Supporters of President Donald Trump protest after storming the US Capitol on January 6, 2021.

There's nothing more frightening in America today than an angry White man

Updated 10:14 AM ET, Sun November 21, 2021

(CNN)The Brute. The Buck. And, of course, the Thug.

Those are just some of the names for a racial stereotype that has haunted the collective imagination of White America since the nation's inception.
The specter of the angry Black man has been evoked in politics and popular culture to convince White folks that a big, bad Black man is coming to get them and their daughters.
I've seen viral videos of innocent Black men losing their lives because of this stereotype. I've watched White people lock their car doors or clutch their purses when men who look like me approach. I've been racially profiled.
It's part of the psychological tax you pay for being a Black man in America -- learning to accept that you are seen by many as Public Enemy No. 1.
But as I've watched three separate trials about White male violence unfold across the US these past few weeks -- the Kyle Rittenhouse trial, the Ahmaud Arbery death trial and the civil case against organizers of the 2017 Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville -- I've come to a sobering conclusion:
There is nothing more frightening in America today than an angry White man.
Kyle Rittenhouse carries a rifle in  Kenosha, Wisconsin, on August 25, 2020, during a night of unrest following the police shooting of Jacob Blake. Rittenhouse shot three people, two fatally, that night but was acquitted this week after claiming self-defense.