Turkey launches military offensive in Syria

4:40 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

Syrian Democratic Forces repel Turkish ground forces on border, spokesperson says

Syrian Democratic Forces fighters have repelled Turkish ground forces along the border, according to SDF spokesperson Mustafa Bali.

“Ground attack by Turkish forces has been repelled by SDF fighters in Til Abyad. No advance as of now," he tweeted.

Bali's announcement comes after the Turkish Defense Ministry confirmed earlier on Twitter that the Turkish Armed Forces and the Syrian National Army had "launched the land operation into the east of the Euphrates river as part of the Operation Peace Spring.”

4:19 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

France condemns Turkey's military offensive in Syria

MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images
MOHAMED EL-SHAHED/AFP/Getty Images

France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian condemned Turkey’s military offensive in northeast Syria and said they have called on the United Nations Security Council.

“I condemn the unilateral operation launched by Turkey in Syria,” Le Drian tweeted today. 

“It jeopardizes the security and humanitarian efforts of the Coalition against ISIS and risks undermining the security of Europeans. It must stop. The Security Council has been called upon,” he added. 

4:21 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

Turkish Armed Forces confirm launch of land operation

The Turkish Defense Ministry confirmed the launch of its land operation in northeast Syria today.

“The Turkish Armed Forces and the Syrian National Army have launched the land operation into the east of the Euphrates river as part of the Operation Peace Spring," the ministry said in a tweet.

Some context: Turkey is reportedly targeting the US-backed Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) — a key US ally in the war against ISIS. Just hours after Turkey launched its offensive, the SDF said that they had suspended their anti-ISIS operations in order to deal with the attack, a senior US defense official told CNN.

4:19 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

Trump and UK's Boris Johnson discussed Syria today

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson spoke to President Trump today about Turkey's military operation in Syria.

“The leaders expressed their serious concern at Turkey’s invasion of north east Syria and the risk of a humanitarian catastrophe in the region,” the Downing Street statement said.

Some background: Days ago Trump announced that US troops would pull back from the area, prompting much criticism and fear over violence in the region.

Turkey's military launched an offensive in northeast Syria today to push US-backed Kurdish forces away from its border.

3:24 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

Iraq’s Kurdistan Regional Government says it can't absorb displacement from Turkish offensive

Syrians flee shelling by Turkish forces in Ras al-Ayn, northeast Syria.
Syrians flee shelling by Turkish forces in Ras al-Ayn, northeast Syria.

The Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG), which administers a semi-autonomous region in northern Iraq, said it does not have the capacity to accommodate all of the people who are expected to be displaced as a result of the Turkish offensive.

"We do not have the capacity to absorb this,” KRG spokesperson Jutyar Adil told CNN, urging the international community to intervene with support. 

The KRG said Wednesday that the consequences of the military escalation "go beyond Syria's borders," warning of the return of ISIS and mass displacement.

"The regional government has always been stressing about the crisis and must be resolved through a strict political solution that guarantees the rights of all Syrians, including the Kurdish people," the statement said.

 

4:20 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

Counter ISIS operations have "effectively stopped," senior US official says

The Turkish offensive has already had a "detrimental effect" on US-led counter ISIS operations, a senior US defense official told CNN.

"They have effectively stopped," the source said of the US campaign against the militant group. 

According to the source, Turkey is targeting the US-backed Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) — a key US ally in the war against ISIS. Just hours after Turkey launched its offensive, the SDF said that they had suspended their anti-ISIS operations in order to deal with the attack.

The Turkish operation "has challenged our ability to build local security forces, conduct stabilization operations and the Syrian Democratic Forces [ability] to guard over 11,000 dangerous ISIS fighters. We are just watching the second largest army in NATO attack one of our best counter-terrorism partners,” the source said.

2:28 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

Turkey won't shoulder burden of ISIS fighters alone, Erdogan adviser says

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's senior adviser Gülnur Aybet speaks with CNN's Christiane Amanpour.
President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's senior adviser Gülnur Aybet speaks with CNN's Christiane Amanpour.

The responsibility for ISIS fighters being held in northeastern Syria cannot fall to Turkey alone, a senior adviser to Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told CNN's Christiane Amanpour.

"In terms of the ISIS fighters … held in prisons, which are closer to our border, of course initially our priority is to provide security and stability in the areas we move into," Erdogan's senior adviser Gülnur Aybet said. "We will safeguard any areas that contain these prisons. However, we would like the management of the camps, in particular, something that has to be undertaken as a joint effort with the international community."

We never said we would shoulder this burden all by ourselves," Aybet added.

Her comments were a stark contrast to a statement released by the White House Wednesday, in which US President Donald Trump said that Turkey was "now responsible for ensuring all ISIS fighters being held captive remain in prison and that ISIS does not reconstitute in any way, shape, or form." 

"We expect Turkey to abide by all of its commitments, and we continue to monitor the situation closely," Trump said.

Aybet suggested that, when Erdogan visits the White House next month, the two leaders will discuss further details about dealing with the ISIS fighters.

2:08 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

UN Security Council will hold a closed-door meeting about Syria on Thursday

The United Nations Security Council will meet privately Thursday morning to discuss the situation in Syria, two UN diplomats tell CNN. 

The announcement comes as Turkey begins its military offensive in northern Syria to move US-backed Kurdish forces away from its border.

Five European countries -- including France, Germany, and the United Kingdom – requested the meeting, according to one of the diplomats.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres is "very concerned" by developments in northern Syria and called for civilians to be protected "in accordance with international law," Guterres' deputy spokesman, Farhan Haq, told reporters Wednesday.

"As the Security Council reaffirmed yesterday in its presidential statement, any solution must respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Syria,” Haq added.

 

1:58 p.m. ET, October 9, 2019

NATO secretary urges Turkey to act with restraint

NATO's Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg has called for Turkey -- a member of the alliance -- to "act with restraint."

Speaking at a press briefing in Rome Wednesday, Stoltenberg said that Turkey has "legitimate security concerns," has suffered "horrendous terrorist attacks," and plays host to "millions of Syrian refugees." But Stoltenberg added that he counted on Turkey "to act with restraint and to ensure that any action it may take in Northern Syria is proportionate and measured."