New York City students protest to keep schools open on November 14. Mayor Bill de Blasio made the decision to close down the city's public school buildings starting on November 19, after the city's 7-day average reached the 3% positive-testing-rate threshold.
Steve Sanchez/Sipa USA/Reuters

How the pandemic has changed education

Updated 2:05 PM ET, Mon November 23, 2020

New York City students protest to keep schools open on November 14. Mayor Bill de Blasio made the decision to close down the city's public school buildings starting on November 19, after the city's 7-day average reached the 3% positive-testing-rate threshold.
Steve Sanchez/Sipa USA/Reuters

Because of the novel coronavirus, many schools around the world had to shut down earlier this year.

According to UNESCO, nearly 1.3 billion students were stuck at home after their school year was suddenly interrupted.

Students began trying to navigate distance learning. With little notice, teachers switched to virtual classrooms. Parents took on new roles as homeschooling became the norm.

Some schools have reopened. Many of those who are attending school in-person have new procedures to follow. Students are social distancing and donning protective gear. They may even have to pass temperature checks in order to stay and learn. Custodians are working around the clock to sanitize desks and classrooms.

Many students at home are struggling with access to the food and technology they previously received at school. Some schools have stepped up to fill the gap the best they can, providing drive-thru food pickup services and equipment to access the internet from home.

Students have missed major milestones such as prom and graduation. They're unable to participate in extracurricular activities like dance, music or sports. For those who do still get to enjoy these events and activities, it's not the same.