WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 22: (AFP OUT) Ivanka Trump participates during  the American Leadership in Emerging Technology Event in the East Room of the White House June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
Olivier Douliery/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 22: (AFP OUT) Ivanka Trump participates during the American Leadership in Emerging Technology Event in the East Room of the White House June 22, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:39
Ivanka Trump's role at the White House (2018)
Now playing
01:57
Chuck Hagel criticizes Trump's statement on Afghanistan
gun laws shootings Comer pamela brown nr vpx _00015627.png
CNN
gun laws shootings Comer pamela brown nr vpx _00015627.png
Now playing
02:23
'I can't answer that': Kentucky lawmaker responds to CNN on gun policy
Now playing
02:39
National security adviser: Russia will face consequences if Navalny dies in prison
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) speaks during a press conference outside the U.S. Capitol on February 5, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House voted 230 to 199 on Friday evening to remove Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from committee assignments over her remarks about QAnon and other conspiracy theories.
Now playing
03:20
Marjorie Taylor Greene lashes out at media after backlash over controversial caucus
AP
Now playing
03:16
Maxine Waters: Jim Jordan is a bully and I shut him down
US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.
NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images
US Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene, Republican of Georgia, leaves her office on Capitol Hill on February 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
03:51
Marjorie Taylor Greene launching 'America First' caucus
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Russia at the White House in Washington, DC on April 15, 2021. - The United States announced sanctions and the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats Thursday in retaliation for what Washington says is the Kremlin's US election interference, a massive cyberattack and other hostile activity.
JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images
US President Joe Biden delivers remarks on Russia at the White House in Washington, DC on April 15, 2021. - The United States announced sanctions and the expulsion of 10 Russian diplomats Thursday in retaliation for what Washington says is the Kremlin's US election interference, a massive cyberattack and other hostile activity.
Now playing
02:22
White House backtracks on refugees decision after criticism
Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Andrew Harnik/Pool/Getty Images
Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on April 14, 2021 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
02:44
'National embarrassment': Biden reacts to mass shootings
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - APRIL 15:  Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to talks to Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during a meeting with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov in the Kremlin on April 15, 2013 in in Moscow, Russia. Karimov is on a state visit to Russia. (Photo by Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images)
Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images
MOSCOW, RUSSIA - APRIL 15: Russian President Vladimir Putin (L) talks to talks to Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov during a meeting with Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov in the Kremlin on April 15, 2013 in in Moscow, Russia. Karimov is on a state visit to Russia. (Photo by Sasha Mordovets/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
Russia to expel 10 US diplomats in 'tit-for-tat response' to Biden sanctions
Now playing
03:10
Avlon: Here's what we know 100 days since the Capitol riot
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on October 22, 2018. - US national security advisor John Bolton is in Moscow holding meetings with senior Russian officials following Washington's weekend announcement of withdrawal from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as the INF. (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP)        (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)
Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on October 22, 2018. - US national security advisor John Bolton is in Moscow holding meetings with senior Russian officials following Washington's weekend announcement of withdrawal from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as the INF. (Photo by Mladen ANTONOV / AFP) (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:17
Political scientist: US-Russia relations are in the toilet
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 13: Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D-NM) speaks during a news conference on immigration to condemn the Trump Administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, outside the US Capitol on June 13, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Toya Sarno Jordan/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:39
Governor settles with former campaign staffer who accused her of sexual mistreatment
pool/cnn
Now playing
01:56
Hear what Dr. Gupta said when Cruz went maskless before
Now playing
02:30
Biden's decision to withdraw from Afghanistan is personal for this lawmaker
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Andrew Harnik/AP
President Joe Biden speaks from the Treaty Room in the White House on Wednesday, April 14, 2021, about the withdrawal of the remainder of U.S. troops from Afghanistan.=
Now playing
02:10
Why Biden made his Afghanistan announcement in this particular room
(CNN) —  

Ivanka Trump has combined her role as presidential adviser with that of in-demand campaign asset and fundraiser. Much like her father President Donald Trump, Ivanka Trump is of late mingling her two jobs, using trips that highlight her policy portfolio to deliver campaign messaging in strategically selected battleground states.

