Democratic National Convention 2020: Day 3

By Melissa Macaya, Kyle Blaine, Jessica Estepa, Fernando Alfonso III and Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 1:20 AM ET, Thu August 20, 2020
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4:27 p.m. ET, August 19, 2020

Pelosi to slam Trump's "disrespect for facts, for working families, and for women in particular"

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is among tonight's primetime speakers, and is expected to deliver remarks following former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

Read excerpts from her speech:

  • “We come together again, not to decry the darkness, but to light a way forward for our country. That is the guiding purpose of House Democrats. We are fighting For The People.”
  • As Speaker, I’ve seen firsthand Donald Trump’s disrespect for facts, for working families, and for women in particular – disrespect written into his policies toward our health and our rights, not just his conduct. But we know what he doesn’t: that when women succeed, America succeeds.”

4:27 p.m. ET, August 19, 2020

Read excerpts from Hillary Clinton's speech tonight

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers a keynote speech during the American Federation of Teachers Shanker Institute Defense of Democracy Forum at George Washington University on September 17, 2019 in Washington, DC.
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers a keynote speech during the American Federation of Teachers Shanker Institute Defense of Democracy Forum at George Washington University on September 17, 2019 in Washington, DC. Zach Gibson/Getty Images

The Democratic National Convention has released text excerpts of remarks coming tonight from former Secretary of State and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton.

"There’s a lot of heartbreak in America right now – and the truth is, many things were broken before the pandemic," Clinton will say in a portion of her speech. "But, as the saying goes, the world breaks everyone, and afterward, many are strong at the broken places. Joe Biden knows how to heal, unify, and lead, because he’s done all of that for his family and his country.”

Read more excerpts from her speech tonight:

  • “I wish Donald Trump had been a better president. But, sadly, he is who he is. America needs a president who shows the same compassion, determination, and leadership in the White House that we see in our communities. Throughout this crisis, Americans have kept going – checking on neighbors, showing up to jobs as first responders and in hospitals, grocery stores, and nursing homes. Because it still takes a village.”
  • “For four years, people have said to me, 'I didn’t realize how dangerous he was.' 'I wish I could go back and do it over.' Or worst, 'I should have voted.' Well, this can’t be another woulda coulda shoulda election. If you vote by mail, request your ballot now, and send it back as soon as you can. If you vote in person, do it early. Bring a friend and wear a mask. Become a poll worker. Most of all, no matter what, vote. Vote like our lives and livelihoods are on the line, because they are.”
  • “100 years ago yesterday, the 19th Amendment was ratified. It took seven decades of suffragists marching, picketing, and going to jail to push us closer to a more perfect union. 55 years ago, John Lewis marched and bled in Selma because that work was unfinished.”
4:47 p.m. ET, August 19, 2020

Missed the second night of the DNC? Here's a recap of the evening's key moments

From CNN's Kate Sullivan

Former Second Lady Jill Biden and former Vice President Joe Biden stand together after remarks from Jill Biden on Tuesday, August 18, in Wilmington, Delaware.
Former Second Lady Jill Biden and former Vice President Joe Biden stand together after remarks from Jill Biden on Tuesday, August 18, in Wilmington, Delaware. Democratic National Committee

Former second lady Jill Biden closed the night with a speech from a Delaware high school classroom that connected the struggles students and parents face now with her husband's resolve in the face of personal tragedy. She never mentioned President Trump, but her speech offered a clear contrast between Trump and her husband.

Biden officially became the Democratic Party's nominee. The roll call vote on Biden's nomination was taken, and votes were cast in short videos from spots in all 57 states and territories that told stories.

The night opened with a 17-person "keynote" speech, interspersing clips of a diverse set of the party's rising stars into a coherent message.

Tuesday night's most notable Republican presence was Cindy McCain, the widow of 2008 Republican nominee John McCain. Cindy McCain did not endorse Biden explicitly, but her participation in a video that heralded the friendship between the former vice president and Arizona senator spoke volumes.

