October 5, 2022 Russia-Ukraine news

By Rhea Mogul, Sana Noor Haq, Hannah Strange, Aditi Sangal, Adrienne Vogt, Maureen Chowdhury and Mike Hayes, CNN

Updated 2:24 a.m. ET, October 6, 2022
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6:32 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

EU member states reach "political agreement" on new sanctions against Russia

From CNN’s Alex Hardie and Chris Liakos

European Union foreign policy chief Josep Borrell delivers a speech during a debate on the Russian invasion of Ukraine, during a plenary session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on October 5.
European Union foreign policy chief Josep Borrell delivers a speech during a debate on the Russian invasion of Ukraine, during a plenary session at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, on October 5. (Frederick Florin/AFP/Getty Images)

European Union member states have agreed on a fresh round of sanctions against Russia, according to the Czech Presidency of the EU Council.

“Ambassadors reached a political agreement on new sanctions against Russia -- a strong EU response to Putin's illegal annexation of Ukrainian territories,” the Czech Presidency tweeted Wednesday.

The eighth package of sanctions against Russia -- which was proposed by the European Commission last week -- will include an oil price cap, among other measures.

The package will include prohibition of maritime transport of Russian oil to third countries above the oil price cap, an extended import ban on goods and a ban on providing IT, engineering and legal services to Russian entities, the presidency added.

It will also include new criteria for sanctions circumvention.

“Ambassadors have been working hard on this. Last night they were working, and the committee continued this morning," the bloc's top diplomat Josep Borrell said at the EU Parliament earlier Wednesday.

The package is expected to be published later today.

The agreement follows a proposal from the European Commission last week, ahead of Moscow's illegal annexation of four regions in Ukraine.

Other Western allies have also leveled new sanctions against Russia in the wake of Putin's announcement.

The White House announced it was imposing "swift and severe costs" on Russia on Friday, including sanctions against the head of Russia's central bank, Elvira Nabiullina, a figure the Biden administration said is key to the country's economy.

The UK has unveiled new bans on exports of goods and services to Russia. On Tuesday, it also added Sergei Vladimirovich Yeliseyev, the deputy prime minister of the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad and the head of Moscow-backed authorities in Kherson, to its list of sanctioned individuals.

8:19 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Russian forces are "regrouping," says pro-Russian leader in Kherson, amid Ukrainian offensive

From Olga Voitovych in Kyiv

The Russian-appointed deputy leader in the occupied Kherson region has sought to explain Ukraine’s rapid advance in recent days by saying that the Russian military was “regrouping.”

"The Russian army is conducting maneuvers,” Kirill Stremousov told Russian state news RIA Novosti. “The regrouping of the front in the current conditions allows us to gather strength and strike.”

The Russian Defense Ministry also used the phrase "regrouping" in September to describe the retreat of the Russian military in response to Ukraine’s military operation that recaptured the key city of Izyum, in the northeastern Kharkiv region.

Stremousov on Wednesday claimed that Ukraine’s advance had been stopped, and that it was “impossible” for them to enter the occupied city of Kherson.

Earlier Wednesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law measures that claim to annex Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia and Kherson into the Russian Federation.

The annexations are illegal under international law and have been dismissed by world leaders as the result of “sham” referendums held at gunpoint.

Moscow does not fully control the regions it claims to have annexed, as Kyiv punctures Russia's defenses and makes key territorial gains amid a sweeping offensive across Ukraine's south and east.

CNN's Mick Krever, Josh Pennington and Rob Picheta contributed reporting.

4:30 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Ukrainian official urges West to forget the "illusion" of Russian normality

From CNN's Mick Krever

Russian President Vladimir Putin with Ukrainian separatist leaders Vladimir Saldo, left, Yevgeniy Balitsky, second left, Leonid Pasechnik, right, and Denis Pushilin, second right, during the annexation ceremony of four Ukrainian regions at the Kremlin on September 30.
Russian President Vladimir Putin with Ukrainian separatist leaders Vladimir Saldo, left, Yevgeniy Balitsky, second left, Leonid Pasechnik, right, and Denis Pushilin, second right, during the annexation ceremony of four Ukrainian regions at the Kremlin on September 30. (Getty Images)

A top Ukrainian official on Wednesday urged Western leaders to stop thinking about Russia through a lens of “normality,” in which negotiations are a possibility.

“Western politicians must get rid of ‘RF's normality’ illusion, with the negotiating possibility,” said Mykhailo Podolyak, adviser to the head of the office of the Ukrainian President, referring to the Russian Federation.
“Listen to Putin's speeches. Imbued with contempt for Western world, traditional system of international relations and international law. His dream is Europe under the ‘Russian boot.’”

Earlier on Wednesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed into law measures that claim to annex four Ukrainian regions into the Russian Federation. The claimed annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia and Kherson are illegal under international law.

