WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 13: Supreme Court justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies on the second day of her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Hart Senate Office Building on October 13, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September. (Photo by Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images)
Tom Williams/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 13: Supreme Court justice nominee Amy Coney Barrett testifies on the second day of her Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Hart Senate Office Building on October 13, 2020 in Washington, DC. Barrett was nominated by President Donald Trump to fill the vacancy left by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who passed away in September. (Photo by Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:18
Watch Amy Coney Barrett's answers on key legal issues
US President Donald Trump speaks during a "Make America Great Again" rally at the Eastern Kentucky University, in Richmond, Kentucky, on October 13, 2018. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP)        (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
US President Donald Trump speaks during a "Make America Great Again" rally at the Eastern Kentucky University, in Richmond, Kentucky, on October 13, 2018. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm / AFP) (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
04:19
Haberman: This underscored for Trump that he's not president
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 29: Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson talked about a large variety of topics including dropping testosterone levels, increasing rates of suicide, unemployment, drug addiction and social hierarchy at the summit, which had the theme 'The Case for the American Experiment.'  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 29: Fox News host Tucker Carlson discusses 'Populism and the Right' during the National Review Institute's Ideas Summit at the Mandarin Oriental Hotel March 29, 2019 in Washington, DC. Carlson talked about a large variety of topics including dropping testosterone levels, increasing rates of suicide, unemployment, drug addiction and social hierarchy at the summit, which had the theme 'The Case for the American Experiment.' (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:48
Carlson promotes conspiracy that FBI planned Capitol riot
CNN
Now playing
02:55
Abrams says she is open to Manchin's voting rights legislation
CNN
Now playing
01:56
Toobin: Huge victory for Obamacare, but fight isn't over
Split Fanone Clyde
CNN/Pool
Split Fanone Clyde
Now playing
04:26
DC officer Fanone recalls interaction with GOP Rep.: He ran away 'like a coward'
President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, arrive to meet at the 'Villa la Grange', Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Patrick Semansky/AP
President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin, arrive to meet at the 'Villa la Grange', Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Now playing
02:58
Biden and Putin hold first face-to-face meetings
Now playing
03:40
Arizona voting data taken to so-called 'lab' in remote Montana
President Joe Biden speaks to the news media following a news conference after meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Patrick Semansky/AP
President Joe Biden speaks to the news media following a news conference after meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Wednesday, June 16, 2021, in Geneva, Switzerland.
Now playing
03:45
Biden apologizes for firing back at CNN's Kaitlan Collins after question
CNN
Now playing
11:01
Keilar and Berman: Vote shows GOP cares about police ... until they don't
weisselberg
JB Miller/Trump Organization
weisselberg
Now playing
01:43
NYT: Trump finance chief could face charges as early as this summer
Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election.
Samuel Corum/Getty Images
Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC. Trump supporters gathered in the nation's capital today to protest the ratification of President-elect Joe Biden's Electoral College victory over President Trump in the 2020 election.
Now playing
03:35
Avlon: There's a lot we still don't know about Jan. 6
Getty Images
Now playing
03:25
See top Trump DOJ official's two-word response to election probe request
US President Joe Biden gives a press conference after the NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, on June 14, 2021.
OLIVIER HOSLET/AFP/POOL/Getty Images
US President Joe Biden gives a press conference after the NATO summit at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) headquarters in Brussels, on June 14, 2021.
Now playing
01:25
Biden calls on foreign leaders to protect against 'phony populism'
CNN
Now playing
01:39
Honig: Emails show Trump had his enablers
Senate TV
Now playing
05:54
McConnell dismisses Trump DOJ's secret seizure of data
CNN —  

Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett declined to preview how she would rule on potential cases as she faced questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, seeking to portray herself as an independent judge without an agenda.

“I’ve made no commitment to anyone, not in this Senate, not over at the White House, about how I would decide any case,” said Barrett.

Barrett, who would replace the late liberal Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, said Tuesday that she shared the same judicial philosophy as the late conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, who she clerked for in the 1990s and pioneered the practice of adhering to legal text and the original intentions of those who drafted the Constitution. But she made clear to distinguish herself from her mentor.

“I want to be careful to say that if I’m confirmed, you would not be getting Justice Scalia, you would be getting Justice Barrett,” she said.

Here are some takeaways from the first day of questioning.

Barrett declined to preview her views on abortion and Roe v. Wade

Barrett repeatedly declined to give her views on high-profile, contentious issues like abortion rights and the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. She was repeatedly asked about her views of Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark case establishing a constitutional right to abortion, and Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which reaffirmed its central holding in 1992.

“I don’t have any agenda,” said Barrett. “I have no agenda to try to overrule Casey. I have an agenda to stick to the rule of law and decide cases as they come.”

04:37 - Source: CNN
Senator repeatedly presses Amy Coney Barrett on Roe v. Wade

“I will obey all the rules of stare decisis,” she later added, referring to the principle of adhering to past cases.

After posing a series of questions on the Supreme Court’s abortion rulings, Sen. Dianne Feinstein of California, the panel’s top Democrat, said it was “distressing not to get a straight answer” from Barrett.

Says she’s ‘not hostile’ to Obamacare, but doesn’t elaborate on upcoming case

Barrett also rejected Democratic senators’ questions on the Affordable Care Act, citing Ginsburg’s response to answering hypothetical questions during her hearing in 1993. “No hints, no previews, no forecasts,” said Barrett.

Democrats, however, were undeterred, repeatedly raising the upcoming case and warning the law is in danger. Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin put up a chart showing state by state how many Americans would lose their insurance if the court terminated the 2010 health care law after it hears a case on November 10.

Chief Justice John Roberts and the court has twice ruled to uphold the law. But Republicans in Congress have since stripped out the individual insurance mandate, a component that Roberts deemed a tax that was crucial to the law’s constitutionality. In 2017, Barrett wrote that he had “pushed the Affordable Care Act beyond its plausible meaning to save the statute.”

Barrett acknowledged on Tuesday that she did “critique” Roberts’ reasoning, but attempted to assure Democrats by saying that the court’s upcoming case concerns a different legal doctrine known as severability, or whether the entire law can stand if one part of it is deemed illegal, even though the Trump administration is seeking to strike down the entire law.

“I am not hostile to the ACA,” she said.

“I am not here on a mission to destroy the Affordable Care Act,” Barrett added later on. “I’m just here to apply the law and adhere to the rule of law.”

Iowa Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley directly asked Barrett if she had committed to the President “or anyone else” that she would vote to take down the Affordable Care Act if confirmed to the court.

“Absolutely not,” she responded. “I was never asked, and if I had been, that would have been a short conversation.”

01:04 - Source: CNN
'No notes!' Bash weighs in on moment that drew laughter

Republicans push back against Democrats on Obamacare

Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham used his opening statement to defend the Republicans’ opposition to Obamacare, a day after Democrats highlighted their constituents’ reliance on the law for their health insurance.

“If it were up to me, bureaucrats would not be administering health care from Washington, people in South Carolina would be running health care,” said Graham, who is running for reelection in a close race. “The difference between analyzing a lawsuit and having a political argument is fundamentally different.”

Grassley said that Democrats “misrepresent or claim to know” Barrett’s views on the constitutionality of the 2010 health care law, but are “peddling” a “total fiction” while “painting” Barrett as “heartless” and “on a mission to scrap the health care law.”

“Frankly, that’s absurd,” said Grassley.