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Japan holds Shinzo Abe’s funeral

Ups and downs of Japan's longest-serving prime minister
02:44

What we covered here

  • The funeral of late former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe took place today in Tokyo, following his assassination last Friday in the city of Nara.
  • Crowds lined the streets of the capital to pay their respects as Abe’s body was driven by hearse to a funeral hall for cremation.
  • A police investigation into the shooting is ongoing. The suspect, Tetsuya Yamagami, was arrested at the scene but has not been formally charged.
  • Abe was Japan’s longest-serving prime minister before he stepped down in 2020 citing health reasons.
23 Posts

Our live coverage of the funeral of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has ended. Read more of our coverage here.

Shinzo Abe's body prepared for cremation, following private funeral

A hearse carrying the body of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, makes a brief visit to the Prime Minister's Office, as Japan's Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, officials and employees offer prayers, in Tokyo, Japan, on July 12.

The body of former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe will be cremated at Tokyo’s Kirigaya Funeral Hall, following a private funeral on Tuesday.

The hearse carrying Abe’s body traveled through the streets of the Japanese capital, passing by a number of significant buildings including the Prime Minister’s office and the Parliament building.

Huge crowds have lined the streets to catch a glimpse of the hearse carrying the body of the slain former leader. Many were seen waving and raising their arms in the air as the vehicle drove past, while others bowed their heads in respect.

Abe’s widow, Akie Abe, was seen traveling in the front seat of the hearse.

Abe's hearse has reached the Prime Minister's office as staff wait to say goodbye

Crowds gather in Tokyo following the funeral of former prime minister Shinzo Abe on Tuesday.

The hearse carrying Shinzo Abe’s body has reached the Prime Minister’s office in Tokyo, according to a live televised broadcast. 

The hearse was received by members of the Japanese government including Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, and Abe’s brother and Defense Minister Nobuo Kishi. They were seen bowing at the hearse at it arrived, along with the procession of black cars.

Abe’s widow, Akie Abe, greeted the mourners with nods from the front seat of the hearse. 

Shinzo Abe's widow, Akie Abe, seen traveling in the front seat of hearse

Akie Abe was seen traveling in the front seat of the hearse carrying her husband's body, following his funeral on Tuesday.

Akie Abe, the widow of former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe, was seen traveling in the front seat of the hearse carrying his body, following his funeral on Tuesday.

Akie Abe was seen bowing to the crowd as they paid their respects, while carrying an ancestral tablet, a symbol of transition to the afterlife.

Shinzo Abe’s funeral was held at Tokyo’s Zojoji Temple, with family and people who were close to the former prime minister in attendance, Japan’s public broadcaster NHK reported.

The hearse carrying Shinzo Abe’s body will travel from the temple to the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation, passing by a number of significant buildings including the Prime Minister’s office and the Parliament building.

Crowds swell on the streets, with people bowing and waving to the hearse carrying Abe's body

Crowds gather in Tokyo on Tuesday for the funeral of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

A long procession of black cars is driving past huge crowds gathered outside Tokyo’s Zojoji Temple as the hearse carrying Abe’s body makes its way to a funeral hall for cremation.

As the cars drive by, crowds — numbering in the hundreds — wave, clap and take photos. Many turned out to pay their respects to the former Prime Minister, a popular but controversial figure.

Some of the people along the street can be seen bowing to the passing hearse, some holding Buddhist beads and other objects of tribute.

The procession will pass by a number of significant buildings, including the Prime Minister’s office where staff will stand outside to see Abe off, before arriving at the funeral hall.

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Body of former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe leaves Tokyo's Zojoji Temple

A vehicle carrying the body of the late former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, leaves after his funeral at Zojoji Temple in Tokyo, Japan, on July 12.

The body of former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe has left Tokyo’s Zojoji Temple, following a private funeral service hosted by Abe’s widow, Akie Abe.

The hearse carrying Abe’s body will travel from the temple to the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation, passing by a number of significant buildings including the Prime Minister’s office and the Parliament building.

Mourners have been lining the streets outside the temple, bringing flowers, notes and green tea — symbols of help in the afterlife — to pay their respects to Abe.

Lining the sidewalk, a large crowd has gathered hoping to catch a glimpse of the hearse carrying the body of the slain former leader. Many were seen waving and raising their arms in the air as the vehicle drove past, while others bowed their heads in respect.

Attendance at the funeral was limited to family members and people who were close to the former prime minister, Japan’s public broadcaster NHK reported.

Media throng the streets outside Japan's parliament, waiting for hearse carrying Abe

Media stand outside Japan's parliament building on Tuesday.

Reporters and photographers — and a few dozen members of the public — thronged the streets alongside Japan’s parliament building on Tuesday as they waited for the hearse carrying the body of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to pass by.

As a sign of respect in Japanese culture, the body of a prominent figure will often be driven past areas and buildings with which they were heavily associated.

The hearse will leave Zojoji Temple after Abe’s funeral service, passing the former leader’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) headquarters, the Prime Minister’s office, and the Parliament building, before arriving at the Kirigaya Funeral Hall.

A few members of the public, some dressed in black, are at the scene hoping to catch a final glimpse of their former leader.

Naomi Aoki, a mourner in Tokyo, brought Buddhist beads as she waited for the hearse to pass by on July 12.

Naomi Aoki, an LDP supporter from Tokyo, said she was waiting outside the Parliament building today, hoping for a chance to say farewell. 

“For me, he was the most respected politician in Japan, I want to say the last farewell and I was off work today. He has left a great impact on my life,” Aoki said.
“I don’t think his death will be for nothing. People all over the world will feel the impact of what he achieved in his life.”

In photos: Crowds mourn Shinzo Abe outside Zojoji Temple

Crowds of mourners have gathered in Tokyo today, lining the streets around Zojoji Temple where the funeral service of late former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is taking place.

The funeral is private, limited only to the former leader’s family, close ones, and foreign dignitaries — but members of the public poured into the area to pay their respects.

Photos from the scene show mourners crying, hands clutching flowers, notes, and other offerings to place at the memorial outside the temple.

Abe was a controversial but popular figure, having served two terms in office from 2006 to 2007 and 2012 to 2020.

The temple is a centuries-old structure with historic and cultural significance, housing the tombs of Japan’s military rulers from the Edo period.

A private wake for Abe was also held at the temple on Monday night, attended by his widow, Akie Abe, other relatives and guests.

After the funeral service, the hearse carrying Abe’s body will be taken from the temple to the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation.

On the way, the hearse will pass by significant sites including the Prime Minister’s office, the Parliament building and Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party headquarters. At the Prime Minister’s office compound, office staff will stand outside to see him off.

Shinzo Abe will be remembered for his grand "Abenomics" experiment, professor says

Seijiro Takeshita, Professor, Management and Information, University of Shizuoka.

Japan’s former prime minister Shinzo Abe “did so much,” which is why he was the country’s longest-serving leader, a professor from the University of Shizuoka said Tuesday.

Abe came to office at a time when Japan was “suffering a strong Yen” and “exporters were struggling,” said Seijiro Takeshita, professor of management and information. He set about rebooting the economy, by launching a grand experiment popularly known as “Abenomics,” Takeshita said.

“Certainly, he has made a very positive progress, including trying to get more women into the workplace,” Takeshita said.
“He did so much, otherwise he wouldn’t be the longest reigning prime minister in our history.”

What was Abenomics?: Abe’s eponymous economic strategy included three so-called arrows — massive monetary stimulus, increased government spending, and structural reforms.

Abe’s allies praised the policy for reviving Japan’s economy and boosting consumer and investor confidence. But after a strong start, it faltered and in 2015 Abe fired “three new arrows” designed to boost gross domestic product. Any hopes they might eventually hit their mark were dashed when Covid-19 swept through the country in 2020, tipping Japan into recession.

Shinzo Abe will be remembered for his "breadth of vision," author says

Tobias Harris, senior fellow for Asia at the Center for American Progress and author of "The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan."

The most striking thing about former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe was the “breadth of his vision,” the author of a book about the country’s longest-serving prime minister said Tuesday.