One-part West Wing senior staff and one-part pop culture celebrity, Trump is the second-most requested campaign surrogate for events, behind her father, according to a White House official. She brings in money, too. Since August, she has participated in just four fundraisers on behalf of the campaign that have netted upwards of $15 million, according to the official.

Trump will be ramping up her travel even more as the election nears.

“She will be doing at least two to four days per week of visiting various states,” the official said. In the last two weeks, she has visited Arizona, North Carolina, Michigan, Florida, Pennsylvania, Minnesota and Georgia. The official noted that next week, Trump will be back in Florida and North Carolina, where polls show a close race between the President and Democrat nominee Joe Biden.

Million-dollar draw

Perhaps Ivanka Trump’s biggest calling card this election season is her ability to pull in dollars.

In August, after a virtual fundraiser from the White House held on Zoom and headlined by the first daughter netted $4 million, Republican Party Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel touted the impact of her appearance, saying, “Ivanka is a tremendous voice for the re-election effort.”

“The fact is, she’s talking about issues at these events that other surrogates are not. She can talk about paid family leave, or workforce development, or the child tax credit – issues that a lot of voters frankly haven’t heard Republicans talk about as much this campaign,” said the official, who said the people who go to Ivanka Trump events tend to be more ideologically diverse than those who turn out for the energy of the President’s larger rallies.

“When you’re raking in that kind of cash, you’re speaking to a very select cross-section of donor,” said a campaign source of her core audience. Earlier this month, at a closed-press fundraiser in Austin, Texas, Trump raised $4.5 million for Trump Victory, the fundraising arm of the Republican National Committee and the Trump campaign. In Tampa, she raised $3 million at a private event. A campaign source said that in 2016, Trump was averaging about $2 million per campaign fundraising event; this year, that number has climbed to $3.5 million.

’In high demand’ with her own style

On Friday, Trump was at a Winona, Minnesota, technology plant, discussing the administration’s employment agenda, while also touting the President’s USMCA trade deal and underscoring his message about keeping jobs in the US. The day before, Trump joined Vice President Mike Pence, this time at an Eau Claire manufacturing company that produces building materials. Trump, a former executive at the family real estate outfit, told the assembled workers how impressed she was with the company’s products. “And I’ve seen a lot of laminates,” she added. Trump and Pence also appeared at a “Cops for Trump” event in Minneapolis, playing up the President’s “law and order” messaging, which has become a cornerstone of his campaign stump speeches.

“She’s in high-demand,” the White House official said. “When she’s out there, she doesn’t have to fit in one box. She’s talking about policy that she’s had a hand in, but she’s also saying Trump needs to stay another four years.” On a recent visit to Tampa, prior to a “fireside chat” with local business leaders to discuss small businesses, Trump rolled up her sleeves in front of television cameras at a mom-and-pop bakery to prep dough for Cuban bread, a loaf of which she took home. It was a photo-op moment aimed at drawing Hispanic voters just days after Biden visited the same area.

Not a hype-man like her older brother, Donald Trump Jr., whose campaign appearances are typically raucous and primarily serve to rally Trump supporters, Ivanka Trump is deployed more strategically, according to the campaign source. “Ivanka is the Trump who can actually talk about issues and policy, not just rant against Joe Biden or fan the flames of hyper-partisanship,” the source said. “Where Don is calling out memes and fueling the base, she is having a conversation with voters who might be on the fence, or voters who didn’t go with Trump the first time around. This isn’t about her mingling her White House credentials with the hard-core MAGA types.”

Trump is also not a standing member of the Women for Trump club, which includes headliners like Trump Jr.’s girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle, and Eric Trump’s wife, Lara, both of whom are senior advisers to the Trump 2020 campaign, as well as former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, Diamond and Silk and campaign senior adviser Mercedes Schlapp. Second lady Karen Pence is also a loyal campaign soldier, on Friday making solo appearances in Michigan to rally evangelicals and female voters. Trump, however, is mostly a lone wolf on her scheduled campaign stops, though she does make exceptions for Pence and other members of the Cabinet.

Trump is also conscious of campaigning limitations during a pandemic, the White House official noted. Where Trump Jr. has not been an avid mask-wearer in public, nor abided by indoor gathering restrictions for some events – even after Guilfoyle’s bout with Covid-19 this summer – Ivanka Trump for her recent appearances has typically worn a mask and has hosted larger gatherings outside.