Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation vote

By Veronica Rocha, CNN

Updated 12:00 AM ET, Tue October 27, 2020
18 Posts
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9:33 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Trump tells Barrett: "The American people put their trust in you"

From CNN's Allie Malloy

President Donald Trump speaks as Amy Coney Barrett looks on, before Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, right, administers the Constitutional Oath to her on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on Monday.
President Donald Trump speaks as Amy Coney Barrett looks on, before Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, right, administers the Constitutional Oath to her on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington on Monday. Patrick Semansky/AP

President Trump spoke highly of Amy Coney Barrett during her swearing-in ceremony tonight, referring to her “sterling character."

Trump went on to say that her “impeccable credentials were unquestioned, unchallenged and obvious to all.”

“Justice Barrett made clear she will issue rulings based solely upon a faithful reading of the law and the Constitution as written not legislate from the bench,” he said. 

Trump told Barrett tonight: “As you take your oath tonight, the legacy of our ancestors falls to you."

“The American people put their trust in you and their faith in you as you take up the task of defending our laws, our Constitution and this country we all love," he said.

9:15 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

White House implements social distancing measures at Barrett's swearing-in ceremony

From CNN's Allie Malloy and Kaitlan Collins

Texas Senator Ted Cruz sits with guests ahead of the swearing-in ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett as a US Supreme Court Associate Justice on the South Lawn of the White House October 26 in Washington.
Texas Senator Ted Cruz sits with guests ahead of the swearing-in ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett as a US Supreme Court Associate Justice on the South Lawn of the White House October 26 in Washington. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

The White House has implemented social distancing measures at Amy Coney Barrett’s swearing-in ceremony at the White House this evening, one of the first times it has taken into consideration social distancing protocols.

The event is in sharp contrast to Barrett’s nomination announcement, which has been labeled by public health experts as a coronavirus superspreader event.

There are about 200 chairs out on the South Lawn this evening, which are separated a few feet from each other. Almost every attendee is also wearing a mask.

A number of senators were seen in the audience, including Sens. Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, James Lankford and Ron Johnson.

9:01 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Harris says she shares "the American people's outrage" over confirmation process

From CNN’s Jasmine Wright

Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris criticized Republicans in a tweet, saying they "denied the will of the American people by confirming" Judge Amy Coney Barrett.

Harris also issued a statement after Barrett's confirmation, saying “Senate Republicans jammed through this nomination in the middle of an election where over 60 million Americans have already voted."

“The American people see this confirmation for what it is: an illegitimate move that will set our country back for generations," the California senator also said in the statement. "Access to health care is now in jeopardy. Our voting rights are now in jeopardy. Workers’ rights are now in jeopardy. LGBTQ equality is now in jeopardy. The right to a safe and legal abortion is now in jeopardy. The ability to address a changing climate is now in jeopardy. And so much more."

“I share the American people’s outrage at this rushed process to confirm a nominee who has the potential to do great harm," she added.

8:48 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Trump hasn't made SCOTUS a major campaign point

From CNN's Kevin Liptak

President Donald Trump delivers remarks at a rally during the last full week of campaigning before the presidential election on October 26, in Allentown, Pennsylvania.
President Donald Trump delivers remarks at a rally during the last full week of campaigning before the presidential election on October 26, in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Even as President Trump seeks to use Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation to the Supreme Court as a political win, the issue hasn't been as prominent during his rallies as some of his advisers had hoped.

On Monday, it took Trump 51 minutes to mention Barrett during his rally in Allentown, Pennsylvania. It was a similar story in Lititz, where Trump didn't mention his third Supreme Court nomination until 54 minutes into his speech.

Trump raised the issue earlier on in his speech in Martinsburg. But generally the Supreme Court nomination has taken a backseat in his campaign speech and his political messaging.

Trump raised the nomination more often when it was in the news, including in September when crowds chanted "fill that seat" at Trump's rallies. 

But since then it's been replaced by issues like Trump's gripes with the media, his attacks on Joe Biden and the litany of grievances against his opponents.

Some of the President's political allies wish he would use the nomination more to galvanize supporters. They see the issue as overwhelmingly positive for Trump and question why it's not being used more on the campaign trail.

