Amy Klobuchar

Senator from Minnesota
Jump to  stances on the issues
Amy Klobuchar dropped out of the presidential race on March 2, 2020. This page is no longer being updated.
Klobuchar has touted her Midwestern roots and ability to work across the aisle to pass legislation while campaigning as a moderate choice. She was first elected to the US Senate in 2006.
Yale University, B.A. (1982); University of Chicago Law School, J.D. (1985)
May 25, 1960
John Bessler
Congregationalist (United Church of Christ)
Abigail
Hennepin County attorney, 1999-2007;
Partner at the law firm Gray, Plant, Mooty, Mooty and Bennett in Minneapolis, 1993-1998;
Attorney, and later partner at the law firm Dorsey and Whitney in Minneapolis, 1985-1993

KLOBUCHAR IN THE NEWS

2020 Presidential Debates Fast Facts
Updated 1:56 PM ET, Tue Oct 27, 2020
Here's a look at the 2020 presidential debates. June 26, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Miami, Florida Hosts: NBC News, MSNBC and Telemundo Moderators: José Diaz-Balart, Savannah Guthrie, Lester Holt, Rachel Maddow and Chuck Todd Participants: Cory Booker, Julián Castro, Bill de Blasio, John Delaney, Tulsi Gabbard, Jay Inslee, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Tim Ryan, Elizabeth Warren Transcript June 27, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Miami, Florida Hosts: NBC News, MSNBC and Telemundo Moderators: José Diaz-Balart, Savannah Guthrie, Lester Holt, Rachel Maddow and Chuck Todd Participants: Michael Bennet, Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, John Hickenlooper, Bernie Sanders, Eric Swalwell, Marianne Williamson, Andrew Yang Transcript July 30, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Detroit, Michigan Hosts: CNN, CNN International and CNN en Español Moderators: Dana Bash, Don Lemon and Jake Tapper Participants: Steve Bullock, Pete Buttigieg, John Delaney, John Hickenlooper, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Tim Ryan, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Marianne Williamson Transcript July 31, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Detroit, Michigan Hosts: CNN, CNN International and CNN en Español Moderators: Dana Bash, Don Lemon and Jake Tapper Participants: Michael Bennet, Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Julián Castro, Bill de Blasio, Tulsi Gabbard, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Jay Inslee, Andrew Yang Transcript September 12, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Houston, Texas Hosts: ABC News and Univision Moderators: Linsey Davis, David Muir, Jorge Ramos and George Stephanopoulos Participants: Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Pete Buttigieg, Julián Castro, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Andrew Yang Transcript October 15, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Westerville, Ohio Hosts: CNN and The New York Times Moderators: Erin Burnett, Anderson Cooper and Marc Lacey Participants: Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Pete Buttigieg, Julián Castro, Tulsi Gabbard, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren and Andrew Yang Transcripts: 8pm ET, 9pm ET, 10pm ET November 20, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Atlanta Hosts: MSNBC and The Washington Post Moderators: Rachel Maddow, Andrea Mitchell, Ashley Parker and Kristen Welker Participants: Joe Biden, Cory Booker, Pete Buttigieg, Tulsi Gabbard, Kamala Harris, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren and Andrew Yang Transcript December 19, 2019 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Los Angeles Hosts: PBS NewsHour and Politico Moderators: Tim Alberta, Yamiche Alcindor, Amna Nawaz and Judy Woodruff Participants: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren and Andrew Yang Transcript January 14, 2020 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Des Moines, Iowa Hosts: CNN and Des Moines Register Moderators: Wolf Blitzer, Brianne Pfannenstiel and Abby Phillip Participants: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer and Elizabeth Warren Transcripts: 9pm ET, 10pm ET February 7, 2020 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Manchester, New Hampshire Hosts: ABC, Apple News and WMUR-TV Moderators: Linsey Davis, Monica Hernandez, David Muir, Adam Sexton and George Stephanopoulos Participants: Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer, Elizabeth Warren and Andrew Yang February 19, 2020 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Las Vegas, Nevada Hosts: MSNBC, NBC News, The Nevada Independent and Telemundo Moderators: Vanessa Hauc, Lester Holt, Hallie Jackson, Jon Ralston and Chuck Todd Participants: Joe Biden, Michael Bloomberg, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren Transcript February 25, 2020 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Charleston, South Carolina Hosts: CBS News, the Congressional Black Caucus Institute and Twitter Moderators: Margaret Brennan, Major Garrett, Gayle King, Norah O'Donnell and Bill Whitaker Participants: Joe Biden, Michael Bloomberg, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders, Tom Steyer and Elizabeth Warren Transcript March 15, 2020 Event Type: Democratic Debate Location: Washington, DC Hosts: CNN and Univision Moderators: Dana Bash, Ilia Calderón and Jake Tapper Participants: Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders Transcript September 29, 2020 Event Type: First Presidential Debate Location: Cleveland, Ohio Hosts: Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic Moderator: Chris Wallace Participants: Joe Biden and Donald Trump Transcript October 7, 2020 Event Type: Vice Presidential Debate Location: Salt Lake City, Utah Hosts: The University of Utah Moderator: Susan Page Participants: Kamala Harris and Mike Pence Transcript October 15, 2020 October 9, 2020 - The Commission on Presidential Debates cancels the second presidential debate after Trump declines to do a virtual debate despite concerns over his Covid-19 diagnosis. October 22, 2020 Event Type: Third Presidential Debate Location: Nashville, Tennessee Hosts: Belmont University Moderator: Kristen Welker Participants: Joe Biden and Donald Trump Transcript
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STANCES ON THE ISSUES

