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Updated 5:12 AM ET, Fri April 22, 2022
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01 As Equals women fishing Zimbabwe01 As Equals women fishing Zimbabwe
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Brandina Mudimba looks on as the boat captain lists the remaining items required to repair their broken down fishing rig docked for months at Chilala Fishing Camp on 01 November 2021 in Binga district, Matabeleland North Province of Zimbabwe. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
An abandoned canoe on the banks of the Zambezi Rver near Simatelele village on 02 November 2021. Due to successive droughts the river has shrunk leading to some areas being decommissioned for fishing. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
Women of the cooperative make crafts to raise money to repair their fishing rig at Siachilaba centre on 04, November 2021. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
A fishing rig sails into the waters of Lake Kariba on 03 November 2021. Successive droughts have caused the kapenta fishing business to become less lucrative as there are too many rigs on the ever decreasing water body. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
Mercy Mwinde, a member of the women's fishing cooperative poses for a portrait in her grocery store at Siachilaba centre on 04, November 2021. Mwinde built and started the business with proceeds from the fishing project. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
Kapenta fish being dried on the shores of the Zambezi River on 03, November 2021. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
Brandina helping her daughter with homework after school at her homestead in Simatelele village on 02, November 2021. When the rig was working she could pay school fees and buy uniforms with less difficulties. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
Brandina and Lawrence sitting at their homestead in Simatelele village on 02, November 2021. Zinyange Auntony/CNN
Brandina Mudimba sits pondering about their broken down fishing rig docked for months at Chilala Fishing Camp on 01 November 2021. Zinyange Auntony/CNN