When she was nominated, some even suggested Barrett would act in appearances as another running mate for the President.

But on the campaign trail, Trump has made his rallies mostly about himself — leaving little room in the spotlight for anyone else. 

8:23 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Chief Justice Roberts will administer the judicial oath tomorrow

People visit the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, October 21.
People visit the U.S. Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday, October 21. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Chief Justice John Roberts will administer the judicial oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett tomorrow at the US Supreme Court.

The private ceremony will take place in the East Conference Room, according to a news release from the Supreme Court.

"Upon administration of that oath, she will be able to begin to participate in the work of the Court," the release said.

A more formal investiture ceremony will take place at a later date.

8:35 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Senate confirms Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court

From CNN's Clare Foran and Ted Barrett

Senate TV
Senate TV

The Senate has voted to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court, solidifying the court's conservative majority.

The vote was 52-48.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who is in a tough re-election fight, was the only GOP senator to cross party lines and vote with Democrats against the nomination after having expressed concerns that it's too close to Election Day to consider a nominee.

The stakes in the Supreme Court battle are immense and come at a pivotal time in American politics in the run up to an election where control of Congress and the White House are on the line. Trump's appointment of a new Supreme Court justice will mark the third of his tenure in office, giving Republicans a historic opportunity to deliver on the key conservative priority and campaign promise of transforming the federal courts through lifetime appointments.

Barrett, who is 48 years old, is likely to serve on the court for decades and will give conservatives a 6-3 majority on the Supreme Court, a shift in its makeup that could have dramatic implications for a range of issues that could come before it, including the future of the Affordable Care Act and any potential disputes regarding the 2020 election.

The confirmation vote comes after Senate Republicans, who hold a majority in the upper chamber, pushed ahead with one of the quickest nomination proceedings in modern times following the death of the late Justice and liberal icon Ruth Bader Ginsburg last month.

Watch here:

7:57 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Senate votes on Barrett's confirmation

From CNN's Clare Foran and Ted Barrett

The Senate is now taking the final vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Republicans need only a simple majority vote to elevate President Trump’s nominee to the high court and they are on track to do so.

Republican Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, who is in a tough re-election fight, is expected to be the only GOP senator to vote against the nomination over concerns that it's too close to Election Day to consider a nominee.

All Senate Democrats are expected to oppose the nomination.

 

7:59 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

McConnell delivers final remarks ahead of Barrett confirmation vote

From CNN's Lauren Fox 

Senate TV
Senate TV

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is delivering his final remarks on the Senate floor right now on Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination.

But in what is unusual for the majority leader, he is delivering his speech largely to his GOP conference. He is turning to them and gesturing to them frequently. And like they did yesterday for the procedural vote, most of the GOP members are in their seats.

Democrats meanwhile are not sitting on the chamber. At one point, McConnell turned to the Democratic side of the aisle and noted they did not appear to be on the floor at the moment.

“By any objective standard, Judge Barrett deserves to be confirmed to the Supreme Court. The American people agree. In just a few minutes, she’ll be on the Supreme Court,” he said.

McConnell’s speech, which is part lecture on the judicial history of the modern Senate and part pep talk for his conference, comes as we expect just one GOP defection: Sen. Susan Collins.

8:32 p.m. ET, October 26, 2020

Schumer slams GOP push to confirm Barrett

From CNN's Clare Foran

Senate TV
Senate TV

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer slammed the GOP push to swiftly confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett this evening in a floor speech ahead of the final confirmation vote.

Schumer accused Republicans of stealing the vacant Supreme Court seat, while making an apparent reference to Republicans blocking Merrick Garland, saying, “Tonight the Republican majority will make a mockery of its own stated principle that the American people deserve a voice in the selection of Supreme Court justices, completing the partisan theft of two seats on the Supreme Court, using completely contradictory rationales.” 

“After refusing a Democratic nominee to the Supreme Court because an election was eight months away, they will confirm a Republican nominee before an election that is eight days away,” Schumer said, adding, “The Republican majority is lighting its credibility on fire. This hypocritical, 180 degree turn is spectacularly obvious to the American people.”

“The American people will suffer the consequences of Judge Barrett’s far-right, out of the mainstream views for generations,” Schumer warned

Watch here: