Hong Kong protest sees hundreds of thousands call for city's leader to step down

11:35 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Nearly 2 million protesters in Hong Kong, organizers claim

Close to 2 million people descended on Hong Kong's streets on Sunday, Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), the organizers of the protests, estimate.

According to CHRF, those numbers are unprecedented. Police estimated that the 338,000 people followed the protest's original route.

In a statement released by the group Sunday night, CHRF said demonstrations will continue until the government withdraws the extradition bill in its entirety, releases arrested protesters and withdraws all charges, retracts the characterization of the protests as a "riot" and forces Chief Executive Carrie Lam to resign.

"Should the government refuse to respond, only more Hong Kongers will strike tomorrow," CHRF said.

A slow shutter image shows thousands of people taking part in protests in Hong Kong on Sunday.
A slow shutter image shows thousands of people taking part in protests in Hong Kong on Sunday.

11:34 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Pro-democracy protest leader to be released from jail

Joshua Wong, the young leader of Hong Kong’s 2014 “Umbrella” movement, will be released from prison on Monday, according to his pro-democracy political party Demosisto.

The news broke amid historic demonstrations against a China extradition bill Sunday night.

Wong, who spent much of 2017 in prison for his role in the protests and was sent back last month for contempt of court, has called for the scrapping of government proposals aimed at easing extradition of wanted suspects to mainland China.

Joshua Wong speaks to tens of thousands protesters outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong, in September 2012.
Joshua Wong speaks to tens of thousands protesters outside the government headquarters in Hong Kong, in September 2012.

In an opinion piece penned for Time magazine earlier this week, Wong said that Hong Kong’s extradition law would be a “victory for authoritarianism everywhere” and urged the United States to act.

“As American security and business interests are also jeopardized by possible extradition arrangements with China, I believe the time is ripe for Washington to re-evaluate the U.S.–Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which governs relations between the two places. I also urge Congress to consider the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act. The rest of the international community should make similar efforts,” Wong wrote.

11:02 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Drone footage shows sea of protesters in Hong Kong

11:22 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Do You Hear The People Sing?

“Do You Hear The People Sing?,” a song from musical Les Misérables and the anthem of Hong Kong protests in 2014, has resurfaced in demonstrations over the controversial China extradition bill.

A large group of demonstrators belted out the song in unison under a footbridge next to the police headquarters Sunday afternoon in Hong Kong. Crowds circling the singers cheered: "Encore!" 

The rousing chorus: “Do you hear the people sing?/Singing the songs of angry men?/It is the music of the people/Who will not be slaves again!” is sung in the musical as students prepare to launch an anti-monarchist rebellion in the streets of Paris.

In recent years it has been picked up as the soundtrack for demonstrations from Ukraine to the US.

9:59 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong leader admits government "deficiencies" had disappointed the people

Faced with yet another huge protest over her handling of the China extradition bill, Hong Kong's leader Carrie Lam issued a rare apology Sunday night. 

Hours after the demonstrations started, the government said in a statement that Lam had admitted "deficiencies" in the government's work had led to "substantial controversies and disputes in society, causing disappointment and grief among the people."

Full statement from a government spokesman:

Over the past two Sundays, a large number of people have expressed their views during public processions. The Government understands that these views have been made out of love and care for Hong Kong. 
The Chief Executive clearly heard the views expressed in a peaceful and rational manner. She acknowledged that this embodied the spirit of Hong Kong as a civilised, free, open and pluralistic society that values mutual respect, harmony and diversity. The Government also respects and treasures these core values of Hong Kong. 
Having regard to the strong and different views in society, the Government has suspended the legislative amendment exercise at the full Legislative Council with a view to restoring calmness in society as soon as possible and avoiding any injuries to any persons. The Government reiterated that there is no timetable for restarting the process. 
The Chief Executive admitted that the deficiencies in the Government's work had led to substantial controversies and disputes in society, causing disappointment and grief among the people. The Chief Executive apologised to the people of Hong Kong for this and pledged to adopt a most sincere and humble attitude to accept criticisms and make improvements in serving the public. 
9:57 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong protesters reoccupy the street they were thrown off just days ago

Large numbers of young protesters have regrouped on the same street they were expelled from by police just days earlier, with tear gas and rubber bullets.

Sitting peacefully on Harcourt Road, black-clad protesters said they were considering staying for hours or even overnight on the usually busy street.

Protesters begin to sit down on Harcourt Court next to the Legislative Council on Sunday.
Protesters begin to sit down on Harcourt Court next to the Legislative Council on Sunday. CNN/James Griffiths

Harcourt Road runs through the middle of Hong Kong's affluent Admiralty district, alongside the city's Legislative Council building. It was one of the main sites of 2014's Occupy protests.

The mood Sunday was completely different to earlier in the week, with a tiny almost invisible police presence and relaxed crowd, almost none of whom were wearing face coverings or helmets and other safety gear.

Outside the central government offices a large crowd called for Carrie Lam to resign but even there the mood was far less hostile than Wednesday and no one was obviously equipped for renewed skirmishes with police.

While the mood could change, Hong Kongers appear to have not only come out in great numbers, but shown they can do so completely peacefully.

Protesters being physically expelled from Harcourt Road by police on Wednesday using tear gas and riot gear.
Protesters being physically expelled from Harcourt Road by police on Wednesday using tear gas and riot gear. CNN/Julia Hollingsworth

9:30 a.m. ET, June 16, 2019

Hong Kong protester who fell to his death remembered

Near the glitzy Pacific Place mall, piles of white flowers have been left stacked beside the road and on the concrete divider in memory of a protester who died on Saturday morning.

While demonstrators were encouraged to wear black on Sunday, many also pinned white flowers to their chests in his memory.

In the early hours of Saturday morning, while holding banners opposing the China extradition bill, the man fell from a podium in Hong Kong's Admiralty district.

CNN/Helen Regan
CNN/Helen Regan

He was rushed to hospital but died soon after, Hong Kong police said. Many of the exact circumstances that led to his death still remained unclear Sunday night.

But protesters were clearly prepared to honor his memory.

A second memorial was set up near the Legislative Council offices on Harcourt Road on Sunday, complete with the yellow raincoat which became a symbol of Wednesday's protests.

"He sacrificed a lot for us," 16-year-old school student Athena told CNN.

CNN/James Griffiths
CNN/James Griffiths