Facebook's bottomless pit of scandals

The year to fix Facebook – January 4

The year to fix Facebook

January 4
The year to fix Facebook
Chesnot/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg makes a lofty promise for 2018: Fix Facebook. The CEO says in a note that Facebook has work to do, “including protecting our community from abuse and hate, defending against interference by nation states, or making sure that time spent on Facebook is time well spent.” Turns out, saying that was easier than doing it.

New News Feed – January 11

New News Feed

January 11

Facebook announces it’s changing how News Feed is organized. It will prioritize posts from friends and family over posts from publishers and brands, even if it means the time people spend on Facebook goes down.

Investors react – January 31

Investors react

January 31

Facebook’s stock is rattled by news that people are spending less time on the service. The stock will fluctuate wildly over the next few months until settling into a steady decline.

A bombshell investigation – March 17

A bombshell investigation

March 17

The New York Times and the Guardian report that a once-unknown data analysis firm called Cambridge Analytica tried to influence how Americans voted using information gleaned from millions of Facebook profiles.

“Delete Facebook” – March 20

“Delete Facebook”

March 20

WhatsApp cofounder Brian Acton urges Facebook users to delete their accounts. His words are notable because WhatsApp is owned by Facebook. He joins a growing “delete Facebook” movement over data privacy and the spread of misinformation on the platform.

Zuckerberg’s apology – March 21

Zuckerberg’s apology

March 21

"I'm really sorry that this happened," Zuckerberg tells CNN Business’ Laurie Segall about the Cambridge Analytica scandal in an exclusive interview.

A visit to Congress – March 27

A visit to Congress

March 27

CNN Business reports that Mark Zuckerberg will go before Congress to testify about data privacy practices. The same day, he also turns down a request from British lawmakers to answer questions on the social network's privacy practices and Facebook says it will send two deputies instead.

Privacy changes – March 28

Privacy changes

March 28
Privacy changes
Noah Berger/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook rolls out changes to give users around the world more control over their privacy settings. The changes complied with a new data protection measure in the European Union.

A scandal worsens – April 4

A scandal worsens

April 4

Facebook reveals that Cambridge Analytica had information on 87 million Facebook users without their knowledge – nearly 40 million more than what was previously reported. The same day, Zuckerberg admits that Facebook will never be able to fully protect its platform from abuse by bad actors.

Zuckerberg testifies – April 10 - 11

Zuckerberg testifies

April 10 - 11

Zuckerberg heads to Washington, DC and endures 10 hours of questions from almost 100 lawmakers about the company’s practices.

Facebook still makes gains – April 25

Facebook still makes gains

April 25

Despite backlash from the Cambridge Analytica scandal, Facebook reports that it reversed its first-ever decline in daily active users in the United States and Canada during the first three months of 2018.

WhatsApp co-founder quits – April 30

WhatsApp co-founder quits

April 30

Facebook-owned WhatsApp CEO and cofounder Jan Koum says he's leaving the messaging app.

More data-sharing deals – June 3

More data-sharing deals

June 3

Another New York Times investigation reveals the scope of data-sharing deals Facebook has with numerous tech companies, including Apple, Microsoft and Samsung.

Problems in India – July 3-4

Problems in India

July 3-4

WhatsApp grapples with issues in India after hoax messages sent on the Facebook-owned app are blamed for a spate of lynchings across the country.

The UK pushes back – July 10

The UK pushes back

July 10

UK regulators say Facebook broke the law by failing to safeguard user data, and by not telling tens of millions of people how Cambridge Analytica harvested their information for use in political campaigns. The company is eventually fined £500,000 — the largest amount allowed under Britain's data protection law.

The worst stock day in history – July 26

The worst stock day in history

July 26
The worst stock day in history

Facebook stock has the worst day for a public company in history — it plunged 19% — after the company says revenue growth will slow as it "puts privacy first" and rethinks its product experiences. The selloff caused about $119 billion in market value to vanish.

Bans in Myanmar – August 27

Bans in Myanmar

August 27

Facebook says it has banned 20 organizations and individuals in Myanmar, including a senior military commander, from using its service. The company acknowledges that it was "too slow" to prevent the spread of "hate and misinformation" in the country.

Sheryl Sandberg testifies – September 5

Sheryl Sandberg testifies

September 5
Sheryl Sandberg testifies
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg tells a US Senate committee that the company's "understanding of overall Russian activity in 2016 is limited because we do not have access to the information or investigative tools that the US government and this committee have."

Instagram departures – September 24

Instagram departures

September 24

Instagram cofounders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger announce they are leaving the photo-sharing app owned by Facebook.

New Facebook hack – September 28

New Facebook hack

September 28

Facebook says an attack exposed information on nearly 50 million users and gave the attackers access to those users' accounts on other sites and apps where they logged in using Facebook. It would later revise this number and say that 30 million people were affected.

More stock declines – October 30

More stock declines

October 30

Facebook disappoints investors again with its latest earnings report. The company’s stock continues to decline.

A damning investigation – November 14

A damning investigation

November 14

Another major New York Times investigation suggests the company had not been forthcoming enough about Russian interference on its platform. The newspaper also reports Facebook hired a firm that scrutinized its critics, including the billionaire George Soros.

New internal documents – December 5

New internal documents

December 5
CNN Business

The British Parliament releases a set of internal Facebook documents the company had fought for months to stop from being made public. The documents involve claims about the company’s alleged disregard for user privacy, as well as a claim that Zuckerberg wanted to force Facebook’s rivals out of business.

Shared data scandal widens – December 18

Shared data scandal widens

December 18

A new report in The New York Times reveals that Facebook offered more of its users' data to companies — including Microsoft, Netflix, Spotify and Amazon — than previously revealed. Netflix and Spotify were reportedly given the ability to read Facebook users’ private messages.