Sri Lanka attack death toll rises to 290

5:12 a.m. ET, April 22, 2019

Photo shows family at Easter breakfast, just before the explosion

Television chef Shantha Mayadunne and her daughter Nisanga Mayadunne were killed in the explosion at the Shangri-La Hotel, Colombo, say two immediate family members.

In Facebook photo apparently posted just before the explosion, Nisanga showed herself and several others eating breakfast at the hotel. The photo caption read "Easter breakfast with family 😊"

Screen-capture of Nisanga's Facebook page, showing a photo posted from the hotel shortly before the attack.

Screen-capture of Nisanga's Facebook page, showing a photo posted from the hotel shortly before the attack.

Nisanga Mayadunne, pictured left, and Shantha Mayadunne, pictured right, in a photo posted to Nisanga's Facebook page.

Nisanga Mayadunne, pictured left, and Shantha Mayadunne, pictured right, in a photo posted to Nisanga's Facebook page.

3:21 a.m. ET, April 22, 2019

BREAKING: Death toll rises to 290

The number of people killed in Sri Lanka's church and hotel attacks has risen to 290, Superintendent of Police Ruwan Gunasekara told CNN, in a steep upward revision of earlier estimates. About 500 more are injured.

11:04 p.m. ET, April 21, 2019

Visual timeline: How the eight attacks unfolded

Sri Lankan hospital workers and Army soldiers stand at the door to a morgue following a blast in a church in Batticaloa. 

Sri Lankan hospital workers and Army soldiers stand at the door to a morgue following a blast in a church in Batticaloa. 

Here's a visual timeline of the attacks as they struck cities across Sri Lanka on Sunday, including targeting Easter services in three churches.

10:43 p.m. ET, April 21, 2019

Social media still blocked

Tourists and residents attempting to get in touch with relatives via social media on Monday were unable to do so without a Virtual Private Network (VPN) or a foreign SIM card, after the government ordered a block on social media in the aftermath of the attacks.

Attempts to load Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and the messaging app Viber all failed Monday morning. Twitter appears to be accessible and some government ministers have been tweeting out information.

Some Sri Lankans have been circumventing the blocks with VPNs. People using foreign SIM cards which roam onto non-Sri Lankan networks were unaffected.

10:30 p.m. ET, April 21, 2019

Two Turkish engineers named among the victims

Turkey has revealed the names of two Turkish citizens killed in the bombings.

"Unfortunately, we lost our citizens, Serhan Selcuk Narici and Yigit Ali Cavus, in the treacherous attacks in Sri Lanka," Turkish Foreign Minister Cavusoglu was quoted as saying in state media Anadolu Agency.

Both were engineers, the agency reported. 

“We are in contact with their families and we will ensure quick return of the bodies to our country," Cavusoglu said.

10:18 p.m. ET, April 21, 2019

New Zealand prime minister calls for 'the right to worship safely'

Little more than a month after a devastating attack on mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, the country's prime minister has a message of solidarity for Sri Lanka.

“New Zealand condemns all acts of terrorism, and our resolve has only been strengthened by the attack on our soil on the 15th of March. To see an attack in Sri Lanka while people were in churches and at hotels is devastating," said Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern in a statement.

“New Zealand rejects all forms of extremism and stands for freedom of religion and the right to worship safely."

10:12 p.m. ET, April 21, 2019

Eerily quiet during curfew

An overnight curfew imposed deathly quiet in capital city Colombo, before it was lifted on Monday morning. Driving through the streets from the airport, a CNN reporter saw only a handful of other cars on normally busy highways and roads. No pedestrians or other signs of street activity were visible.

The city’s beachfront hotel district, where several of the bombs struck Sunday, was heavily guarded. Soldiers carried automatic weapons and bomb-sniffing dogs inspected arriving guests, mostly international press.

Many other guests have left, or are preparing to leave—a bad sign for Sri Lanka’s resurgent tourism industry.