Michael Bloomberg

Former mayor of New York
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Michael Bloomberg dropped out of the presidential race on March 4, 2020. This page is no longer being updated.
Bloomberg made a late entry into the 2020 Democratic race in November 2019, offering a more moderate vision for the country and casting himself as a problem solver. He served as New York City’s mayor from 2002 to 2013 and is the co-founder, CEO, and owner of Bloomberg L.P., a privately-held financial, software, data, and media company.
Johns Hopkins University, B.S., 1964; Harvard University, MBA, 1966
February 14, 1942
Diana Taylor (partner); divorced from Susan Brown
Jewish
Emma and Georgina
Co-founder, Bloomberg LP (previously named Innovative Market Systems), 1982-present;
Investment banker, Salomon Brothers, 1966-1981
BLOOMBERG IN THE NEWS
Biden makes pitch as an empathetic leader in new digital ad
Updated 5:58 PM ET, Tue Mar 31, 2020
Joe Biden describes the coronavirus crisis as a "war" and frontline workers as "soldiers" in a new digital ad that will air in battleground states. "This is a war, and these are our soldiers," Biden says, speaking directly to the camera as video of paramedics and nurses providing care amidst the pandemic cuts in and out. "As President, I wouldn't send an American soldier anywhere in the world without all the equipment and protection they need. We should not do any less for the heroes on the frontlines in this battle we're in now." In an attempt to offer an implicit contrast with President Donald Trump, the Biden campaign is using the ad to show the former vice president as someone who can empathize with Americans during difficult times -- a strategy they have employed since the outbreak of the pandemic. While the campaign has launched a handful of negative ads criticizing Trump's handling of the crisis, this is the first ad showcasing Biden's empathy without mentioning the current President's name. The ad will air on Facebook and Instagram as part of a previous digital ad buy in battleground states, including Wisconsin, which still intends to hold a primary election on April 7. The campaign has spent about $870,000 on Facebook ads in the last week and nearly $9.4 million on the social media platform to date. Biden pointedly says in the ad that the crisis is "unlike anything" the nation has faced before but adds that he "couldn't be prouder" of the response of the American people. The United States is seeing the "soul of this nation" on display, he says, invoking his campaign's mantra. The ad ends with Biden on camera: "The American people have never, ever, ever let their country down. We've just got to give them all they need -- now." During a CNN town hall Friday night, Biden issued a similar, uplifting message, broadcasting from his in-home studio in his Wilmington, Delaware home. "We are seeing the soul of America now. Take a look at what is happening. Everywhere you look, you see people reaching out to help people," Biden said. "This is an incredible nation. The American people are generous, decent, good, fair, bright, and it makes you so proud to be an American." In a time when the 2020 election has effectively come to a halt with the cancellation of in-person campaigning, the Biden campaign -- after a rush of momentum at the beginning of March led to the former vice president claiming the front-runner status -- has struggled to break through into the national conversation surrounding the pandemic. Biden had an in-home studio installed and has put it to use almost daily, hosting virtual town halls, round tables and press briefings and making TV appearances.
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STANCES ON THE ISSUES
climate crisis
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Bloomberg said, if elected, he would make climate a top priority. The US would rejoin the Paris climate accord, the landmark 2015 global agreement on global warming targets. He has said he wants the US to create a clean energy economy and has vowed to create renewable energy jobs. Previously, he worked as the UN secretary-general’s special envoy for climate action, and he has worked with cities, states and businesses to address the climate crisis.
economy
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Bloomberg has vowed to create a housing proposal and an earned income tax credit to provide economic opportunity for all Americans. His housing proposal would expand funding for the Low-Income Housing Tax Credit, and would increase federal spending for programs like the Public Housing Capital Fund, the HOME program and Community Development Block Grants. He proposes revising the Earned Income Tax Credit and raising the incomes of low-wage workers. By 2025, he wants to increase the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Bloombergwrote in an op-ed in December 2017 that, in order to achieve revenue-neutral tax restructuring, he was in favor of reducing the 35% corporate tax rate. He criticized President Donald Trump’s 2017 tax overhaul as an “economically indefensible blunder that will harm our future.”
education
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Bloomberg would make it a top national priority to increase student achievement, college preparedness and career readiness. He says he leads national efforts to increase the number of lower-income students enrolled in top colleges, and that as mayor, he strengthened standards and created more quality school options. He says he increased graduation rates, increased the education budget and opened new schools. While he was mayor of New York, a state law placed the New York public school system under mayoral control. Bloomberg supported the move, and used the power to open new schools, champion charter schools and close poor-performing schools. He was often at odds with the United Federation of Teachers.
gun violence
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In 2014, Bloomberg pledged to spend $50 million to build a nationwide grassroots network to combat the National Rifle Association. He founded the umbrella group Everytown for Gun Safety, which brought together groups he already funded: Mayors Against Illegal Guns and Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. A goal of the groups was to try to “expand the background check system for gun buyers both at the state and national levels,” according to The New York Times. If elected, Bloomberg says, he would continue to back common-sense gun policies. More on Bloomberg’s gun violence policy
healthcare
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Bloomberg said the US should expand Obamacare and Medicare in order to achieve universal coverage. His campaign website reads: “As a mayor, businessman, and philanthropist, Mike has pioneered bold health initiatives that have cleaned the air we breathe, expanded access to prenatal and postnatal care, increased screenings for breast and prostate cancer, dramatically cut teen smoking, and reduced injuries and deaths on roads.” Bloomberg said “Medicare for All” would “bankrupt us for a very long time,” The New York Times reported in January 2019. “I think you could never afford that. You’re talking about trillions of dollars,” he said of the single-payer health plan. As mayor, Bloomberg pushed for New York City to ban smoking in all restaurants and bars and for big soft drinks to be banned.
immigration
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Bloomberg founded New American Economy, a pro-immigration coalition of business leaders and mayors that aims to reach the public and policymakers. In 2018, the group targeted senators with a TV and phone campaign to urge them to protect so-called Dreamers, undocumented immigrants who came to the US as children.
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