Abe’s “willingness, determination to think … beyond the current generation,” made him a unique leader, said Tobias Harris, author of “The Iconoclast: Shinzo Abe and the New Japan.”

Abe was a prominent figure on the world stage. He cultivated strong ties with the United States — Japan’s major post World War II ally — and attempted to build a personal relationship with former US President Donald Trump, traveling to New York to meet the then-newly elected Republican President while former President Barack Obama was still in office.

“The US and Japan have been allies for a very long time but what you saw under Abe was almost taking the bilateral relationship to another level,” said Harris, a senior fellow for Asia at the Center for American Progress.
“There was a recognition that Japan had no alternative but to find a way to ensure the US was committed to Japan’s security, but also to the security and prosperity of the region.”

Hundreds queue to leave flowers in Nara near site where Shinzo Abe was assassinated

Hundreds of people braved the rains on Tuesday to leave flowers and notes of condolences in Nara, Japan, near the site where former Japanese prime minister Shinzo Abe was assassinated.

In an outpouring of grief, people have formed long queues on the streets in the central Japanese city to pay their respects to Abe, according to CNN staff on the ground. Some wiped away tears as they commemorated the former leader.

Abe was gunned down in broad daylight during a campaign speech on Friday. Japan, a country with one of the lowest rates of gun violence, is reeling from the shock killing, which has reverberated around the world.

Abe’s funeral is being held at Tokyo’s Zojoji Temple by Abe’s widow, Akie Abe, with attendance limited to family members and people who were close to the former prime minister, Japan’s public broadcaster NHK reported.

Shinzo Abe's funeral is underway, with mourners lining the streets outside Zojoji Temple

People stream to the Zojoji Temple for Shinzo Abe's funeral on Tuesday.

The funeral service for former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is now underway, four days after his assassination last Friday.

The private ceremony, taking place at the Zojoji Temple in Tokyo, is open only to family members, foreign dignitaries and people close to the former leader.

But people from all walks of life have flocked to the streets surrounding the temple to pay their respects, with mourners bringing flowers, notes and other offerings.

People CNN spoke with said they had been shocked by Abe’s daylight shooting on Friday.

The killing was particularly shocking given Japan has one of the world’s lowest rates of gun crime, and is widely regarded as one of the safest countries.

Abe’s legacy: Abe was a hugely popular but controversial figure throughout his two terms in office, from 2006 to 2007 and again from 2012 to 2020. Some of his most significant actions included boosting defense spending and pushing through a dramatic shift in Japanese military policy, allowing the country’s armed forces to engage in overseas combat — with conditions — for the first time since World War II.

Abe's funeral is being held at a centuries old temple housing the tombs of ancient military rulers

People gather to offer prayers at Zojoji Temple on Monday, July 11, in Tokyo where former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s body was taken for a wake on Monday evening.

Shinzo Abe’s funeral service takes place today at the Zojoji Temple in Tokyo — a historic landmark founded in the Kanto region more than 600 years ago and relocated to the capital, standing at its present site since 1598, according to the temple’s official website.

The Buddhist temple, located near Tokyo Tower, once functioned as the family temple of the Tokugawa Shogunate during the Edo period — the military government that unified the country and ruled Japan for more than 200 years.

It’s a culturally and historically significant site that houses the tombs of six of the Tokugawa shogun, or military rulers, and their wives and children.

The funeral on Tuesday will be hosted by Shinzo Abe’s widow, Akie Abe, with attendance limited to family members and people who were close to the former prime minister, Japan’s public broadcaster NHK reported.

After the service, the hearse carrying Abe’s body will travel from the temple to the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation, passing by a number of significant buildings including the Prime Minister’s office and the Parliament building, according to CNN affiliate TV Asahi. 

Shinzo Abe was the "face of Japan," international relations expert says

Former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe was “the nation brand face of Japan,” an international relations expert said Tuesday.

Abe’s funeral takes place today in Tokyo, following his assassination last Friday in the city of Nara.

