She's on the frontline of a rape epidemic. The pandemic has made her work more dangerous

Updated 5:12 AM ET, Tue June 23, 2020

CNN is committed to covering gender inequality wherever it occurs in the world. This story is part of As Equals, an ongoing series.

Lagos, Nigeria -- At the start of each day, Dr. Anita Kemi DaSilva-Ibru and her team put on gloves, facemasks and other personal protective equipment to see their patients.
They're not treating people for Covid-19, but they are on the frontline of the pandemic, working at the Women at Risk International Foundation (WARIF), a rape crisis center in Lagos, Nigeria.
Wearing protective gear is the new reality for crisis center workers, like DaSilva-Ibru.
"We change these kits each time we see a survivor as we are mindful of the risk of transmission of the virus between the survivor and us and the cross-contamination between a survivor and the next," she told CNN.
US-trained gynecologist DaSilva-Ibru has spent most of her career treating hundreds of sexual violence victims but it was the growing scale of the crisis in Nigeria that prompted her to set up WARIF in 2016.
The clinic in Yaba, a suburb of Lagos, provides medical treatment, legal assistance therapy and space for rape victims and survivors of sexual abuse to get back on their feet.
One in four Nigerian girls has been the victim of sexual violence, according to UN estimates but DaSilva-Ibru says the numbers are higher as many cases go unreported due to the stigma attached.
In recent weeks, two high profile cases of gender-based violence have brought Nigerian women out onto the streets demanding change.
Uwaila Vera Omozuwa, a 22-year-old microbiology student, was found half-naked in a pool of blood in a local church where she had gone to study after the Covid-19 lockdown left universities across the country shut.