G20 summit 2019: Trump meets leaders in Osaka

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5:04 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Japan shows off its sake at the G20

From Zoe Sottile for CNN

G20 Japan/Twitter
G20 Japan/Twitter

As the first working day of the G20 summit comes to a close, the Live Kitchen at the summit venue has brought out a drink that might help guests wind down: Sake.

Sake, also called Japanese rice wine, is an alcoholic drink made by fermenting rice. Sake is the national drink of Japan and is often served with a special ceremony.

The Live Kitchen, which has been serving Japanese cuisine all day, is now serving attendees 150 types of sake in masu cups -- traditional square cups made from cypress wood that is said to enhance the sake's flavor.

Earlier Friday, sake was served at the world leaders' working lunch, as well as other dishes made with local and regional ingredients.

In 2018, Japan’s alcohol exports were valued at 61.8 billion yen (almost $574 million), according to the G20 2019 website.

5:01 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Kremlin: Amid strained bilateral relations, UK-Russia meeting "important"

From CNN’s Olga Pavlova and Nathan Hodge in Moscow

UK Prime Minister Theresa May meets Russian President Vladimir Putin during the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan.
UK Prime Minister Theresa May meets Russian President Vladimir Putin during the G20 summit in Osaka, Japan.

A meeting between Russian President Vladimir Putin and outgoing British Prime Minister Theresa May is underway on the sidelines of the G20 summit, Russian state news agency TASS reported.

Amid strained bilateral relations, the meeting between the two countries is considered very important to the Kremlin, Russian state news agency RIA-Novosti quoted Kremlin aide Yury Ushakov as saying.

Those strained relations seemed to be on display in a photo snapped of the two world leaders shaking hands.

May has said she will call on Putin to end his country's antagonistic actions, including cyberattacks and disinformation campaigns around the world, in their discussions.

"Russia can go down a different path if it desists from this sort of activity," she said in an interview with Sky News.

4:39 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Trump watched the Democratic debate between G20 meetings

From CNN's Kevin Liptak

Democratic Party presidential hopefuls debate in Miami, Florida, on Thursday night.
Democratic Party presidential hopefuls debate in Miami, Florida, on Thursday night. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Trump had a packed schedule at the G20 on Friday, including meetings with the leaders of Japan, India, Brazil, Germany and Russia.

But between talks, Trump said he'd managed to find time to catch up on the US Democratic presidential debates, the second night of which was held concurrently with Trump's meetings.

Trump said the Democrats had veered too far to the left, joking he'd heard some of the party want to change their name to the "Socialist party."

The US president has paid close attention to the debates so far, providing a running commentary for the previous day's debate.

"BORING!" Trump said on his official Twitter on Wednesday night.

4:28 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Day 1 of the summit is wrapping up. Here's a look at today's most memorable moments

From Zoe Sottile for CNN

US President Donald Trump, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi share a fist bump at their trilateral meeting.
US President Donald Trump, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi share a fist bump at their trilateral meeting. Carl Court/Getty Images

Leaders from the world's richest nations are in Osaka, Japan, for the annual two-day G20 summit. Today saw a host of bilateral and trilateral meetings, as well as the iconic class photo -- a summit tradition.

Here are the highlights of Day 1:

  • The fist bump: US President Donald Trump, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shared a fist bump at their trilateral meeting this morning, after they were asked to try and manage a three-way handshake.
  • The cheat sheet: Worried that relations with the US were deteriorating, Abe handed Trump an easy visual aid for new Japanese investments in the US It was titled: "Japan has FIVE Additional Investments in JUST ONE MONTH."
  • The Trump-Putin meeting: Trump jokingly told Russia’s Vladmir Putin in front of journalists, “Don’t meddle in the election” and wagged his finger. It was the first time the two leaders have met since the end of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.
  • The Huawei showdown: Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping sparred over Huawei, the Chinese technology giant, in veiled remarks at G20 meetings on Friday. The Trump administration has banned the use of Huawei technology in critical US infrastructure, to the disapproval of Beijing. The two men are due to meet Saturday morning.
  • The Middle East: Amid escalating tensions with Iran, Xi said the Middle East is at a “crossroads of war and peace” and called for “calm and restraint”.
4:07 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Trump needs help from other leaders in the Iran conflict — but will he get it?

Analysis from CNN's Nic Robertson

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

US President Donald Trump has a lot on his plate during this two-day summit.

He needs his fellow leaders' help in his latest showdown with Iran. After Iran shot down a US drone, Trump was ready to strike back with a retaliatory attack, only calling it off 10 minutes before it was due to launch.

