November 15, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Tara Subramaniam, Aditi Sangal, Adrienne Vogt, Mike Hayes, Jack Guy and Maureen Chowdhury, CNN

Updated 7:07 a.m. ET, November 16, 2022
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11:52 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

85 missiles have been fired at Ukraine so far Tuesday, Zelensky says

From CNN's Tim Lister

Smoke following a missile attack rises over Lviv, Ukraine, on November 15.
Smoke following a missile attack rises over Lviv, Ukraine, on November 15. (Pavlo Palamarchuk/Reuters)

In a brief video message Tuesday, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said "85 missiles strikes have been launched on Ukrainian cities, mostly on energy infrastructure."

"We can see what the enemy wants, they will not succeed. We may yet have 20 more strikes, please look after yourselves, stay in shelter for some time," he said. "I know that the strikes have caused power outages in many cities of our country. We are working to restore them. We will withstand."

On Oct. 10, the Ukrainian military reported 84 missile strikes — the highest number in a single day until Tuesday. Those strikes disrupted electricity supply to about one-third of consumers across Ukraine.

11:16 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

Ukrainian internet connectivity down by 1/3 amid Russian missile strikes, cybersecurity firm says

From CNN's Tim Lister

Netblocks, which tracks cybersecurity and connectivity around the world, says that Ukraine "is currently experiencing a major internet disruption."

Netblocks tweeted that "live metrics show national connectivity at 67% of previous levels; the incident comes amid reports of one of the most intense Russian missile attacks to date."

Power supplies have been disrupted in several Ukrainian regions by Tuesday's missile strikes.

11:32 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

About 100 missiles fired at cities across Ukraine, air force says

From CNN's Tim Lister, Julia Kesaieva and Denis Lapin

Russia fired "around 100 missiles" at cities across Ukraine on Tuesday, according to Yurii Ihnat, spokesperson for the Ukrainian Air Force command.

At least a dozen cities and districts were targeted, according to a CNN analysis of the missile strikes. The wave of strikes appears to be the largest since Oct. 10, when Russia stepped up its campaign to destroy electricity, water and gas infrastructure across Ukraine. 

Herman Halushchenko, Ukrainian Energy Minister, confirmed that most of the targets Tuesday were energy facilities.

"This attack may have an impact not only on the energy system of Ukraine, but also on the energy systems of some of our neighbors," he said on Facebook.

"The hits are occurring throughout the Ukrainian power system: both at generation facilities and at the power transmission system," Halushchenko said.
"After defeats in the military and international arenas, the enemy makes another attempt of terrorist revenge and tries to inflict maximum damage to our energy system on the eve of winter."

State power supplier Ukrenergo said the Russians were "trying to turn off the lights in the country again. The attack is still ongoing, we cannot yet estimate the full extent of the damage, there are strikes on our infrastructure in all regions of the country, but the most difficult situation is in the northern and central regions."

Rescue workers at the scene of a missile strike in the Pecherskyi district on November 15, in Kyiv, Ukraine.
Rescue workers at the scene of a missile strike in the Pecherskyi district on November 15, in Kyiv, Ukraine. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Ukrenergo confirmed that in the city of Kyiv, special emergency shutdown schedules had been introduced.

The Kyiv city military administration reports that one person was killed in a missile strike that had "hit a residential building in Pecherskyi residential district."

Kyiv's mayor Vitali Klitschko confirmed that "in one of the hit buildings, rescuers found one body."

Rescue and search operations continue, he said.

10:47 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

At least half of customers have no electricity in Kyiv after Russian strikes force emergency outages

From Julia Kesaieva, Tim Lister and Denis Lapin 

Local residents gather near their residential building hit by a Russian missile strike in Kyiv, Ukraine, on November 15.
Local residents gather near their residential building hit by a Russian missile strike in Kyiv, Ukraine, on November 15. (Gleb Garanich/Reuters)

Multiple Russian cruise missiles targeted power infrastructure in several Ukrainian regions Tuesday, leaving the supply of electricity in a critical condition, according to senior Ukrainian officials. 

Kyrylo Tymoshenko, deputy head of the Office of the President of Ukraine, said on Telegram that "Russian terrorists have conducted another planned attack on energy infrastructure facilities. The situation is critical."

"Most hits were recorded in the center and north of the country. The situation in the capital is extremely difficult, special emergency shutdown schedules are being introduced," he added.

DTEK — a power supplier in the Kyiv region — said that "due to the missile attacks from the Russian Federation, by the order of NPC Ukrenergo [the state power company], we are forced to start emergency power outages. This is a necessary step to balance the power system and avoid equipment failures."

"Please continue to consume electricity moderately!" DTEK said.

Kyiv Mayor Vitalii Klitschko also said that power engineers are beginning emergency power outages in the capital.

He said that at least half of consumers have no electricity.

Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal said on Twitter that "Russian terrorists have once again shown their so-called willingness to negotiate today. Another massive missile attack during #G20Summit. Residential buildings were hit. They are trying to destroy energy infrastructure."

Two missile hits have been reported by the Khmelnytskyi regional military administration in western Ukraine, where local authorities said there was no electricity supply in part of the region.

Earlier power interruptions were also reported in the northeastern city of Kharkiv.

In central Ukraine, Serhiy Borzov, governor of the Vinnytsia region, said there had been "a hit to the critical infrastructure facility."

