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The robots that are running our warehouses

Updated 4:06 AM ET, Mon May 24, 2021
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Robots are an increasingly familiar presence in warehouses. At the south-east London warehouse run by British online supermarket Ocado, 3,000 robots fulfill shopping orders. When an order is sent to the warehouse, the bots spring to life and head towards the container they require. Scroll through to see more robots that are revolutionizing warehouses. Courtesy Ocado
In response to the coronavirus pandemic, MIT collaborated with Ava Robotics and the Greater Boston Food Bank to design a robot that can use UV light to sanitize the floor of a 4,000-square foot warehouse in just 30 minutes. Alyssa Pierson/CSAIL
Seven-foot "Model-T" robots produced by Japanese startup Telexistence have been stacking shelves in two of Tokyo's largest convenience store franchises. Featuring cameras, microphones and sensors, the Model-T uses three "fingers" to stock items such as bottled drinks, cans and rice bowls. The robot is controlled by shop staff remotely. Telexistence
US company Boston Dynamics has become known for its advanced work robots. "Handle" is made for the warehouse and equipped with an on-board vision system. It can lift boxes weighing over 30 pounds. Boston Dynamics
Stretch is the latest robot from Boston Dynamics and can work in warehouses and distribution centers. Designed to keep human workers out of harm's way, Stretch's tentacle-like grippers mean it can manipulate boxes. Boston Dynamics
Although not specifically designed for warehouses, Boston Dynamics' dog-like robot "Spot" can lift objects, pick itself up after a fall, open and walk through doors, and even remind people to practice social distancing. Boston Dynamics
This robot is used to plant seeds and check plants at the "Nordic Harvest" vertical farm based in Taastrup, Denmark. The indoor farm is one of the biggest in Europe. Thibault Savary/AFP/Getty Images
Robots sort packages at a warehouse run by JD.com -- one of China's largest e-commerce firms, in Wuhan, China, ahead of the annual Singles Day online shopping bonanza, in 2019. Wang He/Getty Images