Thanksgiving looked a little different this year. Here's how people adapted across the country

The Kingsley family celebrates the Thanksgiving meal from three homes via videoconference.

(CNN)Janet Fonesca typically enjoys Thanksgiving dinner at her parents' home in Corpus Christi, Texas, with her three sisters, their spouses, her brother, 10 children, aunts, uncles, cousins -- all under one roof.

With the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommending that Americans opt out of traveling this Thanksgiving because of the Covid-19 pandemic, many were forced to find alternative ways to still celebrate the holiday.
For Fonesca, that meant a socially distanced dinner table set with just three plates.
    Fonesca, a patient care tech in a hospital Covid-19 ICU, had already made significant changes to her lifestyle. She, her husband and daughter, who is asthmatic, sleep in separate rooms; use separate bathrooms, disposable cutlery and dishes; and sit 6 feet apart to try to keep everyone healthy.
    Janet Fonesca and her family on Thanksgiving enjoy a socially distanced meal together.
    So, changing holiday plans wasn't a huge departure.
    Fonesca started off Thanksgiving Day at Mass with 50 people -- all masked -- in attendance. And although she couldn't gather with family to eat and play Mexican Bingo, she made sure to swing by her in-laws' home to see them and their 90-year-old parents from a safe distance.
    Janet Fonesca visits with her family.
    "I'm grateful to be healthy but sad for all my friends who have lost their loved ones," she said.

    Swapping side dishes in the driveway

    Paul Kingsley's family loves to cook. So, when his daughter asked what the plans were this year, it didn't take long to come up with a solution that included every family member.
    Typically, Kingsley's home in Rochester, New York, is the meeting point for Thanksgiving, but a couple weeks ago, the family shifted gears to make the holiday a safe one, he said.