Now playing
03:28
A tale of two minimum wages
Pharmacy student Jason Rodriguez prepares Pfizer vaccines at the Christine E. Lynn Rehabilitation Center in Miami, Florida on April 15, 2021. - Jackson Health System launched a Covid-19 vaccination initiative with colleges and universities in Miami-Dade County, which include Barry University, Florida International University, Florida Memorial University, Miami Dade College and University of Miami. Through this partnership, students who are Florida residents, as well as out-of-state and international students, will be allowed to sign up for a COVID vaccine appointment via our online portal. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images
Pharmacy student Jason Rodriguez prepares Pfizer vaccines at the Christine E. Lynn Rehabilitation Center in Miami, Florida on April 15, 2021. - Jackson Health System launched a Covid-19 vaccination initiative with colleges and universities in Miami-Dade County, which include Barry University, Florida International University, Florida Memorial University, Miami Dade College and University of Miami. Through this partnership, students who are Florida residents, as well as out-of-state and international students, will be allowed to sign up for a COVID vaccine appointment via our online portal. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:55
Covid-19 vaccine demand may soon reach a tipping point
Now playing
04:03
Taliban threatens to kill Afghans who worked for US during war
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) speaks to reporters as she arrives for the continuation of the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The next phase of the trial, in which senators will be allowed to ask written questions, will extend into tomorrow. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) speaks to reporters as she arrives for the continuation of the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on January 29, 2020 in Washington, DC. The next phase of the trial, in which senators will be allowed to ask written questions, will extend into tomorrow. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Now playing
04:08
Murkowski explains why she's voting for Biden nominee
pool
Now playing
04:20
Watch as judge reads out verdict in Chauvin trial
News 12 Long Island
Now playing
02:45
1 dead and 2 wounded in shooting at Long Island Stop & Shop
CNN
Now playing
01:33
Gupta on Covid-19: It doesn't seem to transmit well on surfaces
Now playing
05:01
'Did I strike a nerve?': Val Demings takes on Jim Jordan
NBC/Today Show
Now playing
02:27
'To a certain extent, nativist': Bush criticizes current GOP
NASA/JPL
Now playing
01:29
Watch the Ingenuity helicopter's first flight on Mars
AirTag
Apple
AirTag
Now playing
01:17
See AirTag, Apple's new device for tracking your lost stuff
Scene video following a crash involving a Tesla Saturday night in Spring, TX
Scott Engle
Scene video following a crash involving a Tesla Saturday night in Spring, TX
Now playing
01:09
Fatal Tesla crash had no one in the driver's seat, police say
alexey navalny russia health vladimir putin Kiley pkg intl ldn vpx_00012003.png
alexey navalny russia health vladimir putin Kiley pkg intl ldn vpx_00012003.png
Now playing
03:06
Navalny ally warns he is in dire health. Here's how he got here
DOGE COIN
Getty Images
DOGE COIN
Now playing
03:24
Dogecoin's value has skyrocketed this year
Fox News/CNN
Now playing
04:07
'Mean girl group chat': Keilar reacts to Trump's interview with Sean Hannity
Reuters
Now playing
02:14
Military spokesman announces transitional president in Chad
WCCO
Now playing
01:27
Shots fired at Minnesota National Guard and police team
(CNN) —  

Workers rejoice.

The minimum wage is set to go up in 72 jurisdictions in 2020. The increases will be in 24 states and 48 cities and counties, according to the advocacy group National Employment Law Project.

Most of those changes are set to begin on the first day of 2020, though New York’s pay raise is set to begin December 31, the NELP reported.

On New Year’s Day, 20 states and 26 cities and counties, mostly in California, will raise the minimum wages. Four more states and 23 more cities and counties will join later in the year, according to NELP.

“These increases will put much-needed money into the hands of the lowest-paid workers, many of whom struggle with high and ever-increasing costs of living,” wrote researcher and policy analyst Yannet Lathrop in a blog post announcing the new wages.

Past efforts to raise minimum wage

The minimum wage has been a hotly contested subject. Earlier this year, the US House of Representatives passed the Raise the Wage Act, to make a $15 an hour minimum wage a national standard — up from the current $7.25 an hour. The bill, however, didn’t make it past the Senate.

The bill was preceded by numerous calls for wage raises, notably in 2012 when fast-food workers in New York went on strike. At the time, some workers were only making $7.75 an hour. In 2012, the median wage in New York for fast food workers was $9 an hour, meaning half of all fast-food workers in New York were earning less than $9 an hour.

Raising minimum wage could hurt workers, some argue

But opponents of raising the minimum wage say the result could be fewer jobs. If employers have to pay their workers $15 an hour, they’ll hire less workers, the reasoning goes.

And that reasoning isn’t without merit. A study done in July by the Congressional Budget Office projected that a wage increase to $15 an hour would result in a loss of 1.3 million workers, or 0.8 percent of the workforce.

Some have backed a $12 an hour minimum wage instead to lessen the impact of a higher raise on the job market.

But others have argued the impact wouldn’t be as severe as projections assume. David Howell, a professor of economics and public policy at the New School, told CNN back in July that half of the projected jobs lost are held by teenagers, who could find other work more in-line with a career track. He said everyone else could be retrained for higher-paid work.

“The American problem isn’t quantity of jobs,” Howell said. “It’s quality of jobs.”

Lydia DePillis contributed to this report.