January 27 coronavirus news

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12:29 p.m. ET, January 27, 2020

First Beijing death confirmed as overall toll hits 82

From CNN’s Steven Jiang in Beijing

Visitors tour the grounds of the Temple of Heaven, which remained open during the Chinese New Year and Spring Festival holiday on January 27 in Beijing, China.
Visitors tour the grounds of the Temple of Heaven, which remained open during the Chinese New Year and Spring Festival holiday on January 27 in Beijing, China. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

One person in Beijing has died from the new coronavirus, Beijing’s municipal health authority announced Monday, the first virus-related death in the Chinese capital. 

The patient was a 50-year-old man who traveled to Wuhan on January 8 and started to have a fever a week later upon returning to Beijing.

He sought medical attention on January 21 and was confirmed to be infected with the virus the next day. His condition deteriorated Monday, when he died of respiratory failure.

The southern island province of Hainan also reported its first virus-related death; an 80-year-old woman from Wuhan.

This brings the total death toll from the coronavirus to 82.

11:09 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Ivory Coast tests first person in Africa for coronavirus

By CNN's By Radina Gigova and Bukola Adebayo

Health authorities in Ivory Coast are investigating a suspected case of Wuhan coronavirus in a female student who arrived from China, officials have said.

The student, whom authorities have not named, is the first person to be tested for the virus on the continent. It has killed at least 80 people in mainland China.

The 34-year-old student traveled from Beijing to the Félix-Houphouët-Boigny International Airport in Abidjan on Saturday and was coughing, sneezing and experienced difficulty breathing, Ivory Coast's Ministry of Health and Public Hygiene said in statement.

The student was moved to a safe location upon arrival at the airport and is currently under medical observation, the ministry said.

Read more here:

10:58 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Fear and anxiety in epicenter of Wuhan coronavirus outbreak

China is restricting the travel of around 60 million people as the coronavirus death toll rises to at least 80, with more than 2,700 confirmed cases worldwide.

CNN’s David Culver traveled to Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, and scrambled to flee the city before authorities placed the city of 11 million on lockdown.

Here's what he found:

12:01 p.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Saudi Arabia downplays impact of virus on oil markets

From CNN’s Nic Robertson and Mick Krever in London

Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah Al-Saud (l), Minister of Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia attends the G20 Foreign Ministers' Meeting on November 23, 2019.
Prince Faisal bin Farhan bin Abdullah Al-Saud (l), Minister of Foreign Affairs of Saudi Arabia attends the G20 Foreign Ministers' Meeting on November 23, 2019. Bernd von Jutrczenka/picture alliance/Getty Images

Saudi Arabia’s foreign minister discussed the impact of the coronavirus on oil prices in an exclusive interview with CNN's Nic Robertson.

Faisal bin Farhan Al Saud said: “It is of course important to us, but for us more important is the human factor, and the assurance that there will be safety and security for the global health system. And we’re confident that that is being looked after.
“We’re in close contact with the Chinese government and it is obvious to us that they are working very hard to contain the outbreak," he added.
10:49 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

China's Ministry of Finance announce $8.7B fund to fight virus

From journalist Isaac Yee in Hong Kong 

Security personnel wearing protective clothing check the temperature of people using portable devices and an advanced thermo camera (L) at a subway station entrance in Beijing on January 27.
Security personnel wearing protective clothing check the temperature of people using portable devices and an advanced thermo camera (L) at a subway station entrance in Beijing on January 27. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

China’s Ministry of Finance and National Health Commission has allotted 60.33 billion yuan (US$8.7 billion) towards fighting the deadly coronavirus this year.

The money will be used to fund basic public health services and epidemic prevention, the ministry said in a statement Monday.

It added that there will be no “interception, seizure, misappropriation or change of the fund’s usage."

The number of confirmed novel coronavirus cases has now increased to over 2,700 across all but one province of mainland China. 

10:49 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Canada's first two cases of coronavirus are husband and wife 

From CNN's Paula Newton

Flight crews wearing masks arrive at the Toronto Pearson Airport in Toronto, Canada on January 26.
Flight crews wearing masks arrive at the Toronto Pearson Airport in Toronto, Canada on January 26. Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images

Ontario has confirmed its second case of coronavirus -- the wife of the man presumed to have Canada's first case.

