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Previously known for renowned motocross goggles, 100 Percent is finally bringing its expertise to the slopes. An iconic brand, dedicated as much to design as to performance, 100 Percent recently debuted three new great-looking goggles for skiers and snowboarders — promising the same attention to comfort and visual clarity, albeit in a very different type of frame.

The Norg is 100 Percent’s flagship model, and the unique geometric style—with a molded ridge around the nose and bottom of the lens—guarantees you’ll stand out on the mountain. But beyond looking cool AF, these goggles were built to handle all kinds of terrain and conditions. I put them to the test during a day of skiing at Solitude Mountain in Utah.

100 Percent has finally lent its expertise to snow goggles, and the Norg is its flagship product. Gorgeously styled with a unique design built for comfort, these goggles are the perfect companion for any snowy terrain.

What we liked

Easy to swap lenses

Different light conditions on the mountain call for different lenses. A number of companies make interchangeable goggle lenses, but the ones on the Norg were the easiest I’ve used yet. For starters, the lens sits in a super flexible mold (with the lens removed, you can literally twist it like you would wring out a wet washcloth without comprising the structure). Then, embedded in the frame are eight secure magnetic touch points that correspond to magnets in the lens, making it a cinch to peel off one lens and pop on another. My fingers lose all mobility in the cold, and I was still able to swap out my lenses between runs while my hands were encased in bulky ski gloves.

The clarity of the lenses

Being able to see the details in the snow can be the difference between shredding and “yard sale”-ing down the mountain. The entire Norg goggle was designed to support crystal clear optics: that soft, flexible frame wraps around a super stiff lens—made from shatterproof and impact-resistant polycarbonate—which prevents any distortion in your eyeline.

On top of that, 100 Percent’s HiPER lenses filter out certain color wavelengths to create more contrast in your surroundings, making it easier to pick out obstacles in the snow—like rocks and roots, since the November snow was thin in Utah. I especially noticed how much clearer the details were in flat light, like when the sun went behind one side of the mountain and I was suddenly skiing in the shade. Plus, they’re anti-fog (I didn’t have any issues with my breath clouding up the lens, even when I tucked in my neck gaiter for warmth), and have a hydro and oleophobic coating to keep them smudge-, scratch-, and moisture-free.

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What we didn’t like

The price

There’s a lot of tech packed into the Norg, but $250 is still a lot for goggles. That said, all of its color options (there are seven available) do come with a low-light lens, so you’re essentially getting two interchangeable lenses for the price of one. If the price still seems prohibitive, the brand’s Snowcraft goggle rings up at $180, and their entry-level goggle, the Okan, is $110. Those models don’t have the same amount of features as the Norg, which is the brand’s flagship style, but you’ll still get superior visual quality and a comfortable fit.

How it compares

100 Percent isn’t the first to use a magnetic lens swapping system. The Anon M4 Toric is the fourth goggle from the brand’s magnetic lineup, which has graduated from six contact points to nine (plus, a facemask magnetically clips to the bottom of the goggles); but it’s even more expensive at $70 more than the Norg. Smith’s I/O Mag ChromaPop goggles start at $270 and use seven magnetic touchpoints instead of eight, while the brand’s $320 4D Mag also employs a magnetic system and opens up your field of view with a unique bend at the bottom of the lens. In terms of visual clarity, I haven’t experienced anything like the Norg outside of Oakley’s PRIZM technology; it feels like there is almost nothing on your face.

The bottom line

100 Percent’s Norg goggles may not be the first to offer easily interchangeable magnetic lenses, but they do it incredibly well—especially considering these are the first snow offerings from the brand. Not only is it easy to switch between lenses, but the frame is super comfortable (a major selling point for those skiing or boarding from first tracks to last chair) and oh so stylish. A true mesh of form and function.

But it’s the visual clarity that sets these apart from their competition—with no distortion due to the shape or color of the lens, they allow you to take in your surroundings on a whole other level.