New data shows many Black Americans remain hesitant to get Covid-19 vaccine

Syringes wand vials of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine are prepared to be administered to front-line health care workers under an emergency use authorization at a drive up vaccination site from Renown Health in Reno, Nevada on December 17, 2020. (Photo by Patrick T. Fallon / AFP) (Photo by PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images)

(CNN)More than half of Black adults in the US remain hesitant to get the Covid-19 vaccine and experts say new data underscores the need to prioritize equitable access and redouble efforts to build trust within communities.

Respondents said they either don't plan to get the shot or they are uncertain if they should or will get the shot, according to a new survey released Thursday by the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases.
The survey found that only 49% of Black adults plan to get the vaccine with 19% of those people saying say they will get it right away and 31% preferring to wait.
    Conversely, 31% of Black adults say they will not get the vaccine and 20% say they are unsure.
      The findings come as data from many states reveal that White people are getting vaccinated at an average of twice the rate of Black people.
        More than 20 states now report Covid-19 vaccination data by race or ethnicity, and inequities in Covid-19 vaccination are present in all of them, according to a Kaiser Family Foundation analysis.
        Black people have received a smaller share of vaccinations than their share of Covid-19 cases in all 23 reporting that data, and the same is true for Hispanic people in all 21 states reporting that data, the analysis found.