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CNN —  

It seems like you can’t be on the internet without seeing people talking about — or influencers modeling — blue-light glasses. The glasses often promise to block blue light from laptops, phones and most other digital screens, but do they really work? And why do we need to block blue light anyway?

Market Study Report, a market research company, estimates the global market for blue-light eyewear will increase to $29 million by 2024, up from $18 million in 2019. The supposed benefits of the glasses include reduced eye strain and better sleep.

However, according to Dr. Raj Maturi, ophthalmologist and clinical spokesman for the American Academy of Ophthalmology, just one of those claims is technically true. “Since there is no scientific evidence to suggest blue light from our screens are damaging our eyes, the American Academy of Ophthalmology does not recommend blue-light blocking computer glasses,” he says.

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Rather than blue-light blocking glasses, the Academy offers various tips for reducing digital eyestrain to help with discomfort.

Though there’s no scientific proof the glasses can ease your eyestrain, they may actually help you sleep. As Maturi explains, “There is some evidence that blue light from screens may affect the body’s circadian rhythm, our natural wake and sleep cycle. Since blue light wakes us up and stimulates us, too much blue light exposure late at night from phones, tablets or computer screens can disrupt our ability to fall asleep.” And in these days when more of us are having sleep problems, these could potentially help.

There’s also some evidence that blue light may contribute to premature skin aging, and who wants that hitting the delicate skin around your eyes?

Ahead, you’ll find blue-light glasses in super chic styles, starting at just $9, many of which have customer reviews saying that they did actually help reviewers’ eyes feel better after reading or looking at the computer all day. Given that many of us will be working from home for a while, what better time to try them?

LifeArt Blue Light Blocking Glasses ($17.95, originally $33.90; amazon.com)

LifeArt Blue Light Blocking Glasses
LifeArt Blue Light Blocking Glasses

With more than 3,000 reviews, these blue-light blocking glasses come in pretty much every silhouette you can think of, from classic square-edge tortoiseshell to a round black and white option.

Quay Hardwire ($55; quayaustralia.com)

Quay Hardwire
Quay Hardwire

You’ll have them saying you’re “pretty in pink” when you rock these frames.

Warby Parker Haskell (starting at $95; warbyparker.com)

Warby Parker Haskell
Warby Parker Haskell

You can get blue-light lenses added to any Warby frame, with or without a prescription, for just $50. We personally love these clear green lenses, which fit on most face shapes.

Warby Parker Butler (starting at $95; warbyparker.com)

Warby Parker Butler
Warby Parker Butler

Just check out the unique coloring on these specs, which are also available in a gorgeous deep blue.

Sojos Retro Round Blue Light Blocking Glasses ($20.68, originally $21.68; amazon.com)

Sojos Retro Round Blue Light Blocking Glasses
Sojos Retro Round Blue Light Blocking Glasses

These adorable retro-inspired glasses have a tough wire frame and arms, and come in colors like black, tortoiseshell and clear pink.

Quay X Chrissy All Nighter ($55; quayaustralia.com)

Quay X Chrissy All Nighter
Quay X Chrissy All Nighter

These chic frames come in Chrissy Teigen-inspired colorways, if you’re feeling super sassy.

AOSM Blue Light Blocking Glasses, 2 Pack ($19.98, originally $25.99; amazon.com)

AOSM Blue Light Blocking Glasses, 2 Pack
AOSM Blue Light Blocking Glasses, 2 Pack

Get two pairs of glasses — one black and one tortoiseshell — for a super low price.

Quay Prove It ($65; quayaustralia.com)

Quay Prove It
Quay Prove It

A “must have” writes one reviewer, saying these specs are “Sturdy, sexy and comfortable. My favorite blue light glasses thus far!”

J.Crew Round Blue Light Glasses ($17.50, originally $29.50; jcrew.com)

J.Crew Round Blue Light Glasses
J.Crew Round Blue Light Glasses

Get a classic look for less with these tortoiseshell-pattern specs from J.Crew.

Blutech So Whimsical ($60.99; aclens.com)

Blutech So Whimsical
Blutech So Whimsical

These tortoise and blue glasses are cute and practical, with protection against artificial light without color distortion.

Evolutioneyes E-Specs ($14.99; aclens.com)

Evolutioneyes E-Specs
Evolutioneyes E-Specs

These simple reading glasses get the job done for a low price, with one reviewer writing, “I needed a few pair of computer readers to wear every day, and these are perfect.”

Knockaround Custom Premiums ($25; knockaround.com)

Knockaround Custom Premiums
Knockaround Custom Premiums

These are bestsellers for a simple reason — you design the look yourself. Pick frame and arm colors and you’re ready to go.

Intense ($49; eyebuydirect.com)

Intense
Intense

Steal that Clark Kent look with these specs that over 300 reviewers have rated 5 stars. Now through May 31, you can use the code BLUE40 to get 40% off your order of blue light glasses.

VisionGlobal Blue Light Blocking Glasses for Women ($18.95; amazon.com)

VisionGlobal Blue Light Blocking Glasses for Women
VisionGlobal Blue Light Blocking Glasses for Women

These well-priced glasses come in 13 colorways, including some lovely pastels to help brighten up your days.

St Michel Square Rose Gold Eyeglasses ($51; eyebuydirect.com)

St Michel Square Rose Gold Eyeglasses
St Michel Square Rose Gold Eyeglasses

These metal frames scream intimidatingly cool bookworm, and don’t forget about that BLUE40 promo code to get 40% off.

Quay Scrollin ($55; quayaustralia.com)

Quay Scrollin
Quay Scrollin

These adorably named glasses have a 4.6-star rating from fans. One raves, “I love these glasses! I don’t have tired eyes or headaches due to blue light exposure anymore.”

Quay Lustworthy ($65; quayaustralia.com)

Quay Lustworthy
Quay Lustworthy

Give vintage librarian vibes with these cat eye specs that users rate 4.6 stars.

Note: The prices above reflect the retailers’ listed prices at the time of publication.