“I cannot imagine a Japan without him,” Nancy Snow, a former Abe Fellow and Fulbright Scholar in Japan, told CNN.
“When I found out about his mortal injury and subsequent demise, my heart sank,” she said. “For someone in international relations, even though I can be critical of some of his policies, you have to appreciate so much of what he did to put Japan back up on the world stage.”

Abe served two separate terms as Japanese leader for the right-leaning Liberal Democratic Party — the first from 2006 to 2007, then again from 2012 until 2020. His second stint was the longest consecutive term for a Japanese head of government.

He will be remembered for boosting defense spending and pushing through the most dramatic shift in Japanese military policy in 70 years.

Cars arrive for funeral of former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe

Cars carrying guests are arriving at Tokyo’s Zojoji Temple for the funeral of the late former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Attendance at the funeral is limited to family members and people who were close to the former leader, Japan’s public broadcaster NHK reported. It is being hosted by Abe’s widow, Akie Abe.

Outside the temple, people of all ages and all walks of life have gathered to pay their respects to Abe. Many have brought flowers, notes and green tea — symbols of help in the afterlife — in an outpouring of grief.

After the service, the hearse carrying Abe’s body will travel from the temple to the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation, passing by a number of significant buildings including the Prime Minister’s office and the Parliament building, according to CNN affiliate TV Asahi. 

Streets of Tokyo are somber for Abe's funeral

People line up to offer flowers and prayers for former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, at Zojoji Temple prior to his funeral Tuesday, July 12, in Tokyo.

Mourners are lining the streets outside Tokyo’s Zojoji Temple for the funeral of late former Japanese leader Shinzo Abe, four days after he was brutally gunned down in broad daylight.

In an outpouring of grief, people of all ages and all walks of life have arrived to pay their respects to Abe, as Japan reels from the shock of his assassination.

The mood outside the temple is somber, as well wishers bring flowers, notes and green tea— symbols of help in the after life — to pay their respects to Abe, Japan’s longest-serving prime minister.

After the funeral, Abe’s body will be carried by hearse through the streets of Tokyo, passing by the former leader’s Liberal Democratic Party headquarters, the Prime Minister’s Office, and the Parliament building, before arriving at the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation, according to CNN affiliate TV Asahi.

Abe's body will travel from Tokyo's Zojoji Temple to a funeral hall for cremation after today's service

The hearse carrying the body of assassinated former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will be transported from Zojoji Temple in Tokyo to the Kirigaya Funeral Hall for cremation later today, according to CNN affiliate TV Asahi. 

The hearse will leave the temple after his funeral service, passing by Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party headquarters, the Prime Minister’s Office, and the Parliament building, before arriving at the funeral hall, TV Asahi reported.

The hearse will drive through the Prime Minister’s Office compound, where office staff will stand outside to see Abe off, the Prime Minister’s office said.

Taiwan's vice president makes "personal visit" to Japan for Shinzo Abe's funeral

Taiwan’s Vice President William Lai arrives in Tokyo on Monday.

Taiwan’s Vice President William Lai arrived in Tokyo on Monday on a “personal visit” for late former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s funeral, according to the Japan-Taiwan Exchange Association, Japan’s de facto embassy to Taiwan.

Lai’s previously unannounced trip makes him the highest-ranking Taiwanese official to visit Japan in 50 years since the severance of diplomatic relations in 1972 between Japan and the Republic of China — Taiwan’s official name.

China has consistently protested against foreign officials’ visits to Taiwan or countries allowing Taiwan’s senior government officials to visit or transit, as it claims the self-ruled democratic island as its own territory, despite the Communist Party never having ruled over it.  

Taipei has downplayed the visit by Lai.

“Vice President William Lai has been a long-time friend to PM Abe and his family. The Vice President is deeply saddened by the passing of PM Abe and is grateful for his distinguished contribution to relations between Taiwan and Japan,” Taiwan’s presidential spokesperson Kolas Yotaka told CNN. 

In a statement, Taiwan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it had no further information or comment on Lai’s “personal schedule,” adding that senior government officials, including President Tsai Ing-wen, Premier Su Tseng-chang and foreign minister Joseph Wu, had paid their respects to Abe at Japan’s de facto embassy in Taipei on Monday morning.

