Redistricting in New Jersey

Here’s how new congressional maps shift voting power in every state

Every 10 years, states redraw the boundaries of their congressional districts to reflect new population counts from the census. New Jersey’s congressional map was drawn by the state’s redistricting commission, though Republicans and Democrats on the commission proposed their own versions. The commission’s tiebreaker, former New Jersey Supreme Court Justice John Wallace, chose the Democrats’ map.

Republicans appealed his decision to the state’s Supreme Court, because Wallace said his choice came down to having had a Republican-drawn map in effect for the last 10 years. The court ended up dismissing the case.

The new map gives most of the state’s Democratic incumbents safe seats, but makes Democratic Rep. Tom Malinowski’s 7th District more competitive for Republicans.

How the districts voted in 2020, by presidential vote margin in percentage points

Democratic

30+
15+
5+

Competitive

Within 5

Republican

5+
15+
30+

Old map 12 districts

In the old congressional map, there are 9 Democratic, 2 competitive and 1 Republican districts.

Change

Change in Democratic districts: 0

Change in Competitive districts: 0

Change in Republican districts: 0

New map 12 districts

In the new congressional map, there are 9 Democratic, 2 competitive and 1 Republican districts.

How the new map shifts voting power by demographic

New Jersey will continue to have 12 seats in the House. In seven of those districts, White voters represent the majority. Hispanic voters continue to represent the majority in New Jersey’s 8th District, which includes parts of Newark and Jersey City. There will continue to be four districts where no demographic group represents the majority.

Number of White-majority districts
Old Map
7
New Map
7
A chart showing the number of White-majority districts has remained the same with 7.
Hispanic-majority districts
1
1
A chart showing the number of Hispanic-majority districts has remained the same with 1.
No group has majority
4
4
A chart showing the number of districts where no group has a majority has remained the same with 4.

The group that represents the majority in each district

White
Hispanic
No group has majority

About the data

Sources: US Census Bureau, Edison Research, each state’s legislature or other redistricting authority

Methodology note: Block-level demographic data from the 2020 census is reaggregated into each new district’s boundaries.