4:15 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Zelensky calls for "special tribunal" to pursue Russian leadership for crimes against Ukraine

From CNN's From Mick Krever

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers an address via video link to the participants of the public debate "War and Law" in Paris, France, on October 4.
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky delivers an address via video link to the participants of the public debate "War and Law" in Paris, France, on October 4. (President of Ukraine)

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky on Wednesday called for the creation of a “special tribunal” to pursue Russian political and military leaders for their role in the invasion of Ukraine.

“We must bring to justice those whose decisions started all this,” he told a conference in Paris. “Those who committed the original crime. A crime in which all the evil shown by the Russian occupiers is concentrated.
“And we still do not have such an institutional basis to hold the Russian political and military leadership accountable for the crime of aggression.”

Zelensky praised the work of the International Criminal Court for investigating alleged crimes committed by Russian troops on Ukrainian territory. But he added that “for the original crime of armed aggression to receive a fair answer as well, we must supplement the activities of the International Criminal Court.”

“A special tribunal should be established for the crime of aggression against Ukraine. So that it can punish those who, unfortunately, cannot be reached by the International Criminal Court and all other available judicial institutions of the world,” Zelensky said.
"You all know how the leadership of Russia, hiding behind false stories about state sovereignty, avoids fair responsibility for what it has done. We have to overcome that."
4:47 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Miss Crimea fined by Russian authorities for singing patriotic Ukrainian song

From CNN's Olga Voitovych in Kyiv

The winner of Miss Crimea 2022 Olga Valeeva poses for an Instagram selfie.
The winner of Miss Crimea 2022 Olga Valeeva poses for an Instagram selfie. (olga_rijjylya/Instagram)

The winner of Miss Crimea 2022 has been fined 40,000 Russian rubles ($680) by occupying Russian authorities for singing a patriotic Ukrainian song, according to Russian state media and pro-Russia regional authorities.

Olga Valeeva was spared a jail sentence because she has young children, Russian state news agency TASS reported. Her friend was sentenced to 10 days detention.

“In Crimea, no one is punished for normal Ukrainian songs,” Oleg Kriuchkov, adviser to the Russian administration head of occupied Crimea, said on Telegram
“But! No one will allow nationalist hymns to be sung here! If you want to sing ‘Chervona Kalyna’ or ‘Our father is Bandera...’ we will provide a platform – we will take you to neutral territory to Nikolaev or Zaporozhzhia. Sing all you want!”

What she sang: “Chervona Kalyna” is a patriotic Ukrainian song that has gained virality over the course of Russia’s full-scale invasion, including a cover version by Pink Floyd. The lyrics urge the Ukrainian nation to rise up and “rejoice” like a red kalyna shrub (“chervona kalyna”) that has drooped in the field.

The Ukrainian region of Crimea was illegally annexed by Russian in 2014.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Internal Affairs in Crimea said that it identified a video online in which “two girls sang a song that is the battle anthem of an extremist organization.”

The two were detained on suspicion of “committing illegal actions aimed at discrediting the use of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, as well as publicly displaying prohibited symbols," the spokesperson added. They were subsequently found guilty by a court, the ministry said.

Correction: An earlier version of this post misstated the reason why Valeeva was spared jail. According to Russian state media, it is because she has young children.

3:30 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

In rare state TV admission, Russian war correspondent acknowledges Kherson losses

From CNN's Josh Pennington

Russian war correspondent Alexander Sladkov at the Ostankino TV Center in Moscow on June, 23, 2021.
Russian war correspondent Alexander Sladkov at the Ostankino TV Center in Moscow on June, 23, 2021. (Anton Novoderezhkin/TASS/ZUMA Press)

A top Russian war correspondent on Tuesday conceded on state television that Russian forces had endured significant losses at the hands of Ukraine’s counteroffensive, saying “we are still learning.”

“In the Kherson region, we have lost 17 settlements,” Alexander Sladkov said, placing the blame on “fat” US weapons deliveries and “intelligence gathered via satellite reconnaissance.”

Sladkov is one of several Russian reporters in recent days to convey the losses Moscow is suffering in Ukraine.

War correspondent Alexander Kots told his Telegram followers Tuesday that the military was in “operational crisis,” while state media reporter Evgeniy Poddubnyy said, “for the time being it will become even harder.”

Sladkov, however, tried to put a positive spin on things.

“This doesn’t mean that we’ve collapsed like a house of cards. These mistakes aren’t gigantic strategic failures. We are still learning," he said. "I know this is hard to hear in our eighth month of the special operation. But we are reporters. We are waiting for reinforcements," he added, referring to Russian men conscripted as part of a "special mobilization" declared by President Vladimir Putin last month.
8:19 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Putin signs laws claiming to annex 4 Ukrainian regions

From CNN's Mick Krever, Josh Pennington and Rob Picheta

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks in Moscow on September 30.
Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks in Moscow on September 30. (Getty Images)

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed into law measures that claim to annex four Ukrainian regions into the Russian Federation.