In a statement to CNN, Japan’s Foreign Ministry said Lai would attend Abe’s funeral “in private” during a “personal visit.” 

Akie Abe, widow of assassinated leader Shinzo Abe, set a new mold for Japanese first ladies

Akie Abe, the wife of the assassinated former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, in Osaka, Japan, in 2019.

When Akie Matsuzaki married Shinzo Abe, then a rising political aide, in 1987, she followed a path well trodden by Japanese wives and gave up her job at the country’s largest advertising agency.

But over more than three decades of marriage — including nine years as Japan’s first lady — she proved to be anything but a conventional political wife.

In Japan, Akie Abe is best known for her outspoken and progressive views. Unlike her predecessors, she refused to stay in the shadow of her husband. Instead, the socialite carved out a public role for herself in a style more akin to American first ladies.

Her support for progressive causes, freewheeling ways and cheerful confidence endeared her to the Japanese public. Among Japanese media, Akie Abe earned a nickname — Shinzo Abe’s “domestic opposition party.”

With a penchant for speaking her mind, she openly challenged a raft of her husband’s policies, from his push for nuclear power to the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. In 2016, she met protesters in Okinawa who opposed expansion of a United States Marine Corps base, which Shinzo Abe supported.

Her progressive views sometimes appeared to be at odds with more conservative values.

Akie Abe has been a vocal advocate for LGBTQ rights, joining a gay pride parade in Tokyo in 2014. She also supports the use of medical marijuana, having posed for photos in a sprawling cannabis field in 2015.

The funeral and wake: Akie Abe, 60, was widowed on Friday after the former Japanese Prime Minister was fatally shot in broad daylight while delivering a speech in the city of Nara, in an assassination that has shocked and angered the nation.

On Friday, she took an hours-long train journey to rush to her husband’s side in a Nara hospital. The next day, she brought his body back home to Tokyo by car. On Monday, she mourned alongside relatives and guests at a private wake at the Zojoji Temple.

Through it all, Akie Abe has remained outwardly composed and quiet when appearing in public.

On Tuesday, she will host a private funeral, to be followed by larger ceremonies at a later date.

Read a full profile of Akie Abe here.

In photos: Shock and grief as world reacts to Abe's assassination

People gather at Tokyo's Zojoji Temple a night before the funeral of former Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Messages of grief and remembrance have flooded in from all corners of the globe after the assassination of Shinzo Abe, from members of the public to world leaders and politicians who worked with the former Prime Minister during his two terms in office.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken at Yokota Air Base, Japan on Monday.

United States Secretary of State Antony Blinken visited Tokyo on Monday, meeting Prime Minister Fumio Kishida to pay respects and give his condolences to the Japanese people.

“I’m here because the United States and Japan are more than allies; we are friends. And when one friend is hurting, the other friend shows up,” Blinken told reporters on Monday.

The Sydney Opera House is lit up in the colors of the Japanese flag on July 10.

In Australia, the iconic Sydney Opera House lit up in the colors of the Japanese flag on Sunday in honor of Abe.

People pray at a makeshift memorial in Nara, Japan on July 10)

In Japan, people have gathered and placed flowers at a makeshift memorial in Nara, near the location where Abe was fatally shot on Friday. He had been in the city delivering a campaign speech in support of candidates from his Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) when the shooting happened.

The Indian flag flies at half-staff at the presidential palace in New Delhi on Saturday)

In New Delhi, the Indian flag flew at half-staff at the presidential palace to pay tribute to Abe. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who first met Abe in 2007 and called him a “dear friend,” declared Saturday a day of national mourning after the assassination.

See the full photo gallery here.

Japan went to the polls 2 days after the shooting

Japan’s ruling coalition swept to victory on Sunday in an upper house election that took on heightened significance following the assassination of former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Abe, 67, was shot on Friday in the city of Nara while delivering a speech in support of candidates from his Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) in a killing that has stunned a nation with one of the world’s lowest rates of gun crime.

The country’s leaders had urged the public to turn out and vote on Sunday, denouncing the killing as an attack on democracy.

