Opinion

Parkland students, ignore the idiots

By Jeff Pearlman
They can call you 'actors' and tie you to 'liberal causes'--but they don't know what they're talking about: after a tragedy, you and your peers have made the bold decision to fight for change, writes Jeff Pearlman. Keep going.
NEW YORK - JUNE 24:  Billy Graham speaks during his Crusade at Flushing Meadows Corona Park June 24, 2005 in the Queens borough of New York. Flushing Meadows Corona Park is the site for Graham's sermons on June 24-26, which looks to draw thousands of people from across the country, and will purportedly be the aging Christian televangelist's final crusade.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The gap that Billy Graham leaves behind

By Timothy Stanley
Graham's life is a rebuke to the idea that evangelicalism and politics don't or shouldn't mix, writes Tim Stanley. He became almost part of the unwritten constitution of American politics: a counselor to presidents, Democrat and Republican, and for many Protestants a moral anchor in a fast-changing century.
USA. New York City. 1957.  American evangelist Billy GRAHAM delivers a sermon at Madison Square Garden.

What Billy Graham would want you to know about him

By Ed Stetzer
Billy Graham left a mark, evident in the remembrances offered by so many around the world. From political and religious leaders to everyday people on the street, few in recent memory have provoked such an outpouring. Each comment is a reminder not only of Graham's role in transforming individual Christians through his revivals, but that he stands as a giant in modern history.

Parkland students, ignore the idiots

By Jeff Pearlman
They can call you 'actors' and tie you to 'liberal causes'--but they don't know what they're talking about: after a tragedy, you and your peers have made the bold decision to fight for change, writes Jeff Pearlman. Keep going.
Amanda Meyer has destroyed her handgun, a 0.40 Sig Sauer P229 following the Florida school shooting

Gun owners are talking about gun control. Stop and listen

By Carol Costello, Anchor
Pump the brakes, progressives, and listen. Thanks to those activist kids from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, the national conversation surrounding guns is evolving -- and it's evolving in a serious way. Some gun owners are already taking action.
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 11:  Soldiers, veterans and civilians carry an American Flag as they march in the Veterans Day Parade on November 11, 2017 in New York City. The largest Veterans Day event in the nation, this year's parade features thousands of marchers, including military units, civic and youth groups, businesses and high school bands from across the country and veterans of all eras. The U.S. Air Force is this year's featured service and the grand marshal is space pioneer Buzz Aldrin.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

The military is like the rest of America -- divided on guns

By Mark Hertling
The divisive dialogue regarding what to do about guns in America has also embroiled those serving in our military. This week, I was asked if I would share my thoughts about a soldier's relationship with his or her weapon and how military men and women feel about the gun debate. While honored to provide some insight, I need to place a few caveats on what I share as a former soldier.

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    I was lying on the cold metal table in the operating room in the midst of giving birth to my second child, in what had been a totally normal and uneventful pregnancy, when the anesthesiologist assigned to my C-section suggested that my obstetrician might want to tie my tubes. He didn't ask me. He didn't even acknowledge that I was there, though I was in a ragged state of consciousness. He said, "While you're down there, we are going to go ahead and tie her tubes, right?"

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