us

Daylight saving time: Myths and truths

By CNN staff

Published March 8, 2019

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Loved by some, loathed by many, daylight saving time has wide-ranging and often surprising implications.

Here are the myths and truths.

CNN

MYTH

It saves energy

Patrick Hertzog/AFP/Getty Images

Nope. A US Department of Energy study found daylight saving (not "savings!") time reduces annual energy use by just 0.03%. Other studies actually found increases in energy consumption during DST.

Patrick Hertzog/AFP/Getty Images

TRUTH

You really DO feel cruddy for a few days afterward

Shutterstock

The clock changes can raise the risk of accidents by sleep-deprived motorists, according to a 1996 New England Journal of Medicine study.

Shutterstock

TRUTH

You're less likely to be robbed during daylight saving time

Shutterstock

In 2015, the Brookings Institution found that robbery rates for the first day of DST fall an average 7 percent, with a 27% drop during the evening hour that gained extra sunlight.

Shutterstock

MYTH

Farmers loved it

Shutterstock

Farmers actually fought proposals to implement daylight saving time. Their argument was that the changes cut productivity. One agricultural lobby argued to repeal it back in 1919.

Shutterstock

TRUTH

Fewer and fewer of us think it's worth the trouble

Shutterstock

Just 33% of surveyed American adults think daylight saving time is "worth the hassle," according to a 2014 Rasmussen poll.

Shutterstock