Public Health Officer Dr. David Williams said the woman was in isolation at home, adding that the risk to Ontarians remains low.

A news conference will be held at 11.30 a.m. ET, he said in a statement.

9:21 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Why the new virus doesn't have a name yet

Masked patients walk out of the No. 3 Hospital in Yichang city in central China's Hubei province on Thursday, January 23.
Masked patients walk out of the No. 3 Hospital in Yichang city in central China's Hubei province on Thursday, January 23. Feature China/Barcroft Media/Getty Images

News about the coronavirus has dominated the headlines for days, as it has killed at least 80 people in China and spread across the globe.

Yet it still doesn't have an official name.

Although it has been widely referred to as the "Wuhan coronavirus," the virus is still formally known as "novel coronavirus" or "2019-nCoV," where the "n" stands for "novel", while the "CoV" denotes "coronavirus."

In the past, some viruses been named after the place or a region where they were first identified -- that was the case with MERS, which stands for Middle East respiratory syndrome, in 2012. Ebola virus was named after a river in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Lyme disease is named after a town in Connecticut.

However, in 2015, the WHO issued new guidance, urging scientists to avoid names that could cause unnecessary negative effects on nations, economies and people. It said:

Terms that should be avoided in disease names include geographic locations (e.g. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, Spanish Flu, Rift Valley fever), people’s names (e.g. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Chagas disease), species of animal or food (e.g. swine flu, bird flu, monkey pox), cultural, population, industry or occupational references (e.g. legionnaires), and terms that incite undue fear (e.g. unknown, fatal, epidemic).

The WHO said that a disease name should consist of generic descriptive terms, based on the symptoms, those who it affects, its severity or seasonality.

8:20 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Shanghai businesses and schools will remain shut long into February in attempts to contain virus

From journalist Isaac Yee in Hong Kong

Visitors stand outside a closed temple in Shanghai, China, on Saturday, January 25.
Visitors stand outside a closed temple in Shanghai, China, on Saturday, January 25. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Shanghai's government has ruled that all businesses in the city should remain shut until February 9, as it announced a series of new measures against the spread of the coronavirus.

Other moves include suspending schools until February 17, and implementing strengthened quarantine inspections for workers returning to Shanghai.

Only businesses the government deems vital to the operation of China's biggest city -- such as gas stations, pharmacies and supermarkets -- will be allowed to remain open, the municipal government said in a statement Monday.

It added that schools will be re-opened after an assessment on the epidemic.

This comes as the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Shanghai increased to 53, including one death.

8:08 a.m. ET, January 27, 2020

Are people infectious before they appear ill? Experts weigh in

From CNN's Sarah Dean in London

In this 2015 file photo, Dr. Yvonne Doyle speaks at City Hall in London.
In this 2015 file photo, Dr. Yvonne Doyle speaks at City Hall in London. Keith Larby/Alamy Live News

Chinese health officials said Sunday that the coronavirus can be spread before any symptoms appear, meaning carriers may not realize they are infected before they transmit the virus to others.

There's still lots we don't know about this outbreak, however, and according to Dr. Yvonne Doyle, medical director of Public Health England, "it isn’t confirmed that people are infectious before they appear to be ill."

"That's one of the things we have to learn," she added.

Here's an excerpt (lightly edited for clarity) of Dr. Doyle's interview with BBC Radio 4's Today Program on Monday:

Q: (We're) hearing from China that people can spread the virus without having any symptoms...

A: At the moment we don’t have confirmed evidence that that’s the case. It's reasonable of course to assume that could happen, but at the moment we don’t know that, because this is a novel virus.

Q: Do you think it is likely that we are going to see cases (in the UK)?

A: Yes I do... I think I would be surprised if there wasn’t. We are well prepared since we spotted this in the early new year. We have been working with increasing intensity with the NHS (National Health Service) to make sure we are well prepared, and we are. 

Q: (We're) also hearing Chinese officials are also developing a vaccine, will that be ready in time?

A: It won’t be ready in time at the moment. Vaccines take months, maybe years to develop.