Deval Patrick

Former governor of Massachusetts
Jump to  stances on the issues
Deval Patrick dropped out of the presidential race on February 12, 2020. This page is no longer being updated.
Patrick made a late entrance into the race in November 2019 after initially passing on a presidential bid. The former two-term Massachusetts governor is pitching himself as a leader who can bring people together.
Harvard College, B.A., 1978; Harvard Law School, J.D., 1982
July 31, 1956
Diane Bemus
Presbyterian
Sarah and Katherine
Managing director, Bain Capital, 2015-2019;
Governor of Massachusetts, 2007-2015;
Board of directors, ACC Capitol holdings, 2004-2006;
Executive vice president and general counsel, Coca Cola 2001-2004;
Vice president and general counsel, Texaco, 1999-2001;
Lawyer, law firm Day, Berry &
HowardAssistant US attorney general for civil rights, 1994-1997;
Lawyer and later partner, law firm Hill &
Barlow, 1986-1994;
Lawyer at NAACP Legal Defense Fund, 1983-1986

PATRICK IN THE NEWS

Joe Biden is endorsed by Deval Patrick, another former 2020 contender
Updated 4:48 PM ET, Fri Mar 6, 2020
Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick on Friday joined several other former 2020 presidential candidates in endorsing Joe Biden for president. "At a time when our democracy is at risk, our economy is not working for many Americans, and our role in the world is unsteady, America needs a unifying and experienced leader, who can and wants to make life better for everyone everywhere. Joe Biden is that leader," Patrick said in a statement provided by the Biden campaign. Visit CNN's Election Center for full coverage of the 2020 race "I am today proud to endorse him for the Democratic nomination for President," Patrick continued. He joins former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, former Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former Maryland Rep. John Delaney in endorsing Biden this week. Buttigieg, Klobuchar and O'Rourke endorsed Biden on Monday, right before the Super Tuesday contests. Biden surged after his blowout win in South Carolina, and the Democratic centrist establishment has consolidated around the former vice president. CNN projected Biden would win 10 out of 14 states on Super Tuesday, including a dramatic upset victory in Texas and surprise wins in Minnesota and Massachusetts. Patrick said that when he was governor of Massachusetts he worked closely with Biden, who was vice president at the time. "I saw firsthand Joe's essential role in passing historic health care reform, saving the American auto industry and our country from another depression, leading our troops home from war, and championing historic civil rights and LGBTQ equality," Patrick said. He praised Biden's work on a number of other issues, and called the candidate a "genuinely caring and compassionate person." Patrick ended his own late-entry presidential bid in February after a disappointing performance in the New Hampshire primary. He had campaigned as a moderate, calling for a public option to be added to Obamacare rather than supporting "Medicare for All," a proposed government-run single-payer health care program.
READ MORE

STANCES ON THE ISSUES

climate crisis
Close Accordion Pane
After announcing his campaign in November 2019, Patrick named climate change as a priority.“We’re already late to climate change. The question is whether we are too late and if we continue to delay we will be too late,” he said in Iowa, The Gazette reported. In 2014, Patrick unveiled a $50 million plan while governor to assess and address vulnerabilities in Massachusetts surrounding climate preparedness. In 2014, Patrick called for Massachusetts to end all reliance on conventional coal generation by 2018 and move to natural gas. He said the state should migrate away from fossil fuels and double down on solar, wind and hydropower.
economy
Open Accordion Pane
Patrick told CBS News in November 2019 he believes taxes should go up on the most wealthy. He said he envisions a “much, much simpler tax system for everyone where we eliminate all or most of the deductions and we smooth out and simplify the system we have.” He said he thinks greed is the problem, not wealth.
education
Open Accordion Pane
Patrick told CBS News in November 2019 that he would support eliminating or vastly reducing student debt. In 2007, Patrick unveiled a plan to make community college free in Massachusetts within 10 years. The plan also called for universal prekindergarten, full-day kindergarten and extending the school day and school year. In 2010, Patrick signed a bill to increase the number of charter schools in the state, give administrators the power to overhaul failing districts and make Massachusetts eligible for up to $250 million in federal dollars.
gun violence
Open Accordion Pane
Patrick in 2014 signed into law an overhaul of Massachusetts’ gun laws. The legislation added the state to a national database for background checks, and allowed police chiefs to go to court to block individuals they deemed dangerous from acquiring shotguns and rifles.
healthcare
Open Accordion Pane
Patrick told CBS News in November 2019 he did not support “Medicare for All” “in the terms we’ve been talking about,” and that he backs a public option. “If Medicare is that public option, I think it’s a great idea,” he said. Patrick last year called Medicare for All a “terrific idea” but said he would support keeping private options under the Affordable Care Act.
immigration
Open Accordion Pane
In 2018, Patrick called for overhauling immigration and was critical of the Trump administration’s immigration policy, including the actions from US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. “The sadistic policies and practices of ICE today have got to go, separating families, the walking away from DACA, the deportation of spouses of immigrants who serve in the military today. Really?” Patrick told CNN’s Jake Tapper. “We are better than that. And the opportunity to have comprehensive immigration reform has been on the table before. There is bipartisan support for it. It needs to come back. We need to be serious about it.”

LATEST POLITICAL NEWS

Ecuador revokes citizenship of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange
Updated 3:40 AM ET, Wed Jul 28, 2021
An Ecuadorian court on Monday ruled in favor of revoking the citizenship of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to a judgment published by the Judicial Branch of Ecuador. The court's decision nullified Assange's status as a naturalized citizen of Ecuador, which was granted to him in December 2017 by then-President Lenín Moreno. Carlos Poveda, Assange's lawyer in Ecuador, told CNN that he would appeal the ruling. Assange, an Australian, spent nearly seven years holed up in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London protected by asylum status, avoiding extradition to Sweden. He was eventually arrested in 2019 by London's Metropolitan Police in connection with bail-skipping charges and a separate extradition warrant from the United States Justice Department on a charge of conspiracy to steal military secrets, stemming from WikiLeaks' publication of classified documents. His arrest came after the Ecuadorian embassy lost patience with the WikiLeaks founder and revoked his asylum status. At the time, then-Foreign Minister José Valencia and then-Interior Minister María Paula Romo accused Assange of riding scooters around the cramped embassy hallways, insulting staff and smearing feces on the walls. Valencia also accused Assange of making "false claims" in his naturalization application documents. The Ecuadorian government had also been annoyed by Assange's vocal support for the Catalonian independence movement, which the South American country worried could damage its relations with Spain. Assange is currently in prison in the United Kingdom for violating his bail conditions when he entered Ecuador's London embassy to elude extradition to Sweden. Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation of sexual molestation and coercion against him in 2015 and their investigation into rape allegations in 2020. In January a British judge rejected Washington's request to extradite Assange to the US, ruling that such a move would be "oppressive" by reason of his mental health.
READ MORE