climate crisis
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Klobuchar dedicated a portion of her announcement speech to climate, saying that within her first 100 days in office, she would “reinstate the clean power rules and the gas mileage standards and put forth sweeping legislation to invest in green jobs and infrastructure.” Klobuchar in September 2019 released a climate plan to put the US on a path to 100% net-zero emissions by 2050 through “sweeping” legislative revisions. Klobuchar has committed to rejoining the Paris climate accord, a 2015 landmark deal on global warming targets that Trump has pledged to abandon, on “Day One.” While she has co-sponsored the Green New Deal – the broad plan to address renewable-energy infrastructure and climate change proposed by Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York – she has said in multiple interviews that she sees the bill as more “aspirational” than a solid legislative proposal. More on Klobuchar’s climate crisis policy
economy
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Klobuchar has said the Trump corporate tax cuts in 2017 went “way too far.” She would raise the corporate tax rate to 25%, something she says would provide $100 billion to pay for “people’s roads and bridges.” Under a retirement savings plan she introduced in the Senate, she would return the household tax rate to 39.6% for top earners. She opposes the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement – a successor deal to the North American Free Trade Agreement negotiated by Trump – as it is written and has called for changes. She has said she believes “we need to be doing everything we can to help American farmers sell more of their products in foreign markets.” Klobuchar has called for equal pay and is a co-sponsor of the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would provide remedies for wage discrimination. More on Klobuchar’s economic policy
education
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Klobuchar rolled out her education plan in July 2019, pledging to roll back a host of Trump’s education priorities, including a school choice tax credit, a plan that critics believe would take money away from public schools. She has previously expressed support for free community college and expanded financial aid for low-income students – but is against making all public colleges free. “I am not for free four-year college for all, no,” Klobuchar said in February 2019 at a CNN town hall. “If I was a magic genie and could afford to give that to everyone, I would.” The senator does not support wiping out all student debt, but does back expanding loan forgiveness for people in “in-demand jobs” and refinancing student loans at lower rates. More on Klobuchar’s education policy
gun violence
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Klobuchar has sought to explain her view on guns through her home state of Minnesota and her family’s love of hunting. With that standard in mind, Klobuchar says she supports banning so-called assault weapons, bump stocks and high-capacity magazines. She has also backed universal background checks. “We should join the majority of Americans and actually many gun owners in having the courage to pass common-sense gun safety legislation,” Klobuchar said at a CNN town hall in February 2019. The senator has also proposed closing the “boyfriend loophole” in order to stop people who abused their dating partners from buying or owning firearms. More on Klobuchar’s gun violence policy
healthcare
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Klobuchar has voiced skepticism about “Medicare for All” legislation, which would create a government-run health care plan and essentially eliminate the private insurance industry. During the first Democratic primary debate in June 2019, she expressed concern about “kicking half of America off of their health insurance in four years.” Instead, she supports creating a government-run public option, which she has said could be done by expanding Medicare or Medicaid. She also wants to strengthen the Affordable Care Act, promising to take executive action to do so during her first 100 days in office by increasing federal subsidies for premiums and out-of-pocket expenses, as well as other methods. Also during her first 100 days, Klobuchar said, she would allow the importation of drugs from countries such as Canada. And she supports allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices. More on Klobuchar’s health care policy
immigration
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Klobuchar supports comprehensive immigration revisions, including a pathway to citizenship for immigrants who are in the country legally, refugees who have been in the country for decades and undocumented immigrants who were brought to the US as children and qualified for protections under Obama’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. She has said she would issue an executive order to end family separation at the border and to reunify children already separated from their parents. She does not support abolishing Immigration and Customs Enforcement and instead would opt to overhaul the law enforcement agency. The senator is opposed to building a wall across the entire US-Mexico border but has called for “smart border protection,” including improved fencing and technology. More on Klobuchar’s immigration policy