10:07 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

Ukraine's foreign minister says missile attacks are Russia's answer on peace talks

From CNN's Tim Lister

Firefighters work to put out a fire in a residential building hit by a Russian missile strike in Kyiv, Ukraine, on November 15.
Firefighters work to put out a fire in a residential building hit by a Russian missile strike in Kyiv, Ukraine, on November 15. (Gleb Garanich/Reuters)

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said that Tuesday's Russian attacks across shows what Russia thinks about any possible peace negotiations.

"Russian missiles are killing people and ruining infrastructure across Ukraine right now," Kuleba said on Twitter.

Amid reports of Russian missile strikes in multiple locations across Ukraine, Kuleba added: "This is what Russia has to say on the issue of peace talks. Stop proposing Ukraine to accept Russian ultimatums! This terror can only be stopped with the strength of our weapons & principles."

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelesnky earlier Tuesday outlined a 10-point peace plan to end Russia's invasion of Ukraine in a video speech to G20 leaders in Bali, Indonesia.

10:03 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

Russian missiles strike at least seven Ukrainian cities

From CNN's Julia Kesaieva and Denis Lapin

Amid a barrage of Russian missile attacks against Ukraine Tuesday, at least seven cities have been struck. This wave of missile attacks on areas across Ukraine is the first this month, after several devastating rounds in October.

Kryvyi Rih

"Few missile strikes. Stay in shelters," Oleksandr Vilkul, head of Kryvyi Rih city military administration in south-central Ukraine, said briefly on Telegram.

Rivne

At the other end of the country, in the north-west, the city of Rivne was also hit.

"All relevant services are on site. we are working. For now no casualties," said Vitalii Koval, head of the Rivne region military administration.

Sumy

In the northern region of Sumy, which borders Russia, Dmytro Zhyvytskyi, the head of the regional military administration, said that "due to enemy attacks in Sumy city and the region, emergency power outages have been imposed."

Poltava

In the central region of Poltava, Dmytro Lenin, head of the military administration, said there had been a strike in the Kremenchuk district but gave no further details.

Kharkiv

In the northeast of Ukraine, Kharkiv Mayor Ihor Terekhov said that infrastructure has been hit by Russian missiles.

"Critical infrastructure facility was hit. There is no information about casualties at this time. Because of the damage to the facility there are problems with power supply," he said on Telegram. "Ground electric transport and subway have been suspended. Power engineers and utility workers are doing everything to normalize life in Kharkiv as soon as possible."

Kyiv

Kyrylo Tymoshenko, deputy head of the Ukrainian president’s office, said that in Kyiv, "two hits of Russian missiles were detected. Enemy weapons hit residential buildings. Rescuers and doctors are already working on the spot." 

He said several missiles were destroyed by air defense forces.

Other explosions

Air defense was also said to be working in the city of Lviv after officials warned of missile attacks and asked residents to stay in shelters. It's unclear whether explosions in Lviv were missile impacts or the work of air defenses.

9:43 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

Dutch foreign minister, in Kyiv bomb shelter, says to look at "what Russia does, not what it says"

From CNN's Mick Krever in Kyiv

Ukraine's Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, left, and his Dutch counterpart Wopke Hoekstra visit the Holodomor Monument at the National Museum of the Holodomor-Genocide, in Kyiv, Ukraine, on November 15.
Ukraine's Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba, left, and his Dutch counterpart Wopke Hoekstra visit the Holodomor Monument at the National Museum of the Holodomor-Genocide, in Kyiv, Ukraine, on November 15. (Sergey Dolzhenko/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

The Dutch foreign minister, sheltering from a Russian missile attack on the Ukrainian capital Kyiv, told CNN that it was important to pay attention to “what Russia does, not what it says.”

Wopke Hoekstra arrived Tuesday morning for a meeting with Ukrainian officials. The Tuesday missile attack, he said, shows again Russian President Vladimir “Putin’s willingness to resort to criminal methods."

“There can only be one answer to that,” he said. “And that is to continue – continue to support Ukraine, continue to deliver weapons, continue to work on justice, continue to work on the provision of humanitarian aid.”

He said of the missile attack: “If anything, this is only an enormous motivator to stay standing shoulder to shoulder.”

9:34 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

"More missiles coming," Kryvyi Rih official says as air raid sirens ring throughout Ukraine

From CNN's Tim Lister, Vasco Cotovio and Julia Kesaieva

A Ukrainian official in the southern city of Kryvyi Rih has warned residents that more missiles are expected.

"Thanks to the air defense, everything is alright as of now. There are more missiles coming. Stay in shelters," Oleksandr Vilkul, head of Kryvyi Rih city military administration, said on Telegram.

A CNN team in the city reported hearing outgoing launches. 

9:34 a.m. ET, November 15, 2022

"Critical infrastructure" hit in Kharkiv, mayor says

From CNN's Tim Lister, Vasco Cotovio and Julia Kesaieva

In the northeast of Ukraine, Kharkiv Mayor Ihor Terekhov said that infrastructure has been hit by Russian missiles.

"Critical infrastructure facility was hit. There is no information about casualties at this time. Because of the damage to the facility there are problems with power supply."

"Ground electric transport and subway have been suspended. Power engineers and utility workers are doing everything to normalize life in Kharkiv as soon as possible," Terekhov said on Telegram.

Over the past few weeks, Russian missiles have targeted Ukraine's electricity and water infrastructure.