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Everything you should know about Passover

Passover, also called Pesach, is the Jewish festival celebrating the exodus of the Israelites from Egyptian slavery in 1200s BC.

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As the story goes, Israelites marked their doorposts with lamb's blood to protect children from the tenth plague: the slaughter of the first born.

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With the protective mark, the destruction would “pass over” the house. Read the full story in chronological order in the Bible’s Old Testament book of Exodus.

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Sometimes, Passover is called the Festival of Unleavened Bread. The only bread eaten is made without yeast (matzo or matzah).

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There’s a ceremonial meal called the Seder. At the ceremony, foods of symbolic significance are eaten, and prayers and traditional recitations are performed.

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The youngest child present asks the four questions about why the Seder night is different from other nights. The answers tell the Passover story.

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Usually, a story about the flight of the Israelites from Egypt is read at the Seder from a book called the Haggadah.

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