But he's facing a difficult battle.

Trump has just met with Vladimir Putin of Russia, who is one of Iran's biggest backers, in an 80-minute meeting.

Earlier today, he met German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who has criticized Trump's unilateral withdrawal from the multinational nuclear deal.

Tomorrow, Trump will also meet President of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The idea he can break the Turkish strongman's steady relationship with Iran also seems like a long shot.

Meanwhile, both France and the UK have blasted Trump's collision course tactics with Iran, which have put them under pressure to help Tehran out financially in order to salvage the nuclear pact.

Indeed, Trump's biggest problem is convincing leaders he knows what he wants out of his escalation with Iran.

Read more here.

3:47 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Trump: I didn't promise Xi I'd hold off on tariffs

From CNN's Kevin Liptak and Ben Westcott

Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Donald Trump in Beijing in November 2017. They are set to discuss the US-China trade war on Sunday.
Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Donald Trump in Beijing in November 2017. They are set to discuss the US-China trade war on Sunday. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

One of the biggest moments of this year's G20 in Osaka is expected to be the meeting of US President Donald Trump and Chinese leader Xi Jinping early on Saturday morning.

Speaking to journalists on Friday, Trump said he hadn't promised Xi that he would hold off on increasing tariffs if the Chinese leader met with him in Japan.

“We’ll see what happens and what comes out of it,” Trump said. “It will be a very exciting day, I’m sure. A lot of people are talking about it.”

Whether the bilateral talks on Saturday will help resolve the raging trade war between the US and China is anyone's guess.

According to a Wall Street Journal report on Thursday, Xi is planning to present Trump with a list of preconditions before any trade deal can be agreed to.

They include contested issues such as the removal of the US ban on selling to Chinese tech giant Huawei, as well as the lifting of tariffs by the Trump administration.

CNN has not been able to independently confirm the reporting. Speaking on Thursday, Ministry of Commerce spokesman Gao Feng said China won't accept a "unilateral trade bully."

3:35 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Putin: The "liberal idea" has "outlived its purpose"

From CNN's Sarah Dean

Russia's President Vladimir Putin arrives at Kansai International Airport prior to the G20 Osaka Summit in Osaka Prefecture on June 28.
Russia's President Vladimir Putin arrives at Kansai International Airport prior to the G20 Osaka Summit in Osaka Prefecture on June 28. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

In an exclusive interview with the Financial Times Friday, Russian President Vladimir Putin signaled the end of the "liberal idea."

When asked about a backlash against the so-called establishment around the world, Putin said the "liberal idea" had "outlived its purpose."

"The obvious problem is the gap between the interest of the elites and the overwhelming majority of the people," he told the newspaper.

“Some elements of the liberal idea, such as multiculturalism, are no longer tenable."

When asked about the growing tensions between the US and Iran, Putin said tensions in the Gulf have become "more dramatic and explosive."

“The world has become more fragmented and less predictable, which is the most important and regrettable thing,” he said.

US President Donald Trump met with Putin for about 80 minutes on Friday, during which time the US leader joked with him about allegations of interference in US elections.

3:11 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Trump accepts Brazilian president's offer to visit Brazil 

From CNN's Samantha Beech

US President Donald Trump said he will visit Brazil, after Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro extended an open invitation.

Speaking to reporters ahead of their bilateral meeting, Bolsonaro said he has been a "great admirer" of Trump for a long time, even from before he was elected president. 

"It gives me great honor to be with you... I support Trump, I support the United States, I support your upcoming re-election and I do hope that you will come to Brazil and you have an open standing invitation to visit Brazil even before the upcoming elections," Bolsonaro said.

He added, "We stand together and ready to work closer and closer with you." 

In response, President Trump said he would come to Brazil and touted the country's "tremendous people." He then said the pair would be discussing "many things" including trade in their bilateral meeting. 

2:54 a.m. ET, June 28, 2019

Climate change protesters are calling on G20 leaders to stop funding coal

In the days leading up to the G20, people around the world held climate change protests, calling on world leaders to end funding for coal and fossil fuels.

“A country that has private and public banks funding coal here and across the world cannot be called a climate leader.” said Takayoshi Yokoyama of 350.org, an international environmental organization, in a statement.

According to 350.org, protests were held in Indonesia, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and the Philippines this week.

Protesters wore masks of world leaders, including papier-mache figures of Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and US President Donald Trump.

PAK YIU/AFP/Getty Images
PAK YIU/AFP/Getty Images