Unpopular teens could be at higher risk of heart conditions later in life, study suggests

Thirteen-year-olds who weren't very popular with their peers growing up seem to have a higher risk of developing circulatory system disease in later life, a study released Tuesday has found.

(CNN)Many of us hope to escape who we were in high school -- particularly if you were last in line to be picked in gym class -- but a growing body of research suggests that how popular you are in adolescence has a link with psychological and physical health decades later.

Thirteen-year-olds who weren't very popular with their peers growing up, a new study released Tuesday has found, seem to have a heightened risk of developing circulatory system disease in later life. This includes higher risk for conditions such as narrowed and hardened arteries and abnormal heartbeat that affect the normal functioning of the heart and blood vessels.
"Although not many realize it, peer status is one of the strongest predictors of later psychological and health outcomes, even decades later, said Mitch Prinstein, the John Van Seters distinguished professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of North Carolina.
"Several early studies revealed that our likeability among peers in grade school predicts life outcomes more strongly than does IQ, parental income, school grades, and pre-existing physical illness," Prinstein, who wasn't involved with the research, said.
    Prinstein, and the authors of the study, said that it's important to note that peer status is a specific form of popularity -- likeability rather than being the cool kid.
    "Many would perhaps think of high-status kids as those who were highly visible and influential -- hanging out in the smoking area during breaks and partying during the weekends. That is another type of popularity, which is sometimes referred to as perceived popularity," said Ylva Almquist, an associate professor and senior lecturer at the department of public health sciences at Stockholm University and an author of the study, which published in the journal BMJ Open.
    "Peer status is rather an indicator of likability, and the degree to which a child is accepted and respected by their peers."
    Chronic health problems are usually explained by genetic factors or actions like smoking, drinking or an unhealthy diet, but research has suggested that high-quality relationships are a key indicator of mortality.

    Observational study

    In this study from Sweden, the researchers used data from the Stockholm Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study, which includes everyone born in 1953 and residing in Stockholm, the Swedish capital, in 1963.
    The health of 5,410 men and 5,990 women was tracked into their 60s. At age 13, they had been asked who among their classmates they preferred to work with. They used the results to determine "peer group status," which they divided into four categories: zero nominations, which they termed "marginalized"; one ("low status"); two or three ("medium status"); and four or more ("high status").
    Thirty-three percent of the boys enjoyed high peer group status at the age of 13, slightly more than girls (28.5%), the researchers found. Some 16% of the girls were classed as "marginalized," compared to 12% of boys.
    Circulatory disease was more common among the men than it was among the women, but the children classed as "marginalized" at age 13 had a 33% to 34% higher risk of circulatory disease in adulthood in both sexes, the study found.
    In their analysis, the researchers said they accounted for factors such as number and position of siblings, parental education and mental health, socioeconomic conditions, and school factors, such as intellect, academic performance and any criminal behavior.
    But as an observational study, it can only show a link, and Almquist said there could be many explanations for the association.
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