out" of diplomat's testimony is "not a good one"

Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call/AP
Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call/AP

The second-ranking Republican leader, Sen. John Thune told reporters moments ago that “the picture coming out” of Bill Taylor’s testimony about a quid pro quo “is not a good one."

“The picture coming out of it, based on the reporting that we’ve seen, I would say is not a good one," he said. "But I would say also that until we have a process that allows for everybody to see this in full transparency, it’s pretty hard to draw an hard and fast conclusions."

What this is about: Bill Taylor, the top US diplomat in Ukraine, testified yesterday that he had been told President Trump would withhold military aid to the country until it publicly declared investigations would be launched that could help his reelection chances.

11:53 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

Giuliani associates arrive for arraignment

Lev Parnas, center, arrives for his arraignment, Wednesday, October 23 in New York.
Lev Parnas, center, arrives for his arraignment, Wednesday, October 23 in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP

Moments ago, Lev Parnas arrived for his arraignment at federal court. He and Igor Fruman – who have served as Rudy Giuliani's conduit to Ukraine — were indicted earlier this month on four counts, including conspiracy to violate the ban on foreign donations to federal and state elections, making false statements and falsifying records to the Federal Election Commission.

Igor Fruman arrived at federal court shortly before 10 a.m. ET.

Some context: Parnas and Fruman are associates of Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's personal lawyer. The two are connected to efforts to dig up dirt in Ukraine on Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

10:12 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

3 Democratic senators ask the Justice Department for documents related to Ukraine and Giuliani

Rudy Giuliani attends the US Supreme Court nomination announcement ceremony at the White House in July 2018.
Rudy Giuliani attends the US Supreme Court nomination announcement ceremony at the White House in July 2018. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Three Democratic senators have filed a Freedom of Information Act request for documents related to Ukraine and Rudy Giuliani, President Trump's lawyer.

Sens. Kamala Harris, Richard Blumenthal and Sheldon Whitehouse asked Attorney General William Barr for "documents that will shed light on any attempts by the White House to interfere with the Justice Department’s work in the interest of the president’s political goals."

“The rule of law in our country depends on having a Department of Justice that is fair, impartial, and independent,” Harris said in a statement. “But under this administration, the American people can no longer trust that their attorney general is committed to pursuing justice for every single American."

10:10 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

Trump tweets: "Where's the Whistleblower?"

As another witness heads to Capitol Hill to testify in the impeachment inquiry, President Trump tweeted, "Where's the Whistleblower?"

Some background: There is no indication that this whistleblower has disappeared.

And as we explained here, the whistleblower’s account of President Trump's phone call with Ukraine's leader has largely been proven accurate by the rough transcript released by the White House itself. All three of the whistleblower’s three primary claims were correct.

10:00 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

Defense official testifying today just arrived on Capitol Hill

J. Scott Applewhite/AP
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Laura Cooper, the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Russia, Ukraine, and Eurasia, just arrived on Capitol Hill.

She's expected to testify in front of the House Intelligence, Oversight and Foreign Affairs committees this morning.

Cooper is currently believed to be voluntarily appearing before the three House committees leading the Democratic impeachment inquiry and the Pentagon has not yet sought to block her testimony. She will be accompanied by a personal lawyer, according to defense officials.

8:41 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

You may hear the term "quid pro quo" a lot today. Here's what it means.

Bill Taylor, the top US diplomat in Ukraine, testified yesterday that he had been told President Trump would withhold military aid to the country until it publicly declared investigations would be launched that could help his reelection chances.

The deposition appears to directly refute the President's claim that there was no quid pro quo in his dealings with the former Soviet state.

But what does "quid pro quo" mean exactly? It's a Latin term meaning something for something.

The White House has denied there was any quid pro quo: Acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney last week said Trump held up an aid package to Ukraine in exchange for an investigation into an unsubstantiated theory that Ukraine, not Russia, was responsible for hacking Democratic Party emails in 2016. But hours later, Mulvaney attempted to claim that he did not admit to the quid pro quo despite clearly being asked if the Trump administration withheld funding for Ukraine for an investigation into the DNC server and answering affirmatively.

Says later, he aggressively denied that he admitted last week a quid pro quo between Trump and Ukraine, saying again that he was misunderstood and that no such agreement occurred.

Trump himself has also denied any quid pro quo. Here's what he tweeted last month:

8:17 a.m. ET, October 23, 2019

Here's who else is scheduled to be deposed this week

Impeachment investigators plan to interview several high-profile individuals in closed-door depositions — though when those depositions will happen remains in flux.

Bill Taylor, the top US diplomat in Ukraine, testified yesterday, and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper is expected to appear before the committees today.Here's who else is on the agenda:

Saturday: Philip Reeker, Acting Assistant Secretary for European and Eurasian Affairs at the State Department, is scheduled to testify. He was among the career state officials who worked to shield Marie Yovanovitch, former Ukraine ambassador, from conspiracies peddled by conservative media outlets beginning in March.

Delayed depositions: Several individuals have been previously scheduled to testify, but have had their depositions delayed. They include...

  • Michael Duffey, Office of Management and Budget associate director for National Security Programs
  • Tim Morrison, the National Security Council's senior director for Europe and Russia
  • Suriya Jayanti, a State Department official
  • Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, the Ukraine expert for the National Security Counsel