The claimed annexations of Donetsk, Luhansk, Zaporizhzhia and Kherson are illegal under international law.

Leaders around the world have said they are the result of “sham” referendums held at gunpoint, and will never be recognized.

However, the move is an important step in Russia’s faltering effort to seize control in Ukraine, with Putin claiming that the will of occupied Ukrainians is to belong to Russia — offering a false pretext to his efforts to claim the occupied territories as Moscow’s.

Western officials have previously suggested that Putin will likely seek to reframe Ukraine's counteroffensive in the four regions and any others as an attack on Russia sovereignty.

Some context: Russia does not fully control the regions it claims to have annexed and Moscow is losing territory to the Ukrainian military in the south and east of the country by the day. In some areas, such as Kherson, those losses are coming at a rapid pace.

The Kremlin does not even appear to be clear on the borders of the territory it is annexing. Spokesperson Dmitry Peskov on Monday said “we will continue consulting with the population of these regions.”

A regional Ukrainian official in the Zaporizhzhia region said on Tuesday that Russia was trying to establish a “state border” at the Vasylivka checkpoint, which separates Russian-held territory from the rest of Ukraine, including the regional capital of Zaporizhzhia.

8:19 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Retreating Russians are leaving mines near Kherson, Ukrainian military says

From CNN's Mick Krever in London and Olga Voitovych in Kyiv

Russian troops are leaving mines in southern Ukrainian villages as they retreat along the western bank of the Dnieper River, the Ukrainian military said on Wednesday.

“Leaving the settlements in the Kherson region, the enemy mines infrastructure facilities and private houses, prohibits any movement of local residents,” the General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine said in its morning briefing. 

It comes as Ukrainian forces have made additional gains in the south, pushing toward the occupied city of Kherson and capturing the town of Zolota Balka on the western bank of the Dnipro river, according to a regional official and pro-Russian military blogger.

Conscription claims: The Ukrainian Armed Forces also claimed Wednesday that pro-Russian authorities in occupied areas of Ukraine were “trying to compensate for the loss of personnel” on the battlefield by conscripting Ukrainians into the Russian military.

“According to the available information, men from Luhansk, without conducting a medical commission and training, after mobilization are immediately sent to replenish the units that suffered the greatest losses,” the General Staff said.

Ukrainian officials have been warning for some time that Russia planned to use its claimed annexations as a pretext to draft Ukrainians in occupied areas.

On Monday, the Ukrainian military said Russian troops were carrying out “door-to-door” checks in occupied areas of Ukraine, looking for young men of conscription age, adding that Moscow had stepped up document inspections at checkpoints.

1:29 a.m. ET, October 5, 2022

Ukraine says at least 1 dead after Russian forces strike multiple targets with Iran-supplied "kamikaze drones"

From CNN's Jonny Hallam and Josh Pennington

Governor of the Kyiv region, Oleksiy Kuleba, speaks during an interview in Kyiv on March 8.
Governor of the Kyiv region, Oleksiy Kuleba, speaks during an interview in Kyiv on March 8. (Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters)

Russian forces on Wednesday launched repeated attacks with Iranian-supplied "kamikaze drones" against targets in Ukraine's Kyiv region and to the south in Odesa, killing at least one person, according to Ukrainian officials. 

"There have been a repeated series of kamikaze drone strikes on Bila Tserkva infrastructure," Oleksiy Kuleba, head of the Kyiv region state administration, posted on Telegram. "There are fires at infrastructure facilities. There is one victim."

Kuleba added emergency crews were responding and asked all Kyiv residents "to remain in their shelters."  

"The danger is still present," Kuleba warned, as air raid sirens sounded in the region.

Kirilo Tymoshenko, deputy head of Ukraine's presidential office, said Russian forces had also launched an attack on the southern port city of Odesa with a "Shahed-136" kamikaze drone. 

Tymoshenko said Ukrainian air defense forces were able to "detect and destroy the enemy's drone over the sea," in a post on his Telegram account.

Unverified videos posted on social media Wednesday showed fire and plumes of smoke in the night sky following the attack on Bila Tserkva south of Kyiv.

Some context: US intelligence warned in July that Tehran planned to send Russia “hundreds” of bomb-carrying drones for use in the war in Ukraine. In August, a US official told CNN Russian troops were believed to have been training on the Iranian built drones for several weeks.

Iran began showcasing the Shahed-191 and Shahed-129 drones, also known as UAVs or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, to Russia at Kashan Airfield south of Tehran in June, US officials told CNN. 

Both types of drones are capable of carrying precision-guided missiles.