Taliban fighters try to stop the advance of female protesters marching through Kabul, Afghanistan, on Wednesday, September 8. It was a day after the Taliban announced an all-male interim government with no representation for women or ethnic minority groups.
Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/Shutterstock

In pictures: Afghanistan in crisis after Taliban takeover

Updated 11:35 AM ET, Thu September 9, 2021

Taliban fighters try to stop the advance of female protesters marching through Kabul, Afghanistan, on Wednesday, September 8. It was a day after the Taliban announced an all-male interim government with no representation for women or ethnic minority groups.
Marcus Yam/Los Angeles Times/Shutterstock

The Taliban have retaken control of Afghanistan nearly two decades after they were driven out of its capital by US troops.

The Taliban's resurgence coincides with the withdrawal of US troops, which US President Joe Biden first announced in April and completed at the end of August.

Militants entered the presidential palace in Kabul hours after former President Ashraf Ghani fled the country on August 15. In the week prior, many of Afghanistan's major cities fell to the insurgent group with little to no resistance.

The rapid fall of Afghanistan's national forces and government came as a shock to Biden and senior members of his administration.

On the day after the Taliban's takeover, hundreds of people poured onto the tarmac at Kabul's international airport, desperately seeking a route out of Afghanistan. Some have managed to evacuate the city; others continue to try. On August 26, a bomb attack killed 13 US service members and at least 170 others outside the airport.

Afghans now await reports of what kind of regime they will live under. If Taliban rule is anything like it was in the 1990s, it would mean a deterioration in civil liberties, particularly for women and girls whose freedoms grew under the civilian government.

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