LATEST POLITICAL NEWS

White House tells refugee advocates Biden likely to raise cap quickly
Updated 12:48 PM ET, Sat Apr 17, 2021
White House officials signaled in a conference call with refugee resettlement advocates late Friday that President Joe Biden is likely to raise the current refugee cap of 15,000 quickly, well ahead of the May 15 deadline set Friday, according to a person familiar with the matter. Deputy national security adviser Jon Finer told the advocates that Biden wants to work quickly to bring the refugees who have already been vetted and cleared to the United States after a prolonged delay, in which many of their flights were canceled. The call comes after the White House faced immediate blowback from refugee groups and Democratic and progressive lawmakers for initially saying Friday that Biden would keep this fiscal year's refugee cap of 15,000, and not raise the cap as he had promised to do -- a significant reversal from the Biden administration's proposal in February to lift the cap to 62,500. After the flood of criticism, the White House backtracked later Friday and announced Biden would set a "final, increased" refugee cap by mid-May, but added that it's "unlikely" the number would be as high as the 62,500 cap proposed earlier this year. Biden, a Democrat, took office aiming to set a new course for US immigration policy, including a more compassionate approach, following former Republican President Donald Trump's hardline policies and vilification of refugees. But his initial decision to not change the Trump administration's refugee cap of 15,000 for this fiscal year, the lowest since 1980, put him at odds with his promises as a candidate and on track to admit fewer refugees than any other US president in history, according to the humanitarian group International Rescue Committee. Biden announced in February that his administration would bring the cap up to 125,000 refugees during his first full fiscal year in office and signed an executive order intended to rebuild and enhance the programs in place to pave the way for more arrivals to the US. Finer said on the call that the 125,000 figure that Biden had floated is an "aspirational number" but remains the administration's goal and is going to be "a major challenge," according to a source familiar with the call. Pressed on the call why the Biden administration is on track to have the worst year of refugee admissions in the program's history, Finer insisted that "this will not be the number that we end on," according to the source familiar. Finer also claimed that the refugee admissions program was "even more decimated than we thought," with less staffing to deal with processing capacity and a security vetting process that's slow moving, according to the source familiar. The White House had said Friday that a "factor" in the decision was that the Office of Refugee Resettlement, a federal agency under the Health and Human Services Department, had limited capacity, given the growing number of migrants arriving at the US-Mexico border. Finer said that the administration wanted to be sure that it could meet its responsibilities to support both refugees trying to resettle in the US and unaccompanied children arriving at the southern border. But refugee resettlement agencies have repeatedly said they're prepared to take in refugee arrivals. The State Department presented Congress with a proposal to expand the Trump-era refugee cap to allow up to 62,500 refugees to be resettled in the US, which was in line with Biden's campaign commitment to raise the refugee ceiling. But Biden delayed approving the proposal increase, resulting in the cancellation of hundreds of resettlement flights and leaving thousands of people who had expected to arrive in the US in limbo. Sources had told CNN that Biden resisted signing off on increasing the Trump-era refugee cap due to political optics, when the administration is facing heat over its handling of an influx of migrants at the US-Mexico border despite it being a separate situation from the refugee program. On Friday, Biden signed the emergency presidential determination that returned to regional allocations, effectively casting a wider net of who can resettle in the US under the current 15,000 refugee ceiling. As of March 31, only 2,050 refugees had been admitted to the US this fiscal year, according to the Refugee Processing Center. This story has been updated with more details from the call.
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