On Sunday, days ahead of Abe’s wake and funeral, the conservative LDP won at least 63 seats, more than half of the 125 seats up for grabs, according to the country’s public broadcaster NHK.

Vote counting is now complete, but official results have not yet been released by Japan’s Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications.

Why this matters: While the upper house is the less powerful of the Japanese parliament’s two chambers, the victory solidifies Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s political base, and could help him push ahead with key policy issues including possibly revising Japan’s pacifist constitution — a cause Abe had championed during his nearly nine years in power and one that would require a two-thirds majority vote of both houses of parliament, followed by a popular referendum.

A few hours after polls closed on Sunday, Kishida told NHK, “The election has been at stake because of violence but we have to complete it. Now we’ve completed it, it’s quite meaningful — moving forward, we have to continue to work hard to protect democracy.”

Read more here.

The police investigation into Shinzo Abe's assassination is ongoing

Police in Japan are continuing to investigate Shinzo Abe’s assassination following the arrest of suspect Tetsuya Yamagami at the scene moments after the fatal shooting last Friday.

Police say Yamagami, 41, is suspected of murder but has not been formally charged.

Yamagami said he held a grudge against a certain group, to which he believed Abe had ties, and which his mother had been involved with, according to Japan’s public broadcaster NHK and Kyodo News Agency, citing police.

Nara police said Monday that Yamagami may have carried out a test shooting in the early hours of Thursday morning against the building of “a certain group” in Nara prefecture, using the homemade gun he later killed Abe with.

Investigators said a vehicle believed to be Yamagami’s car was seen on security cameras close to where Thursday’s test shooting reportedly took place. Police refused to name the group, and the security footage has not been made public.

CNN has not been able to independently confirm what group the suspect was referring to.

The suspect’s mother was a member of the Family Federation for World Peace and Unification, widely known as the Unification Church, said Tomihiro Tanaka, the church’s Japan office chairman, in a statement on Monday.

The suspect was never a member of the church, while his mother has been a member who attended church events about once a month, the statement said. Tanaka added that the organization will cooperate with investigators if asked to do so.

Homemade weapon: Yamagami told police he watched YouTube videos to help him make his weapons, NHK reported Monday, citing investigators. He practiced shooting the weapons in the mountains days before the killing, and police found wooden boards with bullet holes in the suspect’s vehicle, according to NHK.

Photos from the scene on Friday show what appeared to be a weapon with two cylindrical metal barrels wrapped in black tape.

Yamagami also told investigators he had initially intended to kill Abe by using explosives at an event in Okayama prefecture, a three-hour drive from Nara, NHK reported — but he reportedly changed his plan due to potential difficulties in entering the event.

As a national leader, Abe was affiliated with multiple groups, organizations and causes, as is common in any democracy. It is unclear if Abe was linked to any group the suspect was talking about.

When asked whether the suspect was working alone or with anyone else, police said they are investigating all possibilities.

Japan mourns Shinzo Abe with a private wake, public memorial and funeral

Shinzo Abe’s assassination has shocked Japan, a country long regarded as one of the world’s safest.

The funeral for the former prime minister on Tuesday will be hosted by Abe’s widow, Akie Abe, at a temple in Tokyo. Attendance is limited to family members and people who were close to the former prime minister, Japan’s public broadcaster NHK reported.

A private wake was held in Tokyo on Monday, according to Abe’s office.

The office has set up an altar for the public to lay flowers in the western city of Yamaguchi, and will also add a space for incense, it said.

In the days since Abe’s death, mourners in Nara gathered and placed flowers at a makeshift memorial close to where he was gunned down.

International reaction: There has been widespread shock that a former prime minister who had defined politics for a generation could be shot dead on the street at close range.

Presidents, prime ministers and other international leaders have sent tributes expressing outrage and sadness over the killing.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken visited Tokyo on Monday, meeting Prime Minister Fumio Kishida to pay respects and give his condolences to the Japanese people.

“I’m here because the United States and Japan are more than allies; we are friends. And when one friend is hurting, the other friend shows up,” Blinken told reporters on Monday.