Get to know farro and other superfood whole grains

Farro is the Italian name for three forms of ancient wheat: farro piccolo, or einkorn; farro medio, or emmer; and farro grande, or spelt (shown here).

(CNN)Quinoa has reached a level of superfood status not seen since the great kale takeover of the aughts. Equally embraced and mocked in pop culture, it's become the symbol of the grain bowl generation. It's not the only whole grain that's worth bringing to the table, however.

The world of whole grains is wide, and if quinoa and brown rice have been the only grains on your plate, it's time to expand your palate. Here's an introduction to whole grains, along with tips for cooking and enjoying them.

What's a whole grain?

    Amaranth is a tiny, gluten-free grain.
    The term "whole grains" encompasses all grains and seeds that are, well, whole. They retain all their edible parts: the fiber-rich outer bran layer; the carbohydrate-rich endosperm center, which makes up the bulk of the grain itself; and the inner core, or germ, which is packed with vitamins, protein and healthy fats.
      On other hand, refined grains such as white rice and all-purpose flour have been milled to remove the bran and germ, stripping away much of the fiber, protein and vitamins, and leaving only the starchy endosperm.
        "A lot of people don't realize that whole grains contain several grams of protein in addition to vitamins and antioxidants," said Nikita Kapur, a registered dietitian nutritionist in New York City. With every serving of whole grains, "you get a ton of minerals, B vitamins and fiber, which is especially important for gut health."
        So-called "ancient grains" fall under the umbrella of whole grains, though the phrase is more of a marketing term than a marker of a more nutritious option. Ancient grains refer to whole grains like millet, amaranth, kamut and, yes, quinoa that have been the staple foods of cultures for several hundred years. They are not hybridized or selectively bred varieties of grains, like most modern wheat, rice and corn.
          Kamut, shown here  with fresh vegetables, is the trademarked brand name for an ancient wheat called Khorasan.
          And though quinoa has gotten all the press as a whole grain superfood, there's good reason to try others. Trying a variety of whole grains isn't just a way to mix up your same-old side dish routine. It's also a chance to get a wider portfolio of minerals and more into your diet.
          "Suffice to say, we need to have a more diverse plant-based diet" to get the full complement of recommended nutrients in our meals, Kapur said, "and we can't get it from the same 10 or 20 foods.
          "One grain might have more manganese, another more zinc or magnesium, and another more protein," she added. "Try one as a pasta, one as a porridge -- you do you, as long as there's a variety."
          Familiar foods like oats, corn, brown and other colors of rice, as well as wild rice (which is an aquatic grass), are all considered whole grains, but there are many others you'll want to add to your regular repertoire.

          Some whole grains to get to know

          This sweet millet porridge is made with raisins and dried cranberries.
          Amaranth is a tiny gluten-free grain that can be simmered until soft for a creamy polenta-like dish, but it also makes a deliciously crunchy addition to homemade energy bars or yogurt bowls when it's been toasted. To toast amaranth seeds, cook over medium heat in a dry pan, shaking frequently until they begin to pop like minuscule popcorn kernels.
          Buckwheat is gl