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What the spring equinox means for you

By Forrest Brown

Published March 20, 2019

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The 2019 spring equinox occurs on Wednesday, March 20, and it's eagerly awaited around the globe.

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It means we get that glorious balance of daytime and nighttime all over the world, with just about 12 hours of each.

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For people in the Northern Hemisphere, it brings the promise of longer days, increasing warmth, and more time outdoors.

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For people in the Southern Hemisphere, it brings the relief of cooler autumn days.

From Tourism Victoria

This year's spring equinox has something special: The last supermoon of 2019. It's called the Full Worm Moon, and it will rise on the same day as the equinox.

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You have to go back to 1981 to find the full moon and the spring equinox occurring on the same date.

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During a supermoon, our orbital neighbor appears brighter and little larger than usual as it rises.

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For thousands of years, people have celebrated this time of rebirth. Cultures and countries around the world mark spring equinox with various holidays.

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Vernal Equinox Day

In Japan, the spring equinox is a national holiday. To celebrate, people will hold family reunions, visit shrines and seek out cherry blossoms and other natural wonders.

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Norwuz

Also known as Persian New Year, it's one of humanity's oldest celebrations, going back thousands of years. The United Nations says more than 300 million people celebrate Norwuz.

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Easter

It's no coincidence that Christians celebrate the resurrection during this time of rebirth. Easter is celebrated on the first Sunday after the full moon that follows the spring equinox.

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