Her husband died. Then his family shaved her head and made her strip beside his grave

Updated 6:11 AM ET, Fri March 27, 2020

CNN is committed to covering gender inequality wherever it occurs in the world. This story is part of As Equals, an ongoing series.

Lagos, Nigeria — For many years, Rose's clothing store was the destination of choice for Lagos women in search of a new outfit for a party or occasion.
She traveled regularly to textile hubs in Turkey to source high-quality fabrics for her clients and her children helped out in the family business on busy days during December festivities.
The small store in Oshodi -- in the heart of the bustling Nigerian city -- did a booming trade until personal tragedy struck the businesswoman in 2015.
Doctors diagnosed Rose's husband with chronic kidney failure that eventually led to his death two years later at the age of 55.
The illness -- in a country where 4% of the 195-million strong population have access to health insurance -- drained the family's finances.
"I sold everything in my shop, undervalue, to get money for his weekly dialysis," Rose, 45, told CNN.
But the financial challenge she faced while caring for her sick husband was dwarfed, she says, by what she encountered after his death in 2017.
Following his burial in southern Nigeria, Rose says she was forced by her in-laws to undergo a series of rituals that included shaving her head, pubic hair, and stripping near her husband's grave.
When she initially refused, Rose says they told her that she and her children would be banished from the local community in Delta State, where her husband was to be buried.
"I never wanted to go through that process, but when I asked them what if I don't do it, they said it [her refusal] means I killed my hu