A security guard who works at The New York Times gave the first nominating speech, after going viral in a video blurting out "I love you" to Biden in an elevator.

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell, who served in Republican President George W. Bush's administration, endorsed Biden, arguing that the country needs to "restore" the values he believes America stands for and that Trump doesn't represent.

New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and activist Ady Barkan spoke about a country in moral crisis, millions of its citizens going without health care in the midst of a pandemic.

Former Secretary of State John Kerry, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and former President Bill Clinton lamented the damage done by Trump, and urged voters to turn back the clock and embrace Biden's basic decency.

4:13 p.m. ET, August 19, 2020

Barack Obama will "make a pointed case that democracy itself is on the line" in tonight's speech

From CNN's Dan Merica, Eric Bradner and Arlette Saenz

Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during the funeral service of the late Rep. John Lewis at Ebenezer Baptist Church on July 30, in Atlanta, Georgia.
Former U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during the funeral service of the late Rep. John Lewis at Ebenezer Baptist Church on July 30, in Atlanta, Georgia. Alyssa Pointer/Pool/Getty Images

President Barack Obama’s speech on Wednesday night will outline “why Joe Biden and Kamala Harris possess the experience and character to lead us out of the ongoing economic and health care disasters that the current administration has blundered into,” said Katie Hill, an Obama spokesperson.

Obama will talk about Biden’s work as his vice president, especially his work on the economy and health care, Hill said, and then turn to the importance of voting and “the cynical moves by the current administration and the Republican Party to discourage Americans from voting.”

“He’ll make a pointed case that democracy itself is on the line – along with the chance to create a better version of it,” the spokesperson said. “And finally, he’ll echo his call to all Americans who believe in a more generous, more just nation: that this election is too important to sit out and if everyone shows up, votes early, and makes sure their friends and family do the same, we can get back to work building a better, fairer America on November 3.”

4:59 p.m. ET, August 19, 2020

Harris will formally accept the vice presidential nomination tonight

From CNN's Jeff Zeleny, Dan Merica, Arlette Saenz, Maeve Reston and Eric Bradner

Presumptive Democratic vice presidential nominee, Sen. Kamala Harris signs required documents for receiving the Democratic nomination for Vice President of the United States at the Hotel DuPont on August 14 in Wilmington, Delaware.
Presumptive Democratic vice presidential nominee, Sen. Kamala Harris signs required documents for receiving the Democratic nomination for Vice President of the United States at the Hotel DuPont on August 14 in Wilmington, Delaware. Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Presumptive vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris is set to formally accept the vice presidential nomination tonight from Wilmington, Delaware.

Joe Biden named Harris as his running mate last week, making the California senator the first Black and South Asian American woman to run on a major political party's presidential ticket.

"I've decided that Kamala Harris is the best person to help me take this fight to Trump and Mike Pence and then to lead this nation starting in January 2021," Biden wrote in an email.

In selecting Harris, Biden added to the Democratic ticket a former primary rival who centered her own presidential bid on her readiness to take on Donald Trump and show Americans she would fight for them.

She rose to national prominence within the Democratic Party by interrogating Trump nominees during Senate hearings, from former Attorney General Jeff Sessions to Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Harris' selection came months after Biden committed to picking a woman to join him on the Democratic ticket. Harris, 55, is now the third woman to serve as a vice presidential candidate for a major political party, following Geraldine Ferraro as the Democratic vice presidential pick in 1984 and Sarah Palin as the Republican vice presidential pick in 2008.

Aware that his age could be a concern to some voters, Biden, 77, has said that he is "a bridge" to a new slate of Democratic leaders, and by selecting Harris, more than 20 years his junior, he has elevated a leading figure from a younger generation within the party.

Biden's selection unfolded with the utmost secrecy after a period in which he spoke with the contenders either in person or in face-to-face meetings.

He notified several close advisers on Tuesday, two people familiar with the matter told CNN. After considering some 11 women for the post, he and his aides spent time notifying the vice presidential prospects who he did not choose.