Three key witnesses testify in impeachment inquiry

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10:07 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Sondland: State Department's refusal to hand over materials is making impeachment inquiry "less than fair"

Andrew Harnik/AP
Andrew Harnik/AP

US Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland turned the State Department’s argument that the impeachment hearings process has been unfair back at them, suggesting they have made the process less fair and transparent by not allowing him to access his department phone records, emails and other documents. 

“I also must acknowledge that this process has been challenging and, in many respects, less than fair,” Sondland testified in his opening statement. “Having access to the State Department materials would have been very helpful to me in trying to reconstruct with whom I spoke and met, when, and what was said.” 

He continued: “My lawyers and I have made multiple requests to the State Department and the White House for these materials. Yet, these materials were not provided to me. They have also refused to share these materials with this Committee. These documents are not classified and, in fairness, should have been made available. In the absence of these materials, my memory has not been perfect,” Sondland said. “And I have no doubt that a more fair, open, and orderly process of allowing me to read the State Department records would have made this process more transparent.”

Some context: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has repeatedly denounced the House impeachment inquiry as unfair, specifically noting that the department has not been permitted to have its counsel in the room during closed door hearings.

“What’s been so troubling is that this inquiry has been conducted in a way that is fundamentally unfair, fundamentally unfair to the State Department,” Pompeo told KWCH-TV in Wichita in late October.

Moments ago, during his opening statement, House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff mentioned that the State Department has not yet turned over a single document.

Watch the moment:

10:03 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Sondland: "I never received a clear answer" on why security aid was withheld

Andrew Harnik/AP
Andrew Harnik/AP

Gordon Sondland, the US ambassador to the European Union, said he "never received a clear answer" on why US security aid for Ukraine was withheld.

Sondland told lawmakers he learned of the aid hold in July and August 2019, which he said he "adamantly opposed." The Ukrainians, he said, "needed those funds to fight against Russian aggression."

"I tried diligently to ask why the aid was suspended, but I never received a clear answer," Sondland said.

"In the absence of any credible explanation for the suspension of aid, I later came to believe that the resumption of security aid would not occur until there was a public statement from Ukraine committing to the investigations of the 2016 election and Burisma, as Mr. Giuliani had demanded."

He said he shared concerns about a potential quid pro quo regarding the aid with the Ukrainians and Republican Sen. Ron Johnson.

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9:51 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Sondland: Rick Perry, Kurt Volker and I "were playing the hand we were dealt"

Andrew Harnik/AP
Andrew Harnik/AP

US Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland said he — as well as Energy Secretary Rick Perry and US diplomat Kurt Volker — didn't want to work with Rudy Giuliani on Ukraine matters, but they did so because "we were playing the hand we were dealt."

If they didn't work with Giuliani, "We would lose a very important opportunity to cement relations between the United States and Ukraine," he said.

"First, Secretary Perry, Ambassador Volker and I worked with Mr. Rudy Giuliani on Ukraine matters at the express direction of the President of the United States. We did not want to work with Mr. Giuliani. Simply put, we were playing the hand we were dealt. We all understood that if we refused to work with Mr. Giuliani, we would lose a very important opportunity to cement relations between the United States and Ukraine. So we followed the President's orders."

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9:51 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Sondland on his background: "Like so many immigrants, my family was eager for freedom and hungry for opportunity"

Win McNamee/Getty Images
Win McNamee/Getty Images

In his opening statement, Gordon Sondland described his family's background as one of immigrants "eager for freedom and hungry for opportunity."

He told lawmakers that his family fled Europe during the Holocaust for Uruguay, then emigrated to Seattle, Washington, where he was born and raised.

"Like so many immigrants, my family was eager for freedom and hungry for opportunity. They raised my sister and me to be humble, hardworking, and patriotic, and I am forever grateful for the sacrifices they made on our behalf," the US ambassador to the European Union testified.

Sondland went on to say that "public service has always been important to me."

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9:42 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

GOP congressman compares Trump to George Washington

Alex Brandon/AP
Alex Brandon/AP

In his opening statement, House Intelligence Committee ranking member Devin Nunes compared President Trump to the nation's first president, George Washington.

Here's how he put it:

"I would remind my friends on the other side of the aisle that our first president, George Washington, directed his own diplomatic channels to secure a treaty with Great Britain. If my Democratic colleagues were around in 1794, they’d probably want to impeach him, too."

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10:59 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Nunes focused on same GOP talking points, despite new bombshell revelations from Sondland

Pool
Pool

Ranking Member Rep. Devin Nunes opened his remarks by welcoming EU Ambassador Gordon Sondland to testify, but he added, "Really not glad you're here."

Despite Sondland's new revelation that he pressured Ukraine to open investigations at the "express direction" of President Trump, Nunes stuck to the same GOP talking points criticizing the investigation.

Instead of talking about these dealings with Ukraine — the focus of today's hearing — Nunes' remarks focused on other areas like the Mueller investigation and alleged Russia collusion:

"As I've noted before, the Democrats on this committee spent three years accusing President Trump of being a Russian agent. In March 2018, after a year-long investigation, intelligence committee Republicans issued a 240-page report describing in detail how the Russians meddled in the 2016 elections and making specific recommendations to improve our election security," Nunes said.

He continued: "Denouncing the report as a whitewash and accusing Republicans of subverting the investigation, the Democrats issued their own report. Focusing on their now-debunked conspiracy theory that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to hack the elections."

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9:37 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Sondland was just sworn in

Pool
Pool

The US Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland was just sworn in. He'll now give his opening statement.

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9:36 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Nunes criticizes Democrats' impeachment inquiry

Pool
Pool

Rep. Devin Nunes, the ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, again blasted the Democrats' impeachment inquiry, calling it a "circus."

"As we learned last night, story time last night, we get story time first thing this morning. Ambassador [Gordon] Sondland, welcome. Glad you're here. Really not glad you're here, but welcome to the fifth day of this circus," he said.

Nunes went on to claim Democratic committee members "spent three years accusing President Trump of being a Russian agent."

These are similar talking points Nunes used yesterday in his opening statement.

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9:30 a.m. ET, November 20, 2019

Schiff: "We have not received a single document from the State Department"

House Intelligence Chair Adam Schiff called for Secretary of State Mike Pompeo to turn over documents from the State Department.

"Finally, I want to say a word about the President and Secretary Pompeo's obstruction of this investigation. We have not received a single document from the State Department, and as Ambassador Sondland's opening statement today will make clear, those documents bear directly on this investigation and this